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981 - 990 of 1010 results for: all courses

URBANST 114: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (ANTHRO 126)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. A majority of the world's population now live in urban areas and most of the rapid urbanization has taken place in mega-cities outside the Western world. This course explores urban cultures, identities, spatial practices and forms of urban power and imagination in Asia, Africa and Latin America.nParticipants will be introduced to a global history of urban development that demonstrates how the legacies of colonialism, modernization theory and global race thinking have shaped urban designs and urban life in most of the world. Students will also be introduced to interpretative and qualitative approaches to urban life that affords an understanding of important, if unquantifiable, vectors of urban life: stereotypes, fear, identity formations, utopia, social segregation and aspirations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

URBANST 123: Approaching Research and the Community (CSRE 146A)

Comparative perspective on research with communities and basic overview of research methodologies, with an emphasis on the principles and practices of doing community-based research as a collaborative enterprise between academic researchers and community members. How academic scholarship can be made useful to communities. How service experiences and interests can be used to develop research questions in collaboration with communities and serve as a starting point for developing senior theses or other independent research projects. Through the coursework, students are encouraged to develop a draft proposal for an actual community-based research project. The course is highly recommended for students planning to apply for community-based summer research fellowships through the Haas Center for Public Service (Community-based Research Fellowship Program). Students who complete the course will be given priority for these fellowships. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

URBANST 123B: Approaching Research in the Community: Design and Methods (CSRE 146B)

This course focuses on issues of research design and how to select specific methodological strategies to assure ethical and effective partnership-based research. In this course, students will plan for their own participation in a CBRF project. Topical themes will include best practice strategies for (a) defining and selecting community problems or issues to be addressed, (b) generating relevant and useful research questions, (c) choosing specific means and methods for data collection [e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc.], (d) storing, organizing and analyzing data, (e) reflecting on and critiquing research findings, and (f) carrying out dissemination in ways that can be expected to enhance community power and advance community development. Students will be provided with opportunities to workshop their respective projects-in-development, (e.g., developing and sharing research questions, data collection instruments, strategies for engaging community constituents as co-researchers, etc.). This is a required course for students participating in the Haas Center for Public Service Community-based Research Fellows Program, but enrollment is open to all Stanford students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

URBANST 124: Spatial Approaches to Social Science (ANTHRO 130D, ANTHRO 230D, POLISCI 241S)

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

URBANST 126: Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation (CSRE 162A, RELIGST 162X)

A life of engagement in social transformation is often built on a foundation of spiritual and religious commitments. Case studies of nonviolent social change agents including Rosa Parks in the civil rights movement, César Chávez in the labor movement, and WIlliam Sloane Coffin in the peace movement; the religious and spiritual underpinnings of their commitments. Theory and principles of nonviolence. Films and readings. Service learning component includes placements in organizations engaged in social transformation. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

URBANST 132: Concepts and Analytic Skills for the Social Sector (EARTHSYS 137)

How to develop and grow innovative not-for-profit organizations and for-profit enterprises which have the primary goal of solving social and environmental problems. Topics include organizational mission, strategy, market/user analysis, communications, funding, recruitment and impact evaluation. Perspectives from the field of social entrepreneurship, design thinking and social change organizing. Opportunities and limits of using methods from the for-profit sector to meet social goals. Focus is on integrating theory with practical applications, including several case exercises and simulations.One-day practicum where students advise an actual social impact organization. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite:consent of instructor. Email lalitvak@stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

URBANST 133: Social Enterprise Workshop (EARTHSYS 133)

Social Enterprise Workshop: A team based class to design solutions to social issues. In the class students will identify issues they are interested in, such as housing, food, the environment, or college access. They will join teams of like-minded students. Working under the guidance of an experienced social entrepreneur, together they will develop a solution to one part of their issue and write a business plan for that solution. The class will also feature guests who are leaders in the field of social entrepreneurship who will share their stories and help with the business plans. The business plan exercise can be used for both nonprofits and for-profits. Previous students have started successful organizations and raised significant funds based on the business plans developed in this class. There are no prerequisites, and students do not need to have an idea for a social enterprise to join the class. Enrollment limited to 20. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Scher, L. (PI)

URBANST 136: The Sharing Economy (PUBLPOL 136)

The rapid growth of the sharing economy, sometimes also called the peer to peer economy, is made possible by the ubiquity of smart phones, inefficiency of ownership, and measures designed to create and measure trust among participants. The course will explore not only the rapid rise of certain companies but also the shadow side of commercialized relationships. We will examine the economics and development consequences of the sharing economy, primarily with an urban focus, along an emphasis on the design of platforms and markets, ownership, the nature of work, environmental degradation and inequality.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

URBANST 137: Innovations in Microcredit and Development Finance (PUBLPOL 137)

The role of innovative financial institutions in supporting economic development, the alleviation of rural and urban poverty, and gender equity. Analysis of the strengths and limits of commercial banks, public development banks, credit unions, and microcredit organizations both in the U.S. and internationally. Readings include academic journal articles, formal case studies, evaluations, and annual reports. Priority to students who have taken any portion of the social innovation series: URBANST 131, 132, or 133. Recommended: ECON 1A or 1B.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

URBANST 138: Smart Cities & Communities

A city is essentially an organism, a complex system of systems and it inhabitants. A nexus of forces - IoT, data, systems of insight, and systems of engagement - present an unprecedented opportunity to increase the efficiency of urban systems, improve the efficacy of public services, and to assure the resiliency of the community against both chronic stresses and acute shocks.nnThe course will provide you with an understanding of the foundational elements of a smart city and address the breadth of systems that comprise it: built infrastructure, energy, water, transportation, food production/distribution, and public/social services. Case studies will be used to illustrate the approaches, benefits, and risks involved. It will discuss what IT can and cannot do, and most importantly given the control and privacy implications of many ¿smart¿ IT systems, what the smart city should and should not do. nnPanel discussions and guest speakers from the public sector and industry leading technology providers will give students an opportunity to engage with the architects and operators of Smart Cities.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
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