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11 - 20 of 71 results for: all courses

CHEM 28N: Science Innovation and Communication

Preference to freshmen. The course will explore evolutionary and revolutionary scientific advances; their consequences to society, biotechnology, and the economy; and mechanisms for communicating science to the public. The course will engage academic and industrial thought leaders and provide an opportunity for students to participate in communicating science to the public.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Wender, P. (PI)

CLASSICS 26N: The Roman Empire: Its Grandeur and Fall (HISTORY 11N)

(Formerly CLASSHIS 24N.) Preference to freshmen. Explore themes on the Roman Empire and its decline from the 1st through the 5th centuries C.E.. What was the political and military glue that held this diverse, multi-ethnic empire together? What were the bases of wealth and how was it distributed? What were the possibilities and limits of economic growth? How integrated was it in culture and religion? What were the causes and consequences of the conversion to Christianity? Why did the Empire fall in the West? How suitable is the analogy of the U.S. in the 21st century?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:IHUM-3, WAY-SI
Instructors: Saller, R. (PI)

COMPLIT 14N: Imagining India: Art, Culture, Politics in Modern India (CSRE 15N, FEMGEN 14N, TAPS 14N)

This course explores history via cultural responses in modern India. We will examine a range of fiction, film and drama to consider the ways in which India emerges through its cultural productions. The course will consider key historical events such as the partition of the subcontinent, independence from British rule, Green Revolution, Emergency, liberalization of the Indian economy, among others. We will reflect on epochal historical moments by means of artisticnresponses to these events. For example, Ritwik Ghatak's experimental cinema intervenes into debates around the Bengal partition; Rohinton Mistry's novel, A Fine Balance grapples with the suspension of civil liberties during the emergency between 1975-77; Rahul Varma's play Bhopal reflects on the Bhopal gas tragedy, considered the world's worst industrial disaster. Students willnread, view and reflect on the aesthetic and historical texts through their thoughtful engagement in class discussions and written e ssays. They will also have opportunities to imaginatively respond to these texts via short creative projects, which could range from poems, monologues, solo pieces, web installations, etc. Readings will also include Mahashweta Devi, Amitav Ghosh, Girish Karnad, Jhumpa Lahiri, Manjula Padmanabhan, Salman Rushdie, Aparna Sen, among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Menon, J. (PI)

COMPMED 80N: Introduction to Animal Behavior

Preference to freshman. Behavior is what makes animals special (thirsty plants don't walk to water), but why do animals behave the way they do? What does their behavior tell us about their inner lives, and about ourselves? What do lipstick and cuckoos and fireflies have in common? Why would nobody want to be a penguin? What do mice say to each other in their pee-mail? Learning how to think about questions like these gives us a unique perspective on the natural world. Format: Discussion and criticism of video examples, documentaries, and research papers. Topics: History and approaches to animal behavior; development of behavior, from genetics to learning; mechanisms of behavior, from neurons to motivation; function of behavior, from honest signals to selfish genes; the phylogeny of behavior, from domestication to speciation; and modern applications of behavior, from abnormal behavior, to conservation, to animal welfare, and animal consciousness.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Garner, J. (PI)

CS 44N: Computational Thinking and Systems in the Real-World

Computing in the real-world is too often viewed as working away concocting some computer incantations hidden inside some high technology company. However, computing and computer communication has infiltrated and in many cases revolutionized several ¿systems¿ in the real world, including financial systems, inventory management, advertising systems, supply chain management, transportation systems, defense systems and so on. Moreover, the discipline of thinking that has developed to build these systems, computational thinking, has powerful applicability to real-world problems and situations outside of computer programming. This course provides an introduction and exposure to some of these dramatic trends, opportunities and risks. Also included is an introduction to some basic ideas in ¿computational thinking¿. The course will include guest speakers. No programming competence is assumed but exposure to programming would be useful. Interest in the real world and interest is not being run-over by this trend is essential.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Cheriton, D. (PI)

CS 45N: Computers and Photography: From Capture to Sharing

Preference to freshmen with experience in photography and use of computers. Elements of photography, such as lighting, focus, depth of field, aperture, and composition. How a photographer makes photos available for computer viewing, reliably stores them, organizes them, tags them, searches them, and distributes them online. No programming experience required. Digital SLRs and editing software will be provided to those students who do not wish to use their own.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

CS 46N: Big Data, Big Discoveries, Big Fallacies

A sea change has occurred in science, technology, medicine, politics, and society as a whole: many of the world's biggest discoveries and decisions are now being made on the basis of analyzing massive data sets, referred to as "big data". Everyday examples include social-network friend recommendations, and weather predictions far more accurate than a decade ago; both use vast collections of data to model the past and predict the future. But it is surprisingly easy to come to false conclusions from data analysis alone. For example, we might conclude that acne medicine prevents heart attacks and strokes, if we forget to factor in the age of the patients. Privacy is a major concern: Target stores analyzed buying patterns to predict with remarkable accuracy which of their shoppers had just become pregnant, but trouble arose when they sent baby ads to the homes of pregnant teens whose parents weren't yet in the know. We will start by surveying the history of data-driven activities, leading up to the recent Big Data explosion. A variety of data analysis techniques will be covered, leading students to appreciate that even simple techniques can go a long way when the data set is large enough. Common stumbling blocks leading to false conclusions will be discussed, and students will be asked to debate the many issues surrounding privacy. In one project, students will see whose analysis techniques can best predict user movie ratings based on past rating behavior. A second project will be individually designed in an area of the student's choosing. The seminar will include a mix of assigned readings, small-scale investigations and assignments, classroom discussions, and two projects. No computer programming or special math skills are required; students will learn the basic techniques and tools they need to complete the data analysis assignments and projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CS 54N: Great Ideas in Computer Science

Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to freshmen. Covers the intellectual tradition of computer science emphasizing ideas that reflect the most important milestones in the history of the discipline. No prior experience with programming is assumed. Topics include programming and problem solving; implementing computation in hardware; algorithmic efficiency; the theoretical limits of computation; cryptography and security; and the philosophy behind artificial intelligence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Roberts, E. (PI)

CSRE 15N: Imagining India: Art, Culture, Politics in Modern India (COMPLIT 14N, FEMGEN 14N, TAPS 14N)

This course explores history via cultural responses in modern India. We will examine a range of fiction, film and drama to consider the ways in which India emerges through its cultural productions. The course will consider key historical events such as the partition of the subcontinent, independence from British rule, Green Revolution, Emergency, liberalization of the Indian economy, among others. We will reflect on epochal historical moments by means of artisticnresponses to these events. For example, Ritwik Ghatak's experimental cinema intervenes into debates around the Bengal partition; Rohinton Mistry's novel, A Fine Balance grapples with the suspension of civil liberties during the emergency between 1975-77; Rahul Varma's play Bhopal reflects on the Bhopal gas tragedy, considered the world's worst industrial disaster. Students willnread, view and reflect on the aesthetic and historical texts through their thoughtful engagement in class discussions and written e ssays. They will also have opportunities to imaginatively respond to these texts via short creative projects, which could range from poems, monologues, solo pieces, web installations, etc. Readings will also include Mahashweta Devi, Amitav Ghosh, Girish Karnad, Jhumpa Lahiri, Manjula Padmanabhan, Salman Rushdie, Aparna Sen, among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Menon, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 41N: The Global Warming Paradox

Preference to freshman. Focus is on the complex climate challenges posed by the substantial benefits of energy consumption, including the critical tension between the enormous global demand for increased human well-being and the negative climate consequences of large-scale emissions of carbon dioxide. Topics include: Earth¿s energy balance; detection and attribution of climate change; the climate response to enhanced greenhouse forcing; impacts of climate change on natural and human systems; and proposed methods for curbing further climate change. Sources include peer-reviewed scientific papers, current research results, and portrayal of scientific findings by the mass media and social networks.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
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