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331 - 340 of 826 results for: all courses

EDUC 177A: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177A, CSRE 177E, HUMBIO 29A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Schell, E. (PI)

EDUC 177B: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CHILATST 177B, CSRE 177F)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Schell, E. (PI)

EDUC 178: Latino Families, Languages, and Schools (EDUC 270)

The challenges facing schools to establish school-family partnerships with newly arrived Latino immigrant parents. How language acts as a barrier to home-school communication and parent participation. Current models of parent-school collaboration and the ideology of parental involvement in schooling.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

EDUC 181: Multicultural Issues in Higher Education (CSRE 181, EDUC 381)

The primary social, educational, and political issues that have surfaced in American higher education due to the rapid demographic changes occurring since the early 80s. Research efforts and the policy debates include multicultural communities, the campus racial climate, and student development; affirmative action in college admissions; multiculturalism and the curriculum; and multiculturalism and scholarship.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

EDUC 197: Gender and Education in Global and Comparative Perspectives (FEMGEN 297, SOC 134)

This course introduces students to theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to an understanding of the role of education in relation to structures of gender differentiation, hierarchy, and power. It familiarizes students with and enables them to critically evaluate research on the status of children, adolescents, and young adults around the world and their participation patterns in various sectors of society, particularly in education. Students have the opportunity to gain research skills by designing research proposals or to develop action plans on topics of their choosing related to gender and education from global and/or comparative perspectives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

EMED 121E: Ethnicity and Medicine (HUMBIO 121E)

Weekly lecture series. Examines the linguistic, social class, and cultural factors that impact patient care. Presentations promote culturally sensitive health care services and review contemporary research issues involving minority and underserved populations. Topics include health care inequities and medical practices of African Americans, Asians, Latinos, Native Americans, immigrants, and refugees in both urban and rural settings. 1 unit requires weekly lecture attendance, completion of required readings, completion of response questions; 2 units requires weekly lecture attendance and discussion session, completion of required readings and weekly response questions; additional requirement for 3 units (HUMBIO only) is completion of a significant term paper Only students taking the course for 3 units may request a letter grade. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above.This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Gallegos, M. (PI)

EMED 127: Health Care Leadership (EMED 227, PUBLPOL 127, PUBLPOL 227)

Healthcare Leadership class brings eminent healthcare leaders from a variety of sectors within healthcare to share their personal reflections and insights on effective leadership. Speakers discuss their personal core values, share lessons learned and their recipe for effective leadership in the healthcare field, including reflection on career and life choices. Speakers include CEOs of healthcare technology, pharmaceutical and other companies, leaders in public health, eminent leaders of hospitals, academia, biotechnology companies and other health care organizations. The class will also familiarize the students with the healthcare industry, as well as introduce concepts and skills relevant to healthcare leadership. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. Students taking the course Mondays and Wednesdays should enroll for 4 units (exceptions for a 3 unit registration can be made with the consent of instructor to be still eligible for Ways credit). Students taking the course on Wednesdays only should register for 2 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

EMED 227: Health Care Leadership (EMED 127, PUBLPOL 127, PUBLPOL 227)

Healthcare Leadership class brings eminent healthcare leaders from a variety of sectors within healthcare to share their personal reflections and insights on effective leadership. Speakers discuss their personal core values, share lessons learned and their recipe for effective leadership in the healthcare field, including reflection on career and life choices. Speakers include CEOs of healthcare technology, pharmaceutical and other companies, leaders in public health, eminent leaders of hospitals, academia, biotechnology companies and other health care organizations. The class will also familiarize the students with the healthcare industry, as well as introduce concepts and skills relevant to healthcare leadership. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. Students taking the course Mondays and Wednesdays should enroll for 4 units (exceptions for a 3 unit registration can be made with the consent of instructor to be still eligible for Ways credit). Students taking the course on Wednesdays only should register for 2 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 12A: Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (AFRICAAM 43, AMSTUD 12A)

(Formerly English 43/143). In his bold study, What Was African American Literature?, Kenneth Warren defines African American literature as a late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century response to the nation's Jim Crow segregated order. But in the aftermath of the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement, can critics still speak, coherently, of "African American literature"? And how does this political conception of African American literary production compare with accounts grounded in black language and culture? Taking up Warren's intervention, this course will explore African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals and slave narratives to texts composed at the height of desegregation and decolonization struggles at mid-century and beyond.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 20Q: Making of the Modern Woman: Robots, Aliens, & the Feminine in Science Fiction (FEMGEN 20Q)

What does the genre of science fiction have to say about gender identity? How are women in science fiction represented by themselves and by others? Who are women? What is gender and how is it constructed and performed? What is the relationship between man and machine? Between woman and machine? How is gender represented through narratives of literal alien otherness? What does it mean to be a woman online or in gamer culture? Material will include feminist analysis of gender in popular science fiction literature and visual media from 19th through 21st centuries. Texts range from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein to Alex Garland¿s Ex Machina.nnThis course will be reading and writing intensive but should also offer opportunities for spirited discussion. We will be engaging with sensitive subjects such as race, class, gender, and sexuality. Assignments include weekly short essays, discussion leadership, individual presentations, and a final research paper.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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