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681 - 690 of 1170 results for: all courses

HISTORY 290: North Korea in a Historical and Cultural Perspective (HISTORY 390, KOREA 190X, KOREA 290X)

North Korea has been dubbed secretive, its leaders unhinged, its people mindless dupes. Such descriptions are partly a result of the control that the DPRK exerts over texts and bodies that come through its borders. Filtered through foreign media, North Korea's people and places can seem to belong to another planet. However, students interested in North Korea can access the DPRK through a broad and growing range of sources including satellite imagery, archival documents, popular magazines, films, literature, art, tourism, and through interviews with former North Korean residents (defectors). When such sources are brought into conversation with scholarship about North Korea, they yield new insights into North Korea's history, politics, economy, and culture. This course will provide students with fresh perspectives on the DPRK and will give them tools to better contextualize its current position in the world. Lectures will be enriched with a roster of guest speakers.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 291K: Korean History and Culture before 1900 (HISTORY 391K, KOREA 158, KOREA 258)

This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional more »
This course serves as an introduction to Korean culture, society, and history before the modern period. It begins with a discussion of early Korea and controversies over Korean origins; the bulk of the course will be devoted to the Chos'n period (1392-1910), that from the end of medieval Korea to the modern period. Topics to be covered include: Korean national and ethnic origins, the role of religious and intellectual traditions such as Buddhism and Confucianism, popular and indigenous religious practices, the traditional Korean family and social order, state and society during the Chos'n dynasty, vernacular prose literature, Korean's relations with its neighbors in East Asia, and changing conceptions of Korean identity.nThe course will be conducted through the reading and discussion of primary texts in English translation alongside scholarly research. As such, it will emphasize the interpretation of historical sources, which include personal letters, memoirs, and diaries, traditional histories, diplomatic and political documents, along with religious texts and works of art. Scholarly work will help contextualize these materials, while the class discussions will introduce students to existing scholarly debates about the Korean past. Students will be asked also to examine the premodern past with an eye to contemporary reception. The final project for the class is a film study, where a modern Korean film portraying premodern Korea will be analyzed as a case study of how the past works in public historical memory in contemporary Korea, both North and South. An open-ended research paper is also possible, pending instructor approval.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

HISTORY 292C: Gender in Modern South Asia (FEMGEN 292)

Gender is crucial to understanding the political, cultural, and economic trajectories of communities in colonial and postcolonial South Asia. Throughout this course, we will ask a series of questions: How does gender structure conceptions of home, community, and homeland in South Asia? How do gender and religion become represented in movements for nation-states? How does women's participation in anticolonial politics and fights for equal representation in postcolonial nation-states affect our understanding of gender in South Asia today? Readings examine the creation and impact of religious personal law under British colonial rule, the role of masculinity in the British-Indian army, perspectives on religion and clothing, the interplay of rights movements and anti-colonialism, and the status of women in postcolonial India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Students will also explore a range of primary sources, including political treatises, short stories, didactic manuals, autobiographies, and travelogues.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Akhter, M. (PI)

HISTORY 292D: Japan in Asia, Asia in Japan (HISTORY 392D)

( History 292D is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 392D is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) How Japan and Asia mutually shaped each other in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Focus is on Japanese imperialism in Asia and its postwar legacies. Topics include: pan-Asianism and orientalism; colonial modernization in Korea and Taiwan; collaboration and resistance; popular imperialism in Manchuria; total war and empire; comfort women and the politics of apology; the issue of resident Koreans; and economic and cultural integration of postwar Asia.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 292F: Culture and Religions in Korean History (HISTORY 392F)

This colloquium explores the major themes of Korean history before 1800 and the role of culture and religions in shaping the everyday life of Chosôn-dynasty Koreans. Themes include the aristocracy and military in the Koryô dynasty, Buddhism and Confucianism in the making of Chosôn Korea, kingship and court culture, slavery and women, family and rituals, death and punishment, and the Korean alphabet (Hangûl) and print culture.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 293C: Stateless in South Asia

Taking statelessness as more than a political condition, this course reviews the myriad aspects of statelessness. Exploring a few critical moments in modern South Asia (1945-2010), this seminar thematically follows the historical construction of statelessness in some of the most conflict-ridden theatres of world politics. This course explores the following questions: Is statelessness always a result of national and nationalist exclusion? What are the ways in which statelessness has amplified the gaps in the coherent rationale of national belonging?
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 296E: Modern South Asia, 1500- Present

This course examines the major political, social, religious, and cultural developments within early modern, colonial, and postcolonial South Asia. Topics include religious reform, the role of women, anticolonialism, and national formation. Students will be introduced to critical writings on the emergence of modernity on the Indian subcontinent.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 297F: Religion and Power in the Making of Modern South Asia (RELIGST 255, RELIGST 355)

This course examines the diverse ways that religious traditions have been involved in the brokering of power in South Asia from the late seventeenth century to the present day. We will examine the intersection of religion and power in different arenas, including historical memory, religious festivals, language politics, and violent actions. At the core of our inquiry is how religion is invoked in political contexts (and vice-versa), public displays of religiosity, and the complex dynamics of religion and the state. Among other issues, we will particularly engage with questions of religious identity, knowledge, and violence. Undergraduates must enroll in RELIGST 255 for 5 units. Graduate students must enroll RELIGST 355 for 3-5 units. HISTORY297F must be taken for 4-5 units.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 297G: Rulers, Reformers, Radicals: History of India in Two Centuries

This course traces the cultural, religious, literary, and political lineages of India during the last two centuries. It investigates the conditions and impact of colonialism in the formation of the contemporary subcontinent. In doing so, the course examines the ways in which Indians changed their society, culture, and identities as they became entwined with colonial, imperial, and global forces. Over the course of the quarter, we will address the following questions: What was the nature of colonial rule in India? How did the process of colonization shape questions of gender and class, race and caste in India? In societies as diverse as India, is anticolonialism synonymous with nationalism?
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 298C: Race, Gender, & Sexuality in Chinese History (ASNAMST 298, CSRE 298G, FEMGEN 298C, HISTORY 398C)

This course examines the diverse ways in which identities--particularly race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality have been understood and experienced in Chinese societies, broadly defined, from the imperial period to the present day. Topics include changes in women's lives and status, racial and ethnic categorizations, homosexuality, prostitution, masculinity, and gender-crossing.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Elmore, A. (PI)
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