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OSPSANTG 116X: Modernization and its Discontents: Chilean Politics at the Turn of the Century

Chile's strides towards becoming a developed country have engendered high levels of alienation and disaffection among significant sectors of the population. The roots of this apparent paradox of modernization, focusing on newly emerging actors in the Chilean political scene: Mapuche organizations, women's groups, the environmental movement, and new features of the established ones like trade unions and human rights activists.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Correa, G. (PI)

OSPSANTG 119X: The Chilean Economy: History, International Relations, and Development Strategies

The Chilean economy in five stages, taking into account: the international economic position of Chile; internal economic structures closely related to the inherited historical conditions and to the changing international economic position of the country; and the economic strategies prevalent during the period and the concrete development policies conducted by government authorities.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Luders, R. (PI)

OSPSANTG 129X: Latin America in the International System

Latin America's role in world politics, with emphasis on the history of and models for explaining U.S.-Latin American relations. Latin America's evolving relationship in the international system.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PEDS 65N: Understanding Children's Health Disparities

The social and economic factors that affect children and their health status. The principal sources of disparities in the health of children in the U.S. are not biologic, but social and economic. Topics include ethnic, cultural, and behavioral factors that affect children's health, both directly and indirectly; lack of health insurance; and current proposals for health care reform, focusing specifically on how they will impact existing health disparities among children.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

POLISCI 1: The Science of Politics

Why do countries go to war? How can we explain problems such as poverty, inequality, and pollution? What can be done to improve political representation in the United States and other countries? We will use scientific methods to answer these and other fundamental questions about politics.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

POLISCI 2: Introduction to American National Government and Politics (AMSTUD 2)

American political institutions (the Presidency, Congress, and the Court) and political processes (the formation of political attitudes and voting) have for some time now been criticized as inadequate to the task of making modern public policy. Against the backdrop of American culture and political history we examine how public policy has been and is being made. We use theories from Political Science and Economics to assess the state of the American system and the policy making process. We use case studies and lectures to analyze contemporary issues including environmental policy, taxes and spending , gun control , economic growth and inequality and mobility. In some of these issue areas we use comparative data from other countries to see how the U.S. is doing relative to other countries. In addition to class room lecture and discussion, student groups are formed to analyze policy issues of relevance to them. (This course has merged with Political Science 123/PubPol 101)
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

POLISCI 10N: International Organizations and the World Order

Since the end of World War II, there has been an explosion in the number, scope, and complexity of international organizations. International organizations such as the United Nations, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and World Bank now play critical roles across a wide range of policy issues. Why have international organizations proliferated and expanded since the mid-20th century? How do these organizations shape the international system? Why do states sometimes conduct foreign policy through international organizations, while other times preferring traditional means? Why do some international organizations evolve over time, while others resist change? What are some of the pathologies and problems of contemporary international organizations? We will explore these questions by carefully examining the functions and operations of major international organizations. You will also complete a research project examining an international organization of your choice and present your findings in class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Lipscy, P. (PI)

POLISCI 19N: Politics of Energy Efficiency

We will examine the political context of energy efficiency and climate change. Why are some countries, such as Japan and France, able to achieve high levels of energy efficiency, while others, such as the United States and Australia, struggle to do so? What political factors faciliate or impede energy efficiency policies? Why is international cooperation on climate change so difficult?
Last offered: Winter 2013 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

POLISCI 20Q: Democracy in Crisis: Learning from the Past (EDUC 122Q, HISTORY 52Q)

This Sophomore Seminar will focus on U.S. democracy and will use a series of case studies of major events in our national history to explore what happened and why to American democracy at key pressure points. This historical exploration should shed light on how the current challenges facing American democracy might best be handled. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Ehrlich, T. (PI)

POLISCI 25N: The US Congress in Historical and Comparative Perspective

This course traces the development of legislatures from their medieval European origins to the present, with primary emphasis on the case of the U.S. Congress. Students will learn about the early role played by assemblies in placing limits on royal power, especially via the power of the purse. About half the course will then turn to a more detailed consideration of the U.S. Congress's contemporary performance, analyzing how that performance is affected by procedural legacies from the past that affect most democratic legislatures worldwide.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Cox, G. (PI)
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