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PHIL 1: Introduction to Philosophy

Is there one truth or many? Does science tell us everything there is to know? Can our minds be purely physical? Do we have free will? Is faith rational? Should we always be rational? What is the meaning of life? Are there moral truths? What are truth, reality, rationality, and knowledge? How can such questions be answered? Intensive introduction to theories and techniques in philosophy from various contemporary traditions. Once a week discussions will occur during scheduled meeting time (~50 minutes)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Lawlor, K. (PI)

PHIL 2: Introduction to Moral Philosophy (ETHICSOC 20)

What should I do with my life? What kind of person should I be? How should we treat others? What makes actions right or wrong? What is good and what is bad? What should we value? How should we organize society? Is there any reason to be moral? Is morality relative or subjective? How, if at all, can such questions be answered? Intensive introduction to theories and techniques in contemporary moral philosophy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

PHIL 11N: Skepticism

Preference to freshmen. Historical and contemporary philosophical perspectives on the limits of human knowledge of a mind-independent world and causal laws of nature. The nature and possibility of a priori knowledge. Skepticism regarding religious beliefs..
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

PHIL 60: Introduction to Philosophy of Science (HPS 60)

This course introduces students to tools for the philosophical analysis of science. We will cover issues in observation, experiment, and reasoning, questions about the aims of science, scientific change, and the relations between science and values.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

PHIL 61: Philosophy and the Scientific Revolution (HPS 61)

Galileo's defense of the Copernican world-system that initiated the scientific revolution of the 17th century, led to conflict between science and religion, and influenced the development of modern philosophy. Readings focus on Galileo and Descartes.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Friedman, M. (PI)

PHIL 74A: Ethics in a Human Life (ETHICSOC 174, HUMBIO 174A)

Ethical questions pervade a human life from before a person is conceived until after she dies, and at every point in between. This course raises a series of ethical questions, following along the path of a person's life - questions that arise before, during, and after she lives it. We will explore distinctive questions that a life presents at each of several familiar stages: prior to birth, childhood, adulthood, death, and even beyond. We will consider how some philosophers have tried to answer these questions, and we will think about how answering them might help us form a better understanding of the ethical shape of a human life as a whole.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ER

PHIL 76: Introduction to Global Justice (ETHICSOC 136R, INTNLREL 136R, POLISCI 136R, POLISCI 336)

Our world is divided into many different states, each of which has its own culture or set of cultures. Vast inequalities of wealth and power exist between citizens of the rich world and the global poor. International commerce, immigration, and climate change entwine our lives in ways that transcend borders. It is in this context that problems of global justice, which relate to the normative obligations that arise from our international order, emerge. What demands (if any) does justice impose on institutions and individuals acting in a global context? Is it morally permissible to prioritize the welfare of our compatriots over the welfare of foreigners? Do states have the right to control their borders? What are the responsibilities (if any) of wealthy states, consumers, and multinational corporations to the global poor? This course explores longstanding problems of global justice via a discussion of contemporary issues: global poverty, global public health, immigration, human rights and more »
Our world is divided into many different states, each of which has its own culture or set of cultures. Vast inequalities of wealth and power exist between citizens of the rich world and the global poor. International commerce, immigration, and climate change entwine our lives in ways that transcend borders. It is in this context that problems of global justice, which relate to the normative obligations that arise from our international order, emerge. What demands (if any) does justice impose on institutions and individuals acting in a global context? Is it morally permissible to prioritize the welfare of our compatriots over the welfare of foreigners? Do states have the right to control their borders? What are the responsibilities (if any) of wealthy states, consumers, and multinational corporations to the global poor? This course explores longstanding problems of global justice via a discussion of contemporary issues: global poverty, global public health, immigration, human rights and humanitarian intervention, self-determination, and climate change.n nThere are no easy answers to these questions, and the complexity of these issues requires an interdisciplinary approach. While there are several possible theoretical approaches to problems of global justice, the approach taken in this course will be rooted in political philosophy and political theory. We will combine readings from political philosophy and theory with empirical material from the social sciences, newspaper articles, and popular media. By the end of this course, students will be familiar with contemporary problems of global justice, be able to critically assess theoretical approaches to these problems, and be able to formulate and defend their own views on these complex issues.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas
Instructors: Soon, V. (PI)

PHIL 80: Mind, Matter, and Meaning

We'll cover three central topics in philosophy: personal identity; the metaphysics of mind; and the nature of belief. Readings will be drawn both from philosophy and from cognitive science more broadly. This is an intensive writing course that satisfies the writing in the major requirement for both Philosophy and Symbolic Systems. Students will submit five papers over the course of the quarter, and receive constructive feedback on each. Prerequisite: at least one other philosophy course, not including SYMSYS 1 / PHIL 99.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

PHIL 81: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ILAC 181, ITALIAN 181, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

PHIL 100: The History of Ancient Greek Philosophy (CLASSICS 40)

We shall cover the major developments in Greek philosophical thought, focusing on Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic schools (the Epicureans, the Stoics, and the Skeptics). Topics include epistemology, metaphysics, psychology, ethics and political theory. No prereqs, not repeatable.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
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