2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

21 - 30 of 62 results for: all courses

EARTHSYS 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (ESS 38N, GEOLSCI 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
Instructors: Dunbar, R. (PI)

EARTHSYS 41N: The Global Warming Paradox

Preference to freshman. Focus is on the complex climate challenges posed by the substantial benefits of energy consumption, including the critical tension between the enormous global demand for increased human well-being and the negative climate consequences of large-scale emissions of carbon dioxide. Topics include: Earth¿s energy balance; detection and attribution of climate change; the climate response to enhanced greenhouse forcing; impacts of climate change on natural and human systems; and proposed methods for curbing further climate change. Sources include peer-reviewed scientific papers, current research results, and portrayal of scientific findings by the mass media and social networks.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

ECON 11N: Understanding the Welfare System

Welfare-reform legislation passed by the federal government in the mid-1990s heralded a dramatic step in the movement that has been termed the devolution revolution, which is again being discussed in the context of healthcare reform. The centerpiece of devolution is the transfer of more responsibilities for antipoverty programs to the states. We will explore the effects of these reforms and the role that devolution plays in the ongoing debates over the designs of programs that make up America's social safety net. In addition to discussing conventional welfare programs (e.g., Medicaid, food stamps, TANF, SSI) and other governmental policies assisting low-income families (EITC, minimum wages), we will examine the trends in governmental spending on anti-poverty programs and how our nation defines poverty and eligibility for income support. We will apply economics principles throughout to understand the effectiveness of America's antipoverty programs and their consequences on the behavior and circumstances of families. Prerequisites: A basic understanding/knowledge of introductory economics is recommended.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: MaCurdy, T. (PI)

ECON 22N: Causes and Consequences of the Rise in Inequality

In this class we will discuss the economic and institutional causes of the rise in inequality in the US and other countries over the last 40 years. We will also discuss the consequences of inequality in terms of social justice, economic welfare, aggregate economic performance, intergenerational mobility, and the possible implications of inequality for the recent global financial crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ECON 25N: Public Policy and Personal Finance (PUBLPOL 55N)

The seminar will provide an introduction and discussion of the impact of public policy on personal finance. Voters regularly rate the economy as one of the most important factors shaping their political views and most of those opinions are focused on their individual bottom lines. In this course we will discuss the rationale for different public policies and how they affect personal financial situations. We will explore personal finance issues such as taxes, loans, charity, insurance, and pensions. Using the context of (hypothetical) personal finance positions, we will discuss the public policy implications of various proposals and how they affect different groups of people, for example: the implications of differential tax rates for different types of income, the promotion of home ownership in the U.S., and policies to care for our aging population. While economic policy will be the focus of much of the course, we will also examine some of the implications of social policies on personal finance as well. There will be weekly readings and several short policy-related writing assignments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Rosston, G. (PI)

EDUC 116N: Howard Zinn and the Quest for Historical Truth (HISTORY 116N)

With more than two million copies in print, Howard Zinn's A People's History is a cultural icon. We will use Zinn's book to probe how we determine what was true in the past. A People's History will be our point of departure, but our journey will visit a variety of historical trouble spots: debates about whether the US was founded as a Christian nation, Holocaust denial, and the "Birther" controversy of President Obama.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Wineburg, S. (PI)

EE 25N: Science of Information

We live in the Information Age, but what is information, anyway? In 1948, Claude Shannon published a seminal paper formalizing our modern notion of information. Through lectures and lab visits, we'll learn how information can be measured and represented, why bits are the universal currency for information exchange, and how these ideas led to smartphones, the Internet, and more. We¿ll get a glimpse of information elements in other domains, including neural codes of the brain, cryptographic codes, genetic code, quantum information, and even entertainment. As a final project, students will create podcast episodes on one of the topics explored in the course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

ENGLISH 40N: Theatrical Wonders from Shakespeare to Mozart

What is the secret of theatrical illusion? How does the theater move us to wonder, sympathetic identification, and reflection? How can the theater help society understand and manage social conflict and historical change? We will ask these questions through a close examination--on the page and on the stage--of dramatic masterpieces by Shakespeare and Mozart. We will attend live performances of Gounod¿s opera Romeo and Juliet and of Mozart¿s opera The Marriage of Figaro. No prior knowledge of music or foreign languages is required; neither is prior experience in theatricals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Hoxby, B. (PI)

ENGLISH 87N: The Conscience

What kind of science, or knowledge, does the con-science impart? How does this knowledge relate to what one nineteenth-century thinker called the ¿intellectual conscience¿? The indeterminacy of conscience¿s claims makes it a subject that all but demands close reading, and it is a matter of historical fact that ethical reasoning has often taken place within and through literary forms. This course thus takes the scientific efflorescence of the early modern period (c. 1500-1800) as its historical center of gravity, but focuses above all on the development of interpretive habits. Proceeding through texts long associated with crises of conscience (selections may include Genesis, Macbeth, Moll Flanders), we will consider how the creative force of interpretation bears on evolving conceptions of ethical inquiry and intellectual obligation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Yu, E. (PI)

ESS 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (EARTHSYS 38N, GEOLSCI 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
Instructors: Dunbar, R. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints