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1001 - 1010 of 1177 results for: all courses

PUBLPOL 124: American Political Institutions in Uncertain Times (POLISCI 120C)

This course examines how the rules that govern elections and the policy process determine political outcomes. It explores the historical forces that have shaped American political institutions, contemporary challenges to governing, and prospects for change. Topics covered include partisan polarization and legislative gridlock, the politicization of the courts, electoral institutions and voting rights, the expansion of presidential power, campaign finance and lobbying, representational biases among elected officials, and the role of political institutions in maintaining the rule of law. Throughout, emphasis will be placed on the strategic interactions between Congress, the presidency, and the courts and the importance of informal norms and political culture. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 120C.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 127: Health Care Leadership (EMED 127, EMED 227, PUBLPOL 227)

Healthcare Leadership class brings eminent healthcare leaders from a variety of sectors within healthcare to share their personal reflections and insights on effective leadership. Speakers discuss their personal core values, share lessons learned and their recipe for effective leadership in the healthcare field, including reflection on career and life choices. Speakers include CEOs of healthcare technology, pharmaceutical and other companies, leaders in public health, eminent leaders of hospitals, academia, biotechnology companies and other health care organizations. The class will also familiarize the students with the healthcare industry, as well as introduce concepts and skills relevant to healthcare leadership. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit. Students taking the course Mondays and Wednesdays should enroll for 4 units (exceptions for a 3 unit registration can be made with the consent of instructor to be still eligible for Ways credit). Students also have an option of taking the course as a speaker seminar series for 2 units where they attend at least half the class sessions of their choice and complete short weekly assignments. Synchronous online instruction is available.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

PUBLPOL 133: Political Power in American Cities (AMSTUD 121Z, POLISCI 121, URBANST 111)

The major actors, institutions, processes, and policies of sub-state government in the U.S., emphasizing city general-purpose governments through a comparative examination of historical and contemporary politics. Issues related to federalism, representation, voting, race, poverty, housing, and finances. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 121.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 136: The Sharing Economy (URBANST 136)

The rapid growth of the sharing economy, sometimes also called the peer to peer economy, is made possible by the ubiquity of smart phones, inefficiency of ownership, and measures designed to create and measure trust among participants. The course will explore not only the rapid rise of certain companies but also the shadow side of commercialized relationships. We will examine the economics and development consequences of the sharing economy, primarily with an urban focus, along an emphasis on the design of platforms and markets, ownership, the nature of work, environmental degradation and inequality.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 141: Monitoring the Crisis (PSYCH 145A, SOC 141, SOC 241, URBANST 149)

A course devoted to understanding how people are faring as the country's health and economic crisis unfolds. The premise of the course is that, as important and valuable as surveys are, it's a capital mistake to presume that we know what needs to be asked and that fixed-response answers adequately convey the depth of what's happening. We introduce a new type of qualitative method that allows for discovery by capturing the voices of the people, learn what they're thinking and fearing, and understand the decisions they're making. Students are trained in immersive interviewing by completing actual interviews, coding and analyzing their field notes, and then writing reports describing what's happening across the country. These reports will be designed to find out who's hurting, why they're hurting, and how we can better respond to the crisis. Students interested should submit the following application: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfdOZsnpOCg4zTRbVny0ikxpZEd1AFEEJh3K9KjvINyfbW more »
A course devoted to understanding how people are faring as the country's health and economic crisis unfolds. The premise of the course is that, as important and valuable as surveys are, it's a capital mistake to presume that we know what needs to be asked and that fixed-response answers adequately convey the depth of what's happening. We introduce a new type of qualitative method that allows for discovery by capturing the voices of the people, learn what they're thinking and fearing, and understand the decisions they're making. Students are trained in immersive interviewing by completing actual interviews, coding and analyzing their field notes, and then writing reports describing what's happening across the country. These reports will be designed to find out who's hurting, why they're hurting, and how we can better respond to the crisis. Students interested should submit the following application: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfdOZsnpOCg4zTRbVny0ikxpZEd1AFEEJh3K9KjvINyfbWMGw/viewformnnThe course is open to students who have taken it in earlier quarters, with repeating students allowed to omit the training sessions and, in lieu of those sessions, complete additional field work and writing. Field work will include unique interviews with new participants each lab period, along with corresponding coding, analyses, and reports.
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

PUBLPOL 154: Politics and Policy in California

State politics and policy making, including the roles of the legislature, legislative leadership, governor, special interests, campaign finance, advocacy groups, ballot initiatives, state and federal laws, media, and research organizations. Case studies involving budgets, education, pensions, health care, political reform, environmental reforms, water, transportation and more. Evaluation of political actions, both inside and outside of government, that can affect California policy and social outcomes. Meetings with elected officials, policymakers, and advocates in class and during a day-long field trip to Sacramento.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 156: Health Care Policy and Reform (HUMBIO 122A)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 122A. Graduate students must enroll in PUBLPOL 156.) Focuses on U.S. health care policy. Includes comparisons with health care policy in other countries and detailed examinations of Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and proposed reforms. Examines health policy efforts at state, local, and local levels. The course includes sessions on effective memo writing as well as presentation and the politics of health policy and reform efforts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 159: Economic, Legal, and Political Analysis of Climate-Change Policy (EARTHSYS 159, ECON 159, ECON 209)

This course will advance students understanding of economic, legal, and political approaches to avoiding or managing the problem of global climate change. Theoretical contributions as well as empirical analyses will be considered. It will address economic issues, legal constraints, and political challenges associated with various emissions-reduction and adaptation strategies, and it will consider policy efforts at the local, national, and international levels. Specific topics include: interactions among overlapping climate policies, the strengths and weaknesses of alternative policy instruments, trade-offs among alternative policy objectives, and decision making under uncertainty. Prerequisites: Econ 50 or its equivalent.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 163: Land Use: Planning for Equitable and Sustainable Cities (AMSTUD 163, EARTHSYS 168, URBANST 163)

Approximately 80% of Americans live in urban areas (Source: Statista, 2019) and that percentage is growing. Take a moment to wonder what makes a city, why did it develop that way, and is that a good thing? Why are homes located in a specific area and businesses or factories located in another? How did someone decide where the roads would go, how much park or open space is available to play in and can you easily walk to a bus or train to get to your destination? Did cities develop fairly, equitably, and in a sustainable manner? Answering these questions begins with an exploration of land use, a seemingly technical term that refers to the relationship between humans and the built environment. While 'land use' may not be part of your daily vernacular, everyone has experienced the power of its impact. n nThe goal of land use planning is to maximize the health, safety, and economic well-being of residents in ways that reflect the unique needs, desires, and culture of those who live and work more »
Approximately 80% of Americans live in urban areas (Source: Statista, 2019) and that percentage is growing. Take a moment to wonder what makes a city, why did it develop that way, and is that a good thing? Why are homes located in a specific area and businesses or factories located in another? How did someone decide where the roads would go, how much park or open space is available to play in and can you easily walk to a bus or train to get to your destination? Did cities develop fairly, equitably, and in a sustainable manner? Answering these questions begins with an exploration of land use, a seemingly technical term that refers to the relationship between humans and the built environment. While 'land use' may not be part of your daily vernacular, everyone has experienced the power of its impact. n nThe goal of land use planning is to maximize the health, safety, and economic well-being of residents in ways that reflect the unique needs, desires, and culture of those who live and work within the community. However, recent events have highlighted growing inequalities in American society. How have government decisions related to land use, growth, and development contributed to these growing inequalities, and can new approaches make society better? n nThis is an introductory course that will review the history and trends of land use policies, as well as address a number of current themes to demonstrate the power and importance of land use. Students will explore how urban areas function, how stakeholders influence land use choices, and how land use decisions contribute to positive and negative outcomes. n nThrough case studies, guest speakers, selective readings and interactive assignments, this survey course seeks to demystify the concept of land use for the non-city planner. By exploring the contemporary history of land use in the United States, students will learn how land use has been used as a tool for discriminatory redlining and NIMBYism. Students will learn about current land use planning efforts that seek to make cities more resilient and equitable to address issues like gentrification, environmental justice, and affordable housing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PUBLPOL 172: Children, Youth, and the Law (HUMBIO 172B)

How the legal rights of children and adolescents in America are defined, protected, and enforced through the legal process within the context of their developmental needs and competing societal interests. Topics: origins and definitions of children's rights; adoption; custody; the juvenile justice system; education; freedom of speech; and sex. The class is interactive, using hypotheticals for discussion and analysis. A and B alternate; students may take one or both. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
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