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JEWISHST 288: Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict (HISTORY 288, HISTORY 388, JEWISHST 388)

This course examines some salient issues of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the late 19th century to the present. At the end of the course you should be able to articulate the positions of the major parties to the conflict, with the understanding that there is no single, unified Zionist (or Jewish) or Palestinian (or Arab) position. One quarter does not allow sufficient time to cover even all of the important topics comprehensively (for example, the role of the Arab states, the USA and the USSR, and the internal history of Israel receive less attention than is desirable). Some prior knowledge of Middle East history is desirable, but not required. Vigorous debate and criticism are strongly encouraged. Criticism and response expressed in a civil tone is an important way to get a fuller and more truthful picture of something. This is not only a fundamental democratic right and a basic citizenship skill, but it is essential to interpreting information and making good policy. Rights not used are easily lost.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI
Instructors: Beinin, J. (PI)

LAWGEN 116N: Guns, Drugs, Abortion, and Empirical Evaluation of Law and Policy

Guns, Drugs, Abortion, Capital Punishment, Policing and Prisons, and Other Uncontroversial Topics in the Empirical Evaluation of Law and Policy Do guns make us safer? Can mass shootings be stopped? What is the true cost of the war on drugs and is legalization the answer? Why does the US have the most prisoners in the world and what are the social ramifications? Did the legalization of abortion reduce crime in the 1990s? Did capital punishment? Is the criminal justice system racially biased? These are some of the questions we will address by reading major empirical studies evaluating the impact of law and policy in the arena of criminal justice. This course has been modified from my law school course so that it is accessible to those with little or no statistical or economic background but who are willing to grapple with the intuitions behind such studies, which will be a main focus of the course readings. The seminar should appeal to anyone interested in understanding core issues in criminal justice policy, the challenges in answering empirical questions with data, and the intuition behind the statistical techniques that define the credibility revolution in empirical evaluation. The goal is to help students be more aware that many beliefs and policy positions are based on factual premises for which the empirical support is weak or nonexistent, or even directly contradictory, and how better to empirically ascertain truths about the world and align them with our policy preferences. Successful completion of the course will enable students to more effectively understand and critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the empirical studies that constantly appear in the media and policy discourse, to comprehend the challenges in establishing true causal relationships in the fields of law, policy, and medicine, and to better understand how ideologues and motivated researchers contribute to the vast array of conflicting studies in these domains.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: Donohue, J. (PI)

LINGUIST 1: Introduction to Linguistics

This course introduces students to the cognitive organization of linguistic structure and the social nature of language use. We will investigate language as it is used in our everyday lives, highlighting both the variability and systematic nature of all levels of linguistic structure. In doing so, we will discover how to approach language from a scientific perspective, learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis, and understand the foundational concepts of the field of Linguistics. Sample topics to be explored across a variety of languages include language and advertising, language change, dialect variation, and language and technology. *** Sections are mandatory. Please sign up for one of the sections at enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 44N: Living with Two Languages

Preference to freshmen. The nature of bi- and multilingualism with emphasis on the social and educational effects in the U.S. and worldwide, in individual versus society, and in child and adult. The social, cognitive, psycholinguistic, and neurological consequences of bilingualism. Participation in planning and carrying out a research project in language use and bilingualism.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 63N: The Language of Comics

This seminar will explore language as represented in cartoons and comics such as Bizarro, Dilbert and Zits, how we interpret it, and why we find comics funny. We will explore and analyze language play, genderspeak and teenspeak; peeving about usage; new and spreading usages.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

LINGUIST 131: Language and Thought (PSYCH 131, PSYCH 262)

The psychology of language including: production and understanding in utterances; from speech sounds to speaker's meaning; children's acquisition of the first language; and the psychological basis for language systems. Language functions in natural contexts and their relation to the processes by which language is produced, understood, and acquired. Prerequisite: 1 or LINGUIST 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 134: Seminar on Language and Deception (PSYCH 134)

Deceptive, exploitative, and other noncooperative uses of language. How is language used to deceive or exploit? Where are these techniques practiced and why? What are the personal, ethical, and social consequences of these practices? Prerequisite: 131, LINGUIST 1, or PHIL 181.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 150: Language in Society

How language and society affect each other. Class, age, ethnic, and gender differences in speech. Prestige and stigma associated with different ways of speaking and the politics of language. The strategic use of language. Stylistic practice; how speakers use language to construct styles and adapt their language to different audiences and social contexts. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 156: Language and Gender (FEMGEN 156X)

The role of language in the construction of gender, the maintenance of the gender order, and social change. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No knowledge of linguistics required.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Garcia, G. (PI)
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