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291 - 300 of 420 results for: all courses

PEDS 65N: Understanding Children's Health Disparities

The social and economic factors that affect children and their health status. The principal sources of disparities in the health of children in the U.S. are not biologic, but social and economic. Topics include ethnic, cultural, and behavioral factors that affect children's health, both directly and indirectly; lack of health insurance; and current proposals for health care reform, focusing specifically on how they will impact existing health disparities among children.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

PEDS 65Q: Understanding Children's Health Disparities

The social and economic factors that affect children and their health status. The principal sources of disparities in the health of children in the U.S. are not biologic, but social and economic. Topics include ethnic, cultural, and behavioral factors that affect children's health, both directly and indirectly; lack of health insurance; and current proposals for health care reform, focusing specifically on how they will impact existing health disparities among children. Includes instruction addressing written assignments and required oral presentations.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2012 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 99: Minds and Machines (LINGUIST 35, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 1, SYMSYS 200)

(Formerly SYMSYS 100). An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHIL 175A: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 24Q: Law and Order

Preference to sophomores. The role of law in promoting social order. What is the rule of law? How does it differ from the rule of men? What institutions best support the rule of law? Is a state needed to ensure that laws are enforced? Should victims be allowed to avenge wrongs? What is the relationship between justice and mercy?
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 25N: The US Congress in Historical and Comparative Perspective

This course traces the development of legislatures from their medieval European origins to the present, with primary emphasis on the case of the U.S. Congress. Students will learn about the early role played by assemblies in placing limits on royal power, especially via the power of the purse. About half the course will then turn to a more detailed consideration of the U.S. Congress's contemporary performance, analyzing how that performance is affected by procedural legacies from the past that affect most democratic legislatures worldwide.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 42Q: The Rwandan Genocide

Between April and July of 1994 more than 800,000 Rwandans, mostly Tutsi but also moderate Hutus, were killed in the most rapid genocide the world has ever known. The percentage of Rwandans killed in a single day of the genocide was ten times greater than the percentage of Americans killed in the entire Vietnam war. What could bring humans to plan and carry out such an orgy of violence? Could it have been prevented? Why did the United States or any other major power not intervene to stop the killing? To what extent should the United Nations be held accountable for the failure to end the genocide? What were the consequences of the genocide for the region of Central Africa? How did international actors respond to the challenges of reconstructing Rwanda after the killings? What has happened to the perpetrators of the genocide? This course surveys scholarly and journalistic accounts of the genocide to seek answers to these questions.nnThis seminar will be residence based in Crothers, but will be open to Crothers residents and non-residents.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2011 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 45N: Civil War Narratives

Preference to freshmen. Focus is on a new statistics-based theory to account for the susceptibility of countries to civil war. How to write a theory-based historical narrative. Students write and present an original historical narrative focusing on how well the theory explains a particular history and on the importance of factors that are absent from the theory in explaining civil war onsets.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2014 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 46N: Contemporary African Politics

Africa has lagged behind the rest of the developing world in terms of three consequential outcomes: economic development, the establishment of social order through effective governance, and the consolidation of democracy. This course seeks to identify the historical and political sources accounting for this lag, to provide extensive case study and statistical material to understand what sustains it, and to examine recent examples of success pointing to a more hopeful future. Students will be asked to develop expertise on one or two African countries and report regularly to fellow students on the progress (or lack thereof) of their countries on each outcome and the reasons for it.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Laitin, D. (PI)

POLISCI 101: Introduction to International Relations

The course provides an introduction to major factors shaping contemporary international politics, including: the origins and nature of nationalism; explanations for war; nuclear weapons and their impact of international politics; international implications of the rise of China; civil war and international peacekeeping since the end of the Cold War; understanding international institutions and how they facilitate interstate cooperation despite anarchy; and the politics of international environmental treaties.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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