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251 - 260 of 1106 results for: all courses

CSRE 142C: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice (AFRICAST 142, AFRICAST 242, INTNLREL 142)

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Kelly, K. (PI)

CSRE 146A: Designing Research for Social Justice: Writing a Community-Based Research Proposal (URBANST 123)

This course will support students in designing and writing a community-engaged research proposal. In contrast to "traditional" forms of research, community-engaged research uses a social justice lens in seeking to apply research to benefit communities most impacted. Community-engaged researchers also aim to challenge the power relationship between "researchers" and "researched" by working side by side with community partners in the design, conceptualization, and actualization of the research process. In this course, students will learn how to write a community-engaged research proposal. This involves forming a successful community partnership, generating meaningful research questions, and selecting means of collecting and analyzing data that best answer your research questions and support community partners. The course will also support students in developing a grounding in the theory and practice of community-engaged research, and to consider the ethical questions and challenges invol more »
This course will support students in designing and writing a community-engaged research proposal. In contrast to "traditional" forms of research, community-engaged research uses a social justice lens in seeking to apply research to benefit communities most impacted. Community-engaged researchers also aim to challenge the power relationship between "researchers" and "researched" by working side by side with community partners in the design, conceptualization, and actualization of the research process. In this course, students will learn how to write a community-engaged research proposal. This involves forming a successful community partnership, generating meaningful research questions, and selecting means of collecting and analyzing data that best answer your research questions and support community partners. The course will also support students in developing a grounding in the theory and practice of community-engaged research, and to consider the ethical questions and challenges involved. By the end of the course, students should have a complete research proposal that can be used to apply for a number of summer funding opportunities including the Chappell Lougee Scholarship, the Community-Based Research Fellowship, Cardinal Quarter fellowships, and Major Grants. Please note that completion of the course does not guarantee funding-- rather, the course supports you in learning how to write a strong community-engaged research proposal that you can use to apply to any number of fellowships). This course is also useful for students in any academic year who are interested in pursuing community-engaged theses or capstone projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Tien, J. (PI)

CSRE 146B: Approaching Research in the Community: Design and Methods (URBANST 123B)

This course focuses on issues of research design and how to select specific methodological strategies to assure ethical and effective partnership-based research. In this course, students will plan for their own participation in a CBRF project. Topical themes will include best practice strategies for (a) defining and selecting community problems or issues to be addressed, (b) generating relevant and useful research questions, (c) choosing specific means and methods for data collection [e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc.], (d) storing, organizing and analyzing data, (e) reflecting on and critiquing research findings, and (f) carrying out dissemination in ways that can be expected to enhance community power and advance community development. Students will be provided with opportunities to workshop their respective projects-in-development, (e.g., developing and sharing research questions, data collection instruments, strategies for engaging community constituents as co-researchers, etc.). This is a required course for students participating in the Haas Center for Public Service Community-based Research Fellows Program, but enrollment is open to all Stanford students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 147A: Race and Ethnicity Around the World (SOC 147, SOC 247)

(Graduate students register for 247.) How have the definitions, categories, and consequences of race and ethnicity differed across time and place? This course offers a historical and sociological survey of racialized divisions around the globe. Case studies include: affirmative action policies, policies of segregation and ghettoization, countries with genocidal pasts, invisible minorities, and countries that refuse to count their citizens by race at all.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 148R: Los Angeles: A Cultural History (AMSTUD 148)

This course traces a cultural history of Los Angeles from the early twentieth century to the present. Approaching popular representations of Los Angeles as our primary source, we discuss the ways that diverse groups of Angelenos have represented their city on the big and small screens, in the press, in the theater, in music, and in popular fiction. We focus in particular on the ways that conceptions of race and gender have informed representations of the city. Possible topics include: fashion and racial violence in the Zoot Suit Riots of the Second World War, Disneyland as a suburban fantasy, cinematic representations of Native American life in Bunker Hill in the 1961 film The Exiles, the independent black cinema of the Los Angeles Rebellion, the Anna Deaver Smith play Twilight Los Angeles about the civil unrest that gripped the city in 1992, and the 2019 film Once Upon a Time¿in Hollywood.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 149A: The Urban Underclass (SOC 149, SOC 249, URBANST 112)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 150A: Race and Crime (PSYCH 150, PSYCH 259)

The goal of this course is to examine social psychological perspectives on race, crime, and punishment in the United States. Readings will be drawn not only from psychology, but also from sociology, criminology, economics, and legal studies. We will consider the manner in which social psychological variables may operate at various points in the crimina; justice system- from policing, to sentencing, to imprisonment, to re-entry. Conducted as a seminar. Students interested in participating should attend the first session and complete online application for permission at https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 150S: Nineteenth Century America (AFRICAAM 150B, AMSTUD 150B, HISTORY 150B)

(Same as HISTORY 50B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI

CSRE 153C: Asylum: Knowledge, Politics, and Population (ANTHRO 153)

This course draws from ethnography, social theory, media and literature to examines the place of the asylum in the constitution of knowledge, politics, and populations. An ancient juridical concept, asylum has been used to describe a fundamental political right, medical and penal institutions, as well as emergent spaces of care and safety. As such, thus course invites students to think of critical issues associated with asylum, including: illness, trauma, violence, immigration, displacement, human rights, sanctuary, and testimony.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

CSRE 153R: Before the Model Minority: South Asians in the US (HISTORY 253P)

The model minority myth has been used to create a wedge between Asian and Black people in the United States, and masks the histories and lives of itinerant South Asian traders, laborers, and farmers. Beginning in the 1860s, South Asians (mostly male, and often undocumented) traveled to major ports in the US, such as New York City, New Orleans, and the California coast, where they found working-class jobs and married Puerto Rican, African American, Creole, and Mexican women. Some South Asians were double migrants, first brought to British colonies in the Caribbean and South America through indentured servitude, and later migrated to the United States. Their life stories expand to the racial history of the United States by looking beyond a Black/white binary. nnBy juxtaposing immigrant stories with exclusionary US immigration laws, the course touches upon major themes of migration, capitalism, surveillance, race and racism, multiracial couples and communities, resistance, intersectional more »
The model minority myth has been used to create a wedge between Asian and Black people in the United States, and masks the histories and lives of itinerant South Asian traders, laborers, and farmers. Beginning in the 1860s, South Asians (mostly male, and often undocumented) traveled to major ports in the US, such as New York City, New Orleans, and the California coast, where they found working-class jobs and married Puerto Rican, African American, Creole, and Mexican women. Some South Asians were double migrants, first brought to British colonies in the Caribbean and South America through indentured servitude, and later migrated to the United States. Their life stories expand to the racial history of the United States by looking beyond a Black/white binary. nnBy juxtaposing immigrant stories with exclusionary US immigration laws, the course touches upon major themes of migration, capitalism, surveillance, race and racism, multiracial couples and communities, resistance, intersectional activism, borderlands and cities in the US, and the formation of national identity. During the quarter, we will seek to connect experiences in the past with contemporary issues of political culture in the United States to engage with the continuing challenge of locating and attaining self-definition, justice, and social progress in a fraught and divided world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Akhter, M. (PI)
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