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471 - 480 of 1086 results for: all courses

HISTORY 73S: History of the Police in the United States: Slave Patrols to Ferguson

How did police come to have the power to use violence? Themes: growth of professional policing, creation of private police forces and vigilantism, and public portrayals of police--by Hollywood and the press. The historical relationship between race and the administration of policing is a central question. Students will hone the methodology necessary to examine primary sources such as police memoirs, court records, police files, detective novels, music videos and photographs. The course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 78: Film and History of Latin American Revolutions and Counterrevolutions (FILMSTUD 178, HISTORY 178, ILAC 178)

Note: Students who have completed HISTORY 78N or 78Q should not enroll in this course. In this course we will watch and critique films made about Latin America's 20th century revolutions focusing on the Cuban, Chilean and Mexican revolutions. We will analyze the films as both social and political commentaries and as aesthetic and cultural works, alongside archivally-based histories of these revolutions.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 78Q: Film and History of Latin American Revolutions and Counterrevolutions

In this course we will watch and critique films made about Latin America's 20th century revolutions focusing on the Mexican, Cuban, Chilean and Nicaraguan revolutions. We will analyze the films as both social and political commentaries and as aesthetic and cultural works, alongside archivally-based histories of these revolutions.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 79C: The Ethical Challenges of the Climate Catastrophe (HISTORY 179C)

( History 79C is 3 units; History 179C is 5 units.) This course explores the ethical challenges of the climate catastrophe from historical, social, economic, political, cultural and scientific perspectives. These include the discovery of global warming over two centuries, the rise of secular and religious denialism and skepticism toward the scientific consensus on it, the dispute between developed and developing countries over how to forge a binding global agreement to mitigate it, and the "role morality" of various actors (scientists, politicians, fossil fuel companies, the media and ordinary individuals) in the US in assessing ethical responsibility for the catastrophe and how to mitigate, adapt, or even geoengineer, it.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 82G: Making Palestine Visible (CSRE 82G, HISTORY 182G)

Israel-Palestine is one of the most difficult subjects to talk about, in large part because we in the United States do not have much exposure to Palestinian history, culture, and politics in their own terms. This course aims to humanize Palestinians and asks why Palestinian claims to rights are illegible for much of the American public. We begin to answer this question by examining a broad sampling of history, structures of power and law, culture, and contemporary political issues.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 82S: Enemies Within: Hostile Minorities in Israel and Iraq in the 20th Century

This course explores the nation state in the Middle East through the perspectives of minority groups in Israel and Iraq. The class examines the origins of these two states since WWI, and considers the integral role that minority groups have played in their formation. Using an array of primary sources and methods of analysis, we will examine significant political, economic, social, and discursive trends in these states, while keeping in mind the broader regional and global contexts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Fahoum, B. (PI)

HISTORY 83S: Refugees of Palestine and Syria: History, Identity, and Politics of Exile in the Middle East

Mass displacements of Palestinians (1948, 1967) and Syrians (2011-) remain crucial to our understanding of history and politics of the modern Middle East. The course topics include the media's role in alleviating or worsening refugee crises, the Palestinian "right of return," and the place of religion in the Syrian civil war. By looking at autobiographies, graffiti, revolutionary posters, and music, we will study the construction of refugee identities, through the prism of race, ethnicity, statelessness, gender, and sexual orientation. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 85B: Jews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture (CSRE 85B, JEWISHST 85B, REES 85B)

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 86Q: Blood and Money: The Origins of Antisemitism (JEWISHST 86Q)

For over two millennia, Jews and Judaism have been the object of sustained anxieties, fears, and fantasies, which have in turn underpinned repeated outbreaks of violence and persecution. This course will explore the development and impact of antisemitism from Late Antiquity to the Enlightenment, including the emergence of the Blood libel, the association between Jews and moneylending, and the place of Judaism in Christian and Islamic theology. No prior background in history or Jewish studies is necessary. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, Writing 2

HISTORY 87: The Islamic Republics: Politics and Society in Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan

(Same as HISTORY 187. History majors and other taking 5 units, register for 187.) Explores the contested politics of these societies in modern times. Topics include controversies surrounding the meaning of revolution, state building, war, geopolitics, Islamic law, clerical authority, gender, an Islamic economy, culture, and ethnic, national and religious identities from the 1940s to the present. Assignments will focus on primary sources (especially legal documents, poetry, novels, and memoirs) and films.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Crews, R. (PI)
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