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51 - 60 of 71 results for: all courses

MUSIC 33N: Beethoven

This seminar is designed as an in-depth introduction to the music of Ludwig van Beethoven. In addition to exploring the composer's principal works in a variety of genres (symphonies, piano sonatas, string quartets, opera, etc.), we will consider broader questions of biography and reception history. How have images of the composer and the fortunes of his music changed over time? How did his compositions come to define the paradigm of Western classical music? What impact has he had on popular culture? The class is open to all levels of musical expertise; the ability to read music is not a requirement. Come prepared to discover -- or rediscover -- some great music!
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Hinton, S. (PI)

PHIL 13N: "Can good people like bad music?" and other questions

Think of a musical artist you just can't stand to listen to. Chances are, this artist has thousands, if not millions, of adoring fans. That is, what's "bad music" to you is "good music" to others. This fact is not shocking: we all know that people have different tastes in music, and in art more generally. But what does this fact tell us about art, other people, and ourselves? Are some of us right and others of us wrong about what's good and bad music? Is there reason to think that some music is "objectively" better than other music? Can we say that those who like "bad music" are missing something, or mistaken in their tastes? If so, why not think it's us that are mistaken? How much are our own tastes bound up with "who we are"? And what might this mean for our capacity to appreciate tastes which are not our own?nThis seminar is an investigation into these and other questions. Through the specific lens of music, we will explore the nature of artistic taste more generally. Our main course text will be Carl Wilson's Let's Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste, a popular introduction to our topic. We will also look at and discuss actual album reviews, pieces of music journalism, and news stories. Class meetings will be heavily discussion-based, and students should come to class ready to share, debate, and scrutinize their own musical tastes. Outside of class, students will develop their understanding through a variety of informal and creative writing assignments, such as exploratory journal entries and mock fan letters. Your taste in music may very well change as a result of this seminar, but this is not its aim. The goal is to understand what it means to disagree about art, through which you will learn how to respond more intelligently and empathetically to such disagreements as they come up in your everyday life.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Costello, W. (PI)

PHYSICS 18N: Frontiers in Theoretical Physics and Cosmology

Preference to freshmen. The course will begin with a description of the current standard models of gravitation, cosmology, and elementary particle physics. We will then focus on frontiers of current understanding including investigations of very early universe cosmology, string theory, and the physics of black holes.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 45N: Advanced Topics in Light and Heat

Preference to freshmen. Explores the quantum and classical properties of light from stars, lasers and other sources. Complements the subject matter presented in PHYSICS 45 to include modern applications from gravity wave interferometers to x-ray lasers. Corequisite: PHYSICS 45 or advanced placement.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

PHYSICS 81N: Science on the Back of the Envelope

Understanding the complex world around us quantitatively, using order of magnitude estimates and dimensional analysis. Starting from a handful of fundamental constants of Nature, one can estimate complex quantities such as cosmological length and time scales, size of the atom, height of Mount Everest, speed of tsunami, energy density of fuels and climate effects. Through these examples students learn the art of deductive thinking, fundamental principles of science and the beautiful unity of nature.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Zhang, S. (PI)

POLISCI 18N: Civil War and International Politics: Syria in Context

How and why do civil wars start, drag on, and end? What does focus of post-Cold War U.S. foreign policy on countries torn apart by civil war tell us about contemporary international relations? We consider these and related questions, with the conflict in Syria as our main case study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Fearon, J. (PI)

POLISCI 25N: The US Congress in Historical and Comparative Perspective

This course traces the development of legislatures from their medieval European origins to the present, with primary emphasis on the case of the U.S. Congress. Students will learn about the early role played by assemblies in placing limits on royal power, especially via the ¿power of the purse.¿ About half the course will then turn to a more detailed consideration of the U.S. Congress¿s contemporary performance, analyzing how that performance is affected by procedural legacies from the past that affect most democratic legislatures worldwide.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Cox, G. (PI)

PSYC 54N: Genes, Memes and Behavior

Examines how natural selection operates to shape successful genes in the gene pool, how cultural selection operates to shape successful "memes" in the pool of cultural ideas, and how selection by consequences operates to shape successful behaviors in our repertoires. Topics include cases in which selection produces undesirable consequences (e.g. genetic mutations, cultural problems, and aberrant behaviors in children). Emphasis on understanding the role of modern natural science in complex behaviors and why study of human life from an interdisciplinary perspective is important.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Hall, S. (PI)

PSYC 70N: Mind-Body Medicine: A Global Perspective

Explores ways in which the powerful connection between the brain and the body can be harnessed to maintain health or fight disease.Intended for students who have a general interest in matters of mind and health, and students who are specifically interested in the psychological/biological/medical sciences. Course begins with a historical perspective on how diverse cultures and medical systems from around the world grapple with the concept of the mind-body connection, then goes through a clear and accessible overview of the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems, and then explores mind-body techniques used in modern societies. Investigates the mind-body connection in the context of: western medicine, traditional medical systems of different cultures, health effects of "good" versus "bad" stress, meditation and other stress reduction techniques, positive and negative emotions, medical applications of hypnosis, the placebo and nocebo effects, and disorders such as anxiety and depression.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Dhabhar, F. (PI)

PSYCH 12N: Self Theories

Preference to freshmen. The impact of people's belief in a growing versus fixed self on their motivation and performance in school, business, sports, and relationships. How such theories develop and can be changed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Dweck, C. (PI)
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