2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

41 - 50 of 62 results for: all courses

LINGUIST 47N: Languages, Dialects, Speakers

Preference to freshmen. Variation and change in languages from around the world; language and thought; variation in sound patterns and grammatical structures; linguistic and social structures of variation; how languages differ from one another and how issues in linguistics connect to other social and cultural issues; the systematic study of language.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Anttila, A. (PI)

LINGUIST 54N: Social Bias and Earwitness Memory

As individuals, we would like to believe that we are free from biases and that we are somehow immune to acting on the social biases that we have been socialized to since birth. We would like to believe that we can report experiences accurately, recalling events as they truly happened. But, memory is faulty and stereotypes and social biases are pervasive. And, at a level beneath our own control, these biases slip in and influence our memory of events. Eyewitness memory, and the inaccuracy and unreliability of eyewitnesses, is a perfect example of this. But, what about the things we hear? Speech carries a great deal of information; packets of co-varying cues we have been raised to recognize categorically, informing us about a talker¿s race, accent, emotion, and gender. We have, through our ears, information about events that occur. And, we have in our minds, stereotyped expectations about how various groups of people behave and what various groups of people might say. In this course, we more »
As individuals, we would like to believe that we are free from biases and that we are somehow immune to acting on the social biases that we have been socialized to since birth. We would like to believe that we can report experiences accurately, recalling events as they truly happened. But, memory is faulty and stereotypes and social biases are pervasive. And, at a level beneath our own control, these biases slip in and influence our memory of events. Eyewitness memory, and the inaccuracy and unreliability of eyewitnesses, is a perfect example of this. But, what about the things we hear? Speech carries a great deal of information; packets of co-varying cues we have been raised to recognize categorically, informing us about a talker¿s race, accent, emotion, and gender. We have, through our ears, information about events that occur. And, we have in our minds, stereotyped expectations about how various groups of people behave and what various groups of people might say. In this course, we will explore how these two types of information (e.g., the percept of what is actually heard vs. our stereotypes about who is likely to have said what) clash together and influence ¿earwitness memory¿. We will read and critique journal articles, blogs, and popular science articles, think about the reliability of memory for auditory events, and we will work together to develop three well-designed thought experiments that address questions at the heart of this issue. Along the way, we will learn a bit about the acoustics of speech, social variation in speech, speech perception and spoken word recognition, memory, and experimental design and analysis. Students in this course should be committed to reading the assignments, sharing their ideas about the readings (without concern for ¿being right¿), and think creatively about ways we can explore the idea of earwitness memory together. While this is a one-quarter course, my goal is to pursue our thought experiments collaboratively, with any interested students in subsequent quarters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Sumner, M. (PI)

MATH 83N: Proofs and Modern Mathematics

How do mathematicians think? Why are the mathematical facts learned in school true? In this course students will explore higher-level mathematical thinking and will gain familiarity with a crucial aspect of mathematics: achieving certainty via mathematical proofs, a creative activity of figuring out what should be true and why. This course is ideal for students who would like to learn about the reasoning underlying mathematical results, but at a pace and level of abstraction not as intense as Math 61CM/DM, as a consequence benefiting from additional opportunity to explore the reasoning. Familiarity with one-variable calculus is strongly recommended at least at the AB level of AP Calculus since a significant part of the seminar develops develops some of the main results in that material systematically from a small list of axioms. We also address linear algebra from the viewpoint of a mathematician, illuminating notions such as fields and abstract vector spaces. This seminar may be paired with Math 51; though that course is not a pre- or co-requisite.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR

ME 23N: Soft Robots for Humanity

While traditional robotic manipulators are constructed from rigid links and simple joints, a new generation of robotic devices are soft, using flexible, deformable materials. Students in this class will get hands-on experience building soft robots using various materials, actuators, and programming to create robots that perform different tasks. Through this process, students will gain an appreciation for the capabilities and limitations of bio-inspired systems, use design thinking to create novel robotic solutions, and gain practical interdisciplinary engineering skills.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Okamura, A. (PI)

MUSIC 14N: Women Making Music (FEMGEN 13N)

Preference to freshmen. Women's musical activities across times and cultures; how ideas about gender influence the creation, performance, and perception of music.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Hadlock, H. (PI)

MUSIC 32N: Sculpting with Sounds, Images, and Words

Throughout history and from East to West, cultures abound in multimedia forms. Whether in Coldplay's Music Video or Fantasia, Pepsi TV adds or Wagner's opera, Miyazaki anime or traditional Noh Theater of Japan, the three modes of expression (sounds, images, and word) are interwoven in distinctive ways. What are their individual and combined powers? How can one harness them in an online context? Can Web be a stage for multimedia theater? What is unique about the poetry of intermodal metaphor? The course will be an opportunity to face these questions in creative web-based projects as well as through in-class viewing of multimedia works, analysis and debates, readings, and student presentations. The seminar will be taught at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics where students will have access to new media technologies. Prior experience in music, literature, art practice or computer programming is welcome but not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-CE

NSUR 81N: Mitochondrial Transport and Function in Neuronal Health and Death

As our population continues to age, age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and ALS are becoming more prevalent and thus pose a daunting danger to public health nationwide. Effective treatments are desperately needed, however, we still know very little about how neurons die in those diseases. One organelle that is especially important to neuronal health is mitochondria, the power plants for the cell. In this IntroSem, we will learn how neurons employ molecular machinery to regulate, transport, and distribute mitochondria, and importantly, how these fundamental regulations are compromised in neurological disorders. A hands-on laboratory section is available for students who are interested in learning imaging mitochondrial transport in live cells using confocal microscopy. The laboratory section is located at the beautiful Arastradero campus, which provides a unique opportunities for first-year students to explore Stanford campuses and adjacent areas.Prerequisites: High school biology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Wang, X. (PI)

PHIL 3N: Randomness: Computational and Philosophical Approaches (CS 57N)

Is it ever reasonable to make a decision randomly? For example, would you ever let an important choice depend on the flip of a coin? Can randomness help us answer difficult questions more accurately or more efficiently? What is randomness anyway? Can an object be random? Are there genuinely random processes in the world, and if so, how can we tell? In this seminar, we will explore these questions through the lenses of philosophy and computation. By the end of the quarter students should have an appreciation of the many roles that randomness plays in both humanities and sciences, as well as a grasp of some of the key analytical tools used to study the concept. The course will be self-contained, and no prior experience with randomness/probability is necessary.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

PHIL 21N: Ethics of Sports (ETHICSOC 121N)

This seminar will be focused on the ethical challenges that are encountered in sport. We will focus on the moral and political issues that affect the world of sport and which athletes, coaches, sports commentators and fans are faced with. For instance, we will ask questions such as: what is a fair game (the ethics of effort, merit, success)? Is it ethical to train people to use violence (the ethics of martial arts)? Are divisions by gender categories justified and what should we think of gender testing? Is the use of animals in sport ever justified? Which forms of performance enhancements are acceptable in sport (the ethics of drug use and enhancements through technologies)? Should we ban sports that damage the players¿ health? Does society owe social support to people who hurt themselves while practicing extreme sports? nnThe class will be structured around small group discussions and exercises as well as brief lectures to introduce key moral and political concepts (such as fairness, more »
This seminar will be focused on the ethical challenges that are encountered in sport. We will focus on the moral and political issues that affect the world of sport and which athletes, coaches, sports commentators and fans are faced with. For instance, we will ask questions such as: what is a fair game (the ethics of effort, merit, success)? Is it ethical to train people to use violence (the ethics of martial arts)? Are divisions by gender categories justified and what should we think of gender testing? Is the use of animals in sport ever justified? Which forms of performance enhancements are acceptable in sport (the ethics of drug use and enhancements through technologies)? Should we ban sports that damage the players¿ health? Does society owe social support to people who hurt themselves while practicing extreme sports? nnThe class will be structured around small group discussions and exercises as well as brief lectures to introduce key moral and political concepts (such as fairness, equality, freedom, justice, exploitation, etc.). I will also bring guests speakers who are involved in a sport activity at Stanford or who have worked on sports as part of their academic careers. By the end of the seminar, students will have a good understanding of the various ethical challenges that surround the world of sport. They will be able to critically discuss sport activities, norms, modes of assessments and policies (on campus and beyond). They will also be prepared to apply the critical ethical thinking that they will have deployed onto other topics than sports. They will have been introduced to the normative approach to social issues, which consists in asking how things should be rather than describing how things are. They will be prepared to take more advanced classes in ethics, political theory, as well as moral and political philosophy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

PHYSICS 14N: Quantum Information: Visions and Emerging Technologies

What sets quantum information apart from its classical counterpart is that it can be encoded non-locally, woven into correlations among multiple qubits in a phenomenon known as entanglement. We will discuss paradigms for harnessing entanglement to solve hitherto intractable computational problems or to push the precision of sensors to their fundamental quantum mechanical limits. We will also examine challenges that physicists and engineers are tackling in the laboratory today to enable the quantum technologies of the future.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SMA
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints