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851 - 860 of 965 results for: all courses

SOC 45Q: Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society (CSRE 45Q)

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

SOC 103A: WELFARE, WORK AND POVERTY. (CSRE 133J, JEWISHST 133A)

Early theorists of the welfare state described it as a reaction to the emergence of needs and interests of specific social groups during processes of economic development and change. Later theorists countered that the welfare state does not merely react to social cleavages during times of economic change but rather works to actively shape them, in line with worldviews or the interests of dominant group members. Adopting the latter approach, the goal of this course is to provide the tools and knowledge necessary for a critical evaluation of the social services provided to Israeli citizens and their impact on social and economic inequalities. The course will survey various approaches to the understanding of the goals of the welfare state. A comparative and historical account of the development of the welfare state will be presented, while highlighting recent developments, such as the increase in poverty rates and the aging of the population. During the course, we will examine the diverse needs that are served by the welfare state, as well as major dilemmas associated with the provision of services. Throughout the course, we will study critical thinking techniques and will use them for analyzing issues that are central for the development of social policies in Israel and the US.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SOC 105: The Sociology of Emotions

Although most of us think that feelings are deeply personal and private experiences, this seminar explores the social side of emotion¿including how they are socially learned, shaped, regulated, and distributed in the population as well as the consequences of emotion culture, emotion norms, emotional labor, and emotional deviance for individuals and society. We will consider specific emotions ¿ including jealousy, fear, sympathy, and happiness ¿ as well as more general patterns ¿ including the commercialization of emotion and the role of emotions in politics.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SOC 105VP: Contested markets in the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest (EARTHSYS 205VP, SOC 205VP)

Strategies of environmental movements to contain domestic and foreign corporations that are viewed as major perpetrators of rainforest devastation and the socio-economic degradation of this vast region. Topics: Origins, roles and inter-relations among corporations (zero deforestation agreements in soybean agriculture and cattle ranching), the development of environmental law and the efficacy of government and NGO movements¿ strategies, and whether this emerging economy shapes social classes, groups, tribes, family life to further embed inequality and immobility. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

SOC 107: China After Mao (SOC 207)

China's post-1976 recovery from the late Mao era; its reorientation toward an open market-oriented economy; the consequences of this new model and runaway economic growth for standards of living, social life, inequality, and local governance; the political conflicts that have accompanied these changes.
Last offered: Spring 2009 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 108: Political & Historical Sociology (SOC 208)

The differences between historical and sociological analysis of past events. The difference between constructing sociological explanations and describing past events. Topics include: the rise of Christianity, the mafia in a Sicilian village, the trade network of the East India Company.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 111: State and Society in Korea (INTNLREL 143, SOC 211)

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

SOC 112: Comparative Democratic Development (POLISCI 147)

Social, cultural, political, economic, and international factors affecting the development and consolidation of democracy in historical and comparative perspective. Individual country experiences with democracy, democratization, and regime performance. Emphasis is on global third wave of democratization beginning in the mid-1970s, the recent global recession of democracy (including the rise of illiberal populist parties and movements), and the contemporary challenges and prospects for democratic change.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

SOC 114: Economic Sociology (SOC 214)

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

SOC 115: Topics in Economic Sociology

How does a corporation¿s practice of religion affect your employment? How do your personal data become a corporation's private property? How does corporate behavior reinforce the marginalization of certain populations? The answers to these questions have varied as society's conceptualization of corporations evolved from simple, legal fiction to rights and responsibilities similar to those of humans. In this seminar, we critically examine relationships between corporations and citizens, and analyze the idea of corporation as citizen. Through careful reading, discussion, reflection, and writing, you will understand how corporations are socially constructed and in turn regulate social behavior. We will empower each other to thoughtfully question and possibly change our relationships with these major actors in economic sociology.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
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