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241 - 250 of 1106 results for: all courses

CSRE 94: Topics in Writing and Rhetoric: Empathy, Ethics, and Compassion Meditation (PWR 194DH)

Does not fulfill NSC requirement. In this course, we'll extend this discussion by expanding our thinking about rhetoric as a means of persuasion to consider its relation to empathy-as a mode of listening to and understanding audiences and communities we identify with as well as those whose beliefs and actions can be lethal. We'll also practice compassion medication and empathetic rhetoric to see how these ethical stances affect us individually and investigate the ways they may and may not be scaled to address social justice more broadly. Finally, with the course readings and discussions in mind, you will explore a social justice issue and create an essay, a workshop, campaign or movement strategy, podcast, vlog, infographic, Facebook group, syllabus, etc. to help move us closer to positive change. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

CSRE 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, HUMRTS 112, INTNLREL 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Required weekly 50-min. discussion section, time TBD. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 108: Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (AMSTUD 107, FEMGEN 101, TAPS 108)

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 113V: Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s (AFRICAAM 113V, AFRICAST 113V, HISTORY 205D)

This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world(s), from the late 1400s to the 1800s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries. We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities (creolization), religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 120P: Poverty and Inequality in Israel and the US: A Comparative Approach (JEWISHST 131VP, SOC 120VP)

Poverty rates in Israel are high and have been relatively stable in recent decades, with about one fifth of all households (and a third of all children) living below the poverty line. In this class we will learn about poverty and inequality in Israel and we will compare with the US and other countries.nnIn the first few weeks of this class we will review basic theories of poverty and inequality and we will discuss how theories regarding poverty have changed over the years, from the "culture of poverty" to theories of welfare state regimes. We will also learn about various ways of measuring poverty, material hardship, and inequality, and we will review the methods and data used.nnIn the remaining weeks of the class we will turn to substantive topics such as gender, immigration, ethnicity/nationality, welfare policy, age, and health. Within each topic we will survey the debates within contemporary scholarship and we will compare Israel and the US. Examination of these issues will introduce students to some of the challenges that Israeli society faces today.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 121L: Racial-Ethnic Politics in US (POLISCI 121L, PUBLPOL 121L)

Why is contemporary American politics so sharply divided along racial and party lines? Are undocumented immigrants really more likely to commit crimes than U.S. citizens? What makes a political ad "racist?" The U.S. population will be majority-minority by 2050; what does this mean for future electoral outcomes? We will tackle such questions in this course, which examines various issues surrounding the development of political solidarity within racial groups; the politics of immigration, acculturation, and identification; and the influence of race on public opinion, political behavior, the media, and in the criminal justice system. Prior coursework in Economics or Statistics strongly recommended.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 122S: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health (AFRICAAM 132, HUMBIO 122S)

Examines health disparities in the U.S., looking at the patterns of those disparities and their root causes. Explores the intersection of lower social class and ethnic minority status in affecting health status and access to health care. Compares social and biological conceptualizations of race and ethnicity. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 133J: WELFARE, WORK AND POVERTY. (JEWISHST 133A, SOC 103A)

Early theorists of the welfare state described it as a reaction to the emergence of needs and interests of specific social groups during processes of economic development and change. Later theorists countered that the welfare state does not merely react to social cleavages during times of economic change but rather works to actively shape them, in line with worldviews or the interests of dominant group members. Adopting the latter approach, the goal of this course is to provide the tools and knowledge necessary for a critical evaluation of the social services provided to Israeli citizens and their impact on social and economic inequalities. The course will survey various approaches to the understanding of the goals of the welfare state. A comparative and historical account of the development of the welfare state will be presented, while highlighting recent developments, such as the increase in poverty rates and the aging of the population. During the course, we will examine the diverse needs that are served by the welfare state, as well as major dilemmas associated with the provision of services. Throughout the course, we will study critical thinking techniques and will use them for analyzing issues that are central for the development of social policies in Israel and the US.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 141: Gentrification (AFRICAAM 241A, URBANST 141)

Neighborhoods in the Bay Area and around the world are undergoing a transformation known as gentrification. Middle- and upper-income people are moving into what were once low-income areas, and housing costs are on the rise. Tensions between newcomers and old timers, who are often separated by race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation, can erupt; high rents may force long-time residents to leave. In this class we will move beyond simplistic media depictions to explore the complex history, nature, causes and consequences of this process. Students will learn through readings, films, class discussions, and engagement with a local community organization. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 141S: Immigration and Multiculturalism (POLISCI 141A)

What are the economic effects of immigration? Do immigrants assimilate into local culture? What drives native attitudes towards immigrants? Is diversity bad for local economies and societies and which policies work for managing diversity and multiculturalism? We will address these and similar questions by synthesizing the conclusions of a number of empirical studies on immigration and multiculturalism. The emphasis of the course is on the use of research design and statistical techniques that allow us to move beyond correlations and towards causal assessments of the effects of immigration and immigration policy.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
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