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101 - 110 of 129 results for: all courses

PHIL 20N: Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence

Is it really possible for an artificial system to achieve genuine intelligence: thoughts, consciousness, emotions? What would that mean? How could we know if it had been achieved? Is there a chance that we ourselves are artificial intelligences? Would artificial intelligences, under certain conditions, actually be persons? If so, how would that affect how they ought to be treated and what ought to be expected of them? Emerging technologies with impressive capacities already seem to function in ways we do not fully understand. What are the opportunities and dangers that this presents? How should the promises and hazards of these technologies be managed?nnPhilosophers have studied questions much like these for millennia, in scholarly debates that have increased in fervor with advances in psychology, neuroscience, and computer science. The philosophy of mind provides tools to carefully address whether genuine artificial intelligence and artificial personhood are possible. Epistemology (th more »
Is it really possible for an artificial system to achieve genuine intelligence: thoughts, consciousness, emotions? What would that mean? How could we know if it had been achieved? Is there a chance that we ourselves are artificial intelligences? Would artificial intelligences, under certain conditions, actually be persons? If so, how would that affect how they ought to be treated and what ought to be expected of them? Emerging technologies with impressive capacities already seem to function in ways we do not fully understand. What are the opportunities and dangers that this presents? How should the promises and hazards of these technologies be managed?nnPhilosophers have studied questions much like these for millennia, in scholarly debates that have increased in fervor with advances in psychology, neuroscience, and computer science. The philosophy of mind provides tools to carefully address whether genuine artificial intelligence and artificial personhood are possible. Epistemology (the philosophy of knowledge) helps us ponder how we might be able to know. Ethics provides concepts and theories to explore how all of this might bear on what ought to be done. We will read philosophical writings in these areas as well as writings explicitly addressing the questions about artificial intelligence, hoping for a deep and clear understanding of the difficult philosophical challenges the topic presents.nnNo background in any of this is presupposed, and you will emerge from the class having made a good start learning about computational technologies as well as a number of fields of philosophical thinking. It will also be a good opportunity to develop your skills in discussing and writing critically about complex issues.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

PHYSICS 14N: Quantum Information: Visions and Emerging Technologies

What sets quantum information apart from its classical counterpart is that it can be encoded non-locally, woven into correlations among multiple qubits in a phenomenon known as entanglement. We will discuss paradigms for harnessing entanglement to solve hitherto intractable computational problems or to push the precision of sensors to their fundamental quantum mechanical limits. We will also examine challenges that physicists and engineers are tackling in the laboratory today to enable the quantum technologies of the future.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 83N: Physics in the 21st Century

Preference to freshmen. This course provides an in-depth examination of frontiers of physics research, including fundamental physics, cosmology, and physics of the future. Questions such as: What is the universe made of? What is the nature of space, time, and matter? What can we learn about the history of the universe and what does it tell us about its future? A large part of 20th century was defined by revolutions in physics ¿ everyday applications of electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics. What other revolutions can physics bring to human civilization in the 21st century? What is quantum computing? What can physics say about consciousness? What does it take to visit other parts of the solar system, or even other stars? nnWe will also learn to convey these complex topics in engaging and diverse terms to the general public through writing and reading assignments, oral presentations, and multimedia projects. No prior knowledge of physics is necessary; all voices are welcome more »
Preference to freshmen. This course provides an in-depth examination of frontiers of physics research, including fundamental physics, cosmology, and physics of the future. Questions such as: What is the universe made of? What is the nature of space, time, and matter? What can we learn about the history of the universe and what does it tell us about its future? A large part of 20th century was defined by revolutions in physics ¿ everyday applications of electromagnetism, relativity, and quantum mechanics. What other revolutions can physics bring to human civilization in the 21st century? What is quantum computing? What can physics say about consciousness? What does it take to visit other parts of the solar system, or even other stars? nnWe will also learn to convey these complex topics in engaging and diverse terms to the general public through writing and reading assignments, oral presentations, and multimedia projects. No prior knowledge of physics is necessary; all voices are welcome to contribute to the discussion about these big ideas. Learning Goals: By the end of the quarter you will be able to explain the major questions that drive physics research to your friends and peers. You will understand how scientists study the impossibly small and impossibly large and be able to convey this knowledge in clear and concise terms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Kuo, C. (PI)

POLISCI 13N: Identity Politics 101

How do we understand the political choices citizens make? Why do Black and White Americans disagree so vehemently about racially-charged incidents like officer-involved shootings? What explains disagreements over policies like welfare and immigration? How do we understand ethnic conflict, both in the United States and around the world? What explains our commitments to salient social groups? Under what conditions should we expect group members to join in solidarity with one another? When does solidarity break down? And what helps us make sense of this strange time we find ourselves in? Identity does that--or at least it does a lot of it. But what is an identity? What are the conditions under which identities becomenpoliticized? How do identities work to structure attitudes and affect behavior? Over the course of the quarter, we will read a series of scholarly papers from across academic disciplines that provide some answers to these important questions.nStudents will be expected to enga more »
How do we understand the political choices citizens make? Why do Black and White Americans disagree so vehemently about racially-charged incidents like officer-involved shootings? What explains disagreements over policies like welfare and immigration? How do we understand ethnic conflict, both in the United States and around the world? What explains our commitments to salient social groups? Under what conditions should we expect group members to join in solidarity with one another? When does solidarity break down? And what helps us make sense of this strange time we find ourselves in? Identity does that--or at least it does a lot of it. But what is an identity? What are the conditions under which identities becomenpoliticized? How do identities work to structure attitudes and affect behavior? Over the course of the quarter, we will read a series of scholarly papers from across academic disciplines that provide some answers to these important questions.nStudents will be expected to engage the readings carefully and to participate in classroom discussions. Assignments will include reaction papers and a final presentation. By the end of our time together, I hope to convince you that all politics is identity politics, and that identity--in all of its complexity--is a thing worth thinking rigorously about. All students are encouraged to join, as we will benefit from the diversity of experiences and backgrounds that each of us brings to thenclassroom.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

POLISCI 19N: State-Building

Is it possible for the US to create consolidated democracies? Should we just give up? There are three candidate theories that explain how we get consolidated democracies: modernization theory; institutional capacity; rational choice institutionalism. Which is best? Which provides the best guidance for policy? What can we learn from Germany, Japan, Afghanistan and others?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Krasner, S. (PI)

POLISCI 25N: The US Congress in Historical and Comparative Perspective

This course traces the development of legislatures from their medieval European origins to the present, with primary emphasis on the case of the U.S. Congress. Students will learn about the early role played by assemblies in placing limits on royal power, especially via the power of the purse. About half the course will then turn to a more detailed consideration of the U.S. Congress's contemporary performance, analyzing how that performance is affected by procedural legacies from the past that affect most democratic legislatures worldwide.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Cox, G. (PI)

POLISCI 33N: How We Decide: Social Choice in the Age of Algorithms (MS&E 33N)

The digital revolution arrived with the promise of improving human life, including through its ability to transform the way in which we make social decisions. But one of the most common critiques today is that unstructured interactions in social media and online platforms have actually set us back by spreading fake news, amplifying polarization, and failing to aggregate our diverse views and opinions into collective choices that move our society forward. nnHow should social decisions be made in the age of algorithms? We will approach this question through the lens of social choice theory, and connect this theory from economics and political science to the potential design of algorithms that aggregate our diverse preferences and information. We will review various systems of preference and information aggregation in small groups as well as large societies, including voting systems, bargaining protocols, and methods of deliberation. We will also describe decision making problems that ari more »
The digital revolution arrived with the promise of improving human life, including through its ability to transform the way in which we make social decisions. But one of the most common critiques today is that unstructured interactions in social media and online platforms have actually set us back by spreading fake news, amplifying polarization, and failing to aggregate our diverse views and opinions into collective choices that move our society forward. nnHow should social decisions be made in the age of algorithms? We will approach this question through the lens of social choice theory, and connect this theory from economics and political science to the potential design of algorithms that aggregate our diverse preferences and information. We will review various systems of preference and information aggregation in small groups as well as large societies, including voting systems, bargaining protocols, and methods of deliberation. We will also describe decision making problems that arise in modern applications, such as distributed systems like blockchains and Wikipedia, as well as applications of topical interest such as the assignment of children to schools, the design of congressional districts, and the direct involvement of communities in participatory budgeting. nnA key objective of the class will be to get students to think about how social choice theory can be applied to real-life problems through the design of algorithms. There are no prerequisites, but students should come prepared to use high school level mathematics and deductive reasoning.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

POLISCI 46N: Contemporary African Politics

Africa has lagged behind the rest of the developing world in terms of three consequential outcomes: economic development, the establishment of social order through effective governance, and the consolidation of democracy. This course seeks to identify the historical and political sources accounting for this lag, to provide extensive case study and statistical material to understand what sustains it, and to examine recent examples of success pointing to a more hopeful future. Students will be asked to develop expertise on one or two African countries and report regularly to fellow students on the progress (or lack thereof) of their countries on each outcome and the reasons for it.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED
Instructors: Laitin, D. (PI)

PSYC 53N: Your Secret Mind: Getting to Know and Living with your Unconscious

Focuses on the motivational unconscious. Topics include the science of the unconscious mind and the techniques used to gain conscious access to these psychological process, as well as methods of exploring students' own unconscious for creative purposes and to understand personal habits, reactions, motives, emotions and thoughts. Case-based, problem-oriented format utilized to develop foundational understanding of the science of the unconscious mind. Emphasis on student study of self and own unconscious as case for the class. Student privacy will be protected.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Steiner, H. (PI)

PSYC 54N: Genes, Memes and Behavior

Examines how natural selection operates to shape successful genes in the gene pool, how cultural selection operates to shape successful "memes" in the pool of cultural ideas, and how selection by consequences operates to shape successful behaviors in our repertoires. Topics include cases in which selection produces undesirable consequences (e.g. genetic mutations, cultural problems, and aberrant behaviors in children). Emphasis on understanding the role of modern natural science in complex behaviors and why study of human life from an interdisciplinary perspective is important.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Hall, S. (PI)
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