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301 - 310 of 1153 results for: all courses

EARTHSYS 112: Human Society and Environmental Change (EARTHSYS 212, ESS 112, HISTORY 103D)

Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 133: Social Enterprise Workshop (URBANST 133)

Social Enterprise Workshop: A team based class to design solutions to social issues. In the class students will identify issues they are interested in, such as housing, food, the environment, or college access. They will join teams of like-minded students. Working under the guidance of an experienced social entrepreneur, together they will develop a solution to one part of their issue and write a business plan for that solution. The class will also feature guests who are leaders in the field of social entrepreneurship who will share their stories and help with the business plans. The business plan exercise can be used for both nonprofits and for-profits. Previous students have started successful organizations and raised significant funds based on the business plans developed in this class. There are no prerequisites, and students do not need to have an idea for a social enterprise to join the class. Enrollment limited to 20. May be repeated for credit.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit

EARTHSYS 137: Concepts and Analytic Skills for the Social Sector (URBANST 132)

How to develop and grow innovative not-for-profit organizations and for-profit enterprises which have the primary goal of solving social and environmental problems. Topics include organizational mission, strategy, market/user analysis, communications, funding, recruitment and impact evaluation. Perspectives from the field of social entrepreneurship, design thinking and social change organizing. Opportunities and limits of using methods from the for-profit sector to meet social goals. Focus is on integrating theory with practical applications, including several case exercises and simulations.One-day practicum where students advise an actual social impact organization. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite:consent of instructor. Email lalitvak@stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Repeatable 10 times (up to 40 units total)

EARTHSYS 138: International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development (CEE 126, INTLPOL 274, URBANST 145)

(formerly IPS 274) Comparative approach to sustainable cities, with focus on international practices and applicability to China. Tradeoffs regarding land use, infrastructure, energy and water, and the need to balance economic vitality, environmental quality, cultural heritage, and social equity. Student teams collaborate with Chinese faculty and students partners to support urban sustainability projects. Limited enrollment via application; see internationalurbanization.org for details. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor(s).
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 154: Intermediate Writing: Communicating Climate Change: Navigating the Stories from the Frontlines (PWR 91EP)

In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will wri more »
In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will write and submit their article for publication.nnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 159: Economic, Legal, and Political Analysis of Climate-Change Policy (ECON 159, ECON 209, PUBLPOL 159)

This course will advance students understanding of economic, legal, and political approaches to avoiding or managing the problem of global climate change. Theoretical contributions as well as empirical analyses will be considered. It will address economic issues, legal constraints, and political challenges associated with various emissions-reduction and adaptation strategies, and it will consider policy efforts at the local, national, and international levels. Specific topics include: interactions among overlapping climate policies, the strengths and weaknesses of alternative policy instruments, trade-offs among alternative policy objectives, and decision making under uncertainty. Prerequisites: Econ 50 or its equivalent.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 160: Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)

Community-engaged learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. The focus will be on land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in remote team-based projects in collaboration with Bay Area community partners. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable 20 times (up to 100 units total)

EARTHSYS 168: Land Use: Planning for Equitable and Sustainable Cities (PUBLPOL 163, URBANST 163)

Approximately 80% of Americans live in urban areas (Source: Statista, 2019) and that percentage is growing. Take a moment to wonder what makes a city, why did it develop that way, and is that a good thing? Why are homes located in a specific area and businesses or factories located in another? How did someone decide where the roads would go, how much park or open space is available to play in and can you easily walk to a bus or train to get to your destination? Did cities develop fairly, equitably, and in a sustainable manner? Answering these questions begins with an exploration of land use, a seemingly technical term that refers to the relationship between humans and the built environment. While ¿land use¿ may not be part of your daily vernacular, everyone has experienced the power of its impact. nn nnThe goal of land use planning is to maximize the health, safety, and economic well-being of residents in ways that reflect the unique needs, desires, and culture of those who live and wo more »
Approximately 80% of Americans live in urban areas (Source: Statista, 2019) and that percentage is growing. Take a moment to wonder what makes a city, why did it develop that way, and is that a good thing? Why are homes located in a specific area and businesses or factories located in another? How did someone decide where the roads would go, how much park or open space is available to play in and can you easily walk to a bus or train to get to your destination? Did cities develop fairly, equitably, and in a sustainable manner? Answering these questions begins with an exploration of land use, a seemingly technical term that refers to the relationship between humans and the built environment. While ¿land use¿ may not be part of your daily vernacular, everyone has experienced the power of its impact. nn nnThe goal of land use planning is to maximize the health, safety, and economic well-being of residents in ways that reflect the unique needs, desires, and culture of those who live and work within the community. However, recent events have highlighted growing inequalities in American society. How have government decisions related to land use, growth, and development contributed to these growing inequalities, and can new approaches make society better? nn nnThis is an introductory course that will review the history and trends of land use policies, as well as address a number of current themes to demonstrate the power and importance of land use. Students will explore how urban areas function, how stakeholders influence land use choices, and how land use decisions contribute to positive and negative outcomes. nn nnThrough case studies, guest speakers, selective readings and interactive assignments, this survey course seeks to demystify the concept of land use for the non-city planner. By exploring the contemporary history of land use in the United States, students will learn how land use has been used as a tool for discriminatory redlining and NIMBYism. Students will learn about current land use planning efforts that seek to make cities more resilient and equitable to address issues like gentrification, environmental justice, and affordable housing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 194: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Introduction to Environmental Justice: Race, Class, Gender and Place (ENVRES 223, PWR 194EP)

This course examines the rhetoric, history and key case studies of environmental justice while encouraging critical and collaborative thinking, reading and researching about diversity in environmental movements within the global community and at Stanford, including the ways race, class and gender have shaped environmental battles still being fought today. We center diverse voices by bringing leaders, particularly from marginalized communities on the frontlines to our classroom to communicate experiences, insights and best practices. Together we will develop and present original research projects which may serve a particular organizational or community need, such as racialized dispossession, toxic pollution and human health, or indigenous land and water rights, among many others. Prerequisite: PWR 2
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

EASTASN 77: Divided Memories & Reconciliation: the formation of wartime historical memory in the Pacific (EASTASN 277)

Divided Memories will examine the formation of historical memory about World War Two in Asia, looking comparatively at the national memories of China, Japan, Korea, and the United States. It will also study efforts at reconciliation in contemporary Asia. The course will look at the role of textbooks, popular culture, with an emphasis on cinema, and elite opinion on the formation of wartime memory. We will study and discuss controversial issues such as war crimes, forced labor, sexual servitude, and the use of atomic weapons. Class will combine lectures with in class discussion, with short essays or papers.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Sneider, D. (PI)
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