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CEE 118X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 224X, PUBLPOL 118X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

CEE 126: International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development (EARTHSYS 138, INTLPOL 274, URBANST 145)

(formerly IPS 274) Comparative approach to sustainable cities, with focus on international practices and applicability to China. Tradeoffs regarding land use, infrastructure, energy and water, and the need to balance economic vitality, environmental quality, cultural heritage, and social equity. Student teams collaborate with Chinese faculty and students partners to support urban sustainability projects. Limited enrollment via application; see internationalurbanization.org for details. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor(s).
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CEE 177L: Smart Cities & Communities (CEE 277L)

A city is comprised of people and a complex system of systems. Data provides the connective tissue between those systems. Smart cities use information technology (IT) to harness that data for operational efficiency, efficacy of government services, and sustainability. Key enablers covered include: IoT, open data, analytics, cloud and cognitive computing, and systems of engagement. System case studies will include: water, energy, transportation, buildings, food production, urban design, and social services. The evolving relationship between a city and its citizens as well as the risks / challenges of smart cities will also be explored.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CHILATST 14N: Growing Up Bilingual (CSRE 14N, EDUC 114N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CHILATST 125S: Chicano/Latino Politics (POLISCI 125S)

The political position of Latinos and Latinas in the U.S.. Focus is on Mexican Americans, with attention to Cuban Americans, Puerto Ricans, and other groups. The history of each group in the American polity; their political circumstances with respect to the electoral process, the policy process, and government; the extent to which the demographic category Latino is meaningful; and group identity and solidarity among Americans of Latin American ancestry. Topics include immigration, education, affirmative action, language policy, and environmental justice.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CHILATST 164: Immigration and the Changing United States (CSRE 164, SOC 164, SOC 264)

The role of race and ethnicity in immigrant group integration in the U.S. Topics include: theories of integration; racial and ethnic identity formation; racial and ethnic change; immigration policy; intermarriage; hybrid racial and ethnic identities; comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CHILATST 173: Mexican Migration to the United States (AMSTUD 73, HISTORY 73, HISTORY 173)

( History 73 is 3 units; History 173 is 5 units.) This class examines the history of Mexican migration to the United States. In the United States we constantly hear about Obama's immigration plan, the anti-immigrant laws in Arizona, and the courage of DREAM Activists; in Mexico news sources speak about the role of remittances, the effect of deportations, and the loss of life at the border. Unfortunately, few people truly understand the historical trends in these migratory processes, or the multifaceted role played by the United States in encouraging individuals to head there. Moreover, few people have actually heard the opinions and voices of migrants themselves. This course seeks to provide students with the opportunity to place migrants' experiences in dialogue with migratory laws as well as the knowledge to embed current understandings of Latin American migration in their meaningful historical context.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CHINA 91: Introduction to China

Required for Chinese and Japanese majors. Introduction to Chinese culture in a historical context. Topics include political and socioeconomic institutions, religion, ethics, education, and art and literature.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

CHINA 112: Tiananmen Square: History, Literature, Iconography (CHINA 212)

Multidisciplinary. Literary and artistic representations of this site of political and ideological struggles throughout the 20th century. Tiananmen-themed creative, documentary, and scholarly works that shed light on the dynamics and processes of modern Chinese culture and politics. No knowledge of Chinese required. Repeat for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit

CHINA 151: Popular Culture and Casino Capitalism in China (CHINA 251)

Examination of different forms of Chinese popular culture used to gauge or control fate and uncertainty, from geomancy and qigong to ghost culture and mahjong. Ways in which Chinese are incorporating these cultural forms into the informal economy to get rich quick: rotating credit associations, stock market speculation, pyramid schemes, underground lotteries, counterfeiting. Impact of casino capitalism on Chinese culture and social life today.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
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