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331 - 340 of 990 results for: all courses

EMED 127: Health Care Leadership (EMED 227, PUBLPOL 227)

Healthcare Leadership class brings eminent healthcare leaders from a variety of sectors within healthcare to share their personal reflections and insights on effective leadership. Speakers discuss their personal core values, share lessons learned and their recipe for effective leadership in the healthcare field, including reflection on career and life choices. Speakers include CEOs of healthcare technology, pharmaceutical and other companies, leaders in public health, eminent leaders of hospitals, academia, biotechnology companies and other health care organizations. The class will also familiarize the students with the healthcare industry, as well as introduce concepts and skills relevant to healthcare leadership. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. Students taking the course Mondays and Wednesdays should enroll for 4 units (exceptions for a 3 unit registration can be made with the consent of instructor to be still eligible for Ways credit). Students taking the course on Wednesdays only should register for 2 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 52N: Mixed-Race Politics and Culture (AFRICAAM 52N, POLISCI 29N)

Today, almost one-third of Americans identify with a racial/ethnic minority group, and more than 9 million Americans identify with multiple races. What are the implications of such diversity for American politics and culture? In this course, we approach issues of race from an interdisciplinary perspective, employing research in the social sciences and humanities to assess how race shapes perceptions of identity as well as political behavior in 21st century U.S. We will examine issues surrounding the role of multiculturalism, immigration, acculturation, racial representation and racial prejudice in American society. Topics we will explore include the political and social formation of "race"; racial representation in the media, arts, and popular culture; the rise and decline of the "one-drop rule" and its effect on political and cultural attachments; the politicization of Census categories and the rise of the Multiracial Movement.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 115: Mapping the Grand Tour: Digital Methods for Historical Data (CLASSICS 115, HISTORY 238C, ITALIAN 115)

Classical Italy attracted thousands of travelers throughout the 1700s. Referring to their journey as the "Grand Tour," travelers pursued intellectual passions, promoted careers, and satisfied wanderlust, all while collecting antiquities to fill museums and estates back home. What can digital approaches tell us about who traveled, where and why? We will read travel accounts; experiment with parsing; and visualize historical data. Final projects to form credited contributions to the Grand Tour Project, a cutting-edge digital platform. No prior experience necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 121C: Superheroes, Supercops: American Police Power

Description: America has an obsession with superheroes and a problem with police--the last decade has been dominated by both blockbuster superhero films and negotiations over police power. This course will take an intersectional, interdisciplinary, and critical look at models of police power as they appear in superhero/supercop texts, including film, thinkpieces, novels for young readers, and comics, as well as a look at the historic foundations of American policing and contemporary police theory. What do superheroes teach us about police? And what do police teach us about superheroes? How can we read cultural production around this topic in a useful way? What constitutes propaganda, and what constitutes useful debate?
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 124: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 134: The Marriage Plot (FEMGEN 134)

The centrality of the marriage plot in the development of the British novel beginning in the 18th century with Samuel Richardson's Pamela and ending with Woolf's modernist novel Mrs. Dalloway. The relationship between novelistic plotting and the development of female characters into marriageable women. What is the relationship between the novel and feminine subjectivity? What aspects of marriage make it work as a plotting device? What kinds of marriages do marriage plots allow? Is the development of women's political agency related to their prominence in the novel form?
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 163F: Shakespeare Now and Then

In this Introduction to Shakespeare on film, we will study approximately five Shakespearean plays, including Romeo and Juliet, Much Ado About Nothing, and Macbeth, alongside a selection of their movie adaptations. As well as getting to grips with the plays printed texts, we will investigate how the plays meanings and significations can change radically in performance.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 165: Perspectives on American Identity (AMSTUD 160)

Required for American Studies majors. In this seminar we trace diverse and changing interpretations of American identity by exploring autobiographical, literary, and/or visual texts from the 18th through the 20th century in conversation with sociological, political, and historical accounts. *Fulfills Writing In the Major Requirement for American Studies Majors*
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 172D: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 180B: Reading Politics: The History and Future of Literacy

Reading is a political act. Through our major texts of Charles Dickens's Oliver Twist, Zora Neale Hurston¿s The Eatonville Anthology, and Azar Nafisi¿s Reading Lolita in Tehran, we will explore the classed, racialized, and gendered power dynamics of literacy and literature. How can books incite social revolutions? How can they maintain harmful inequalities? When is reading a tool of empowerment and when is it a tool of social control? We will examine these questions in a number of contexts, ranging from Victorian London, to the Jim Crow American South, from the Islamic revolution in Iran to a Silicon Valley proliferating with new forms of scientific, technological, and financial literacy. The course includes a significant service learning component, in which students will volunteer to tutor underprivileged readers through Bay Area literacy programs. Final projects will ask students to reflect on these tutoring experiences and consider the complex politics at work in the act of teaching someone to read.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Summer 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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