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301 - 310 of 363 results for: all courses

PUBLPOL 103D: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER

PUBLPOL 121L: Racial-Ethnic Politics in US (CSRE 121L, POLISCI 121L)

Why is contemporary American politics so sharply divided along racial and party lines? Are undocumented immigrants really more likely to commit crimes than U.S. citizens? What makes a political ad "racist?" The U.S. population will be majority-minority by 2050; what does this mean for future electoral outcomes? We will tackle such questions in this course, which examines various issues surrounding the development of political solidarity within racial groups; the politics of immigration, acculturation, and identification; and the influence of race on public opinion, political behavior, the media, and in the criminal justice system. Prior coursework in Economics or Statistics strongly recommended.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 124: American Political Institutions in Uncertain Times (POLISCI 120C)

This course examines how the rules that govern elections and the policy process determine political outcomes. It explores the historical forces that have shaped American political institutions, contemporary challenges to governing, and prospects for change. Topics covered include partisan polarization and legislative gridlock, the politicization of the courts, electoral institutions and voting rights, the expansion of presidential power, campaign finance and lobbying, representational biases among elected officials, and the role of political institutions in maintaining the rule of law. Throughout, emphasis will be placed on the strategic interactions between Congress, the presidency, and the courts and the importance of informal norms and political culture. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 120C.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bonica, A. (PI)

PUBLPOL 133: Political Power in American Cities (AMSTUD 121Z, POLISCI 121, URBANST 111)

The major actors, institutions, processes, and policies of sub-state government in the U.S., emphasizing city general-purpose governments through a comparative examination of historical and contemporary politics. Issues related to federalism, representation, voting, race, poverty, housing, and finances. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 121.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 168: Global Organizations: Accountability in non-profit organizations (PUBLPOL 268, SOC 168, SOC 268)

We learn how to apply analytical tools from the social sciences to organizations, and study how to design effective organizations and projects within and across institutional settings. A variety of organizations are included and how they deal with strategy changes and accountability. The theme for this year's class is on accountability of non-profit organizations such as Doctors Without Borders, The International Rescue Committee and The Red Cross. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED

REES 224A: The Soviet Civilization (HISTORY 224A, HISTORY 424A)

( History 224A is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 424A is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Socialist visions and practices of the organization of society and messianic politics; Soviet mass state violence; culture, living and work spaces. Primary and secondary sources. Research paper or historiographical essay.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

SOC 1: Introduction to Sociology

This course to get students to think like a sociologist; to use core concepts and theories from the field of sociology to make sense of the most pressing issues of our time: race and ethnicity; gender and sexuality; family; education; social class and economic inequality; social connectedness; social movements; and immigration. The course will draw heavily on the research and writing of Stanford¿s own sociologist.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 2: Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology (PSYCH 70)

Why do people behave the way they do? This is the fundamental question that drives social psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a variety of exciting issues including: what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; the effects of social influence and persuasion on individual thoughts, emotion, and behavior; and how the lessons of social psychology can be applied in contexts such as health, work, and relationships. The social forces studied in the class shape our behavior, though their operation cannot be seen directly. A central idea of this class is that awareness of these forces allows us to make choices in light of them, offering us more agency and wisdom in our everyday lives.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 15N: The Transformation of Socialist Societies

Preference to freshmen. The impact of societal organization on the lives of ordinary people in socialist societies and in the new societies arising through the processes of political, economic, and social transformation. Do the concepts of democratization and marketization suffice to characterize ongoing changes? Enrollment limited to 16.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

SOC 22N: The Roots of Social Protest

Preference to freshmen. The conditions under which social protest occurs and the emergence, success, and viability of contemporary social movements. Examples include women's civil rights, ecology, and antiwar and anti-globilization movements in the U.S. and elsewhere. Sociological theories to explain the timing, location, and causes of mobilization; how researchers evaluate these theories. Comparison of tactics, trajectories, and outcomes.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
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