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11 - 20 of 1122 results for: all courses

AFRICAAM 58A: Egypt in the Age of Heresy (AFRICAST 58, ARCHLGY 58, CLASSICS 58)

Perhaps the most controversial era in ancient Egyptian history, the Amarna period (c.1350-1334 BCE) was marked by great sociocultural transformation, notably the introduction of a new 'religion' (often considered the world's first form of monotheism), the construction of a new royal city, and radical departures in artistic and architectural styles. This course will introduce archaeological and textual sources of ancient Egypt, investigating topics such as theological promotion, projections of power, social structure, urban design, interregional diplomacy, and historical legacy during the inception, height, and aftermath of this highly enigmatic period. Students with or without prior background are equally encouraged.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 58Q: American Landscapes of Segregation (AMSTUD 58Q, HISTORY 58Q)

This course examines various landscapes of segregation in U.S. history from 19th century reconstruction and settler expansion through the contemporary U.S. security state. Each week we consider different histories of segregation including native reservation and boarding school stories, Jim Crow and post-World War II urban/suburban segregation, school integration and bussing, and the rise of the carceral state. We will ask: How have Americans moved through space with different degrees of freedom and constraint over time, and how has that shaped what it has meant to be an American in different ways for different groups? How has access to land, property, consumer, recreational and educational spaces and resources been regulated by categories of race, gender, sexuality, colonial subjectivity, immigrant status and class? To gain a better sense of our local history, we will also consider how structures of segregation have historically mapped the Bay Area. Sources include primary and secondary historic texts, feature and documentary films, photography, and poetry.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 62Q: A Comparative Exploration of Higher Education in Jamaica (Anglo-Caribbean) and South Africa

How do developing (former colonized) nations feature in global conversations on the purpose of higher education in the Twenty-first Century and beyond? In this project-based seminar students will examine higher education systems in South Africa, and the Caribbean ¿ special emphasis on Jamaica. Together, we engage and explore fundamental questions such as: Is higher education purely a private good or a public good with private benefits? Are universities simply a means of social mobility in developing countries? What role does higher education play in the attainment of national development goals? How has student activism as evidenced by movements like #RhodesMustFall, #FeesMustFall in South Africa, and The Rodney Riots at the University of the West Indies (UWI) in Jamaica reshaped the higher education landscape and the national discourse.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Coates, C. (PI)

AFRICAAM 76B: The Social Life of Neighborhoods (CSRE 176B, SOC 176, SOC 276, URBANST 179)

How do neighborhoods come to be? How and why do they change? What is the role of power, money, race, immigration, segregation, culture, government, and other forces? In this course, students will interrogate these questions using literatures from sociology, geography, and political science, along with archival, observational, interview, and cartographic (GIS) methods. Students will work in small groups to create content (e.g., images, audio, and video) for a self-guided ¿neighborhood tour,¿ which will be added to a mobile app and/or website.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Stuart, F. (PI)

AFRICAAM 111: AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa (AFRICAST 112, AFRICAST 212)

Foreign aid can help Africa, say the advocates. Certainly not, say the critics. Is foreign aid a solution? or a problem? Should there be more aid, less aid, or none at all? Africa has developed imaginative and innovative approaches in many sectors. At the same time, many African countries have become increasingly dependent on foreign aid. How do foreign aid and local initiatives intersect? We will examine several contentious issues in contemporary Africa, exploring roots, contested analyses, and proposed solutions, examining foreign aid and the aid relationship. As African communities and countries work to shape their future, what are the foreign roles, and what are their consequences?
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 113V: Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s (AFRICAST 113V, CSRE 113V, HISTORY 205D)

This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world(s), from the late 1400s to the 1800s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries. We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities (creolization), religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 132: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health (CSRE 122S, HUMBIO 122S)

Examines health disparities in the U.S., looking at the patterns of those disparities and their root causes. Explores the intersection of lower social class and ethnic minority status in affecting health status and access to health care. Compares social and biological conceptualizations of race and ethnicity. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 140N: Visible Bodies: Black Female Authors and the Politics of Publishing in Africa (AFRICAST 51N, ENGLISH 54N, HISTORY 41N)

Where are the African female writers of the twentieth century and the present day? This Introductory Seminar addresses the critical problem of the marginalization of black female authors within established canons of modern African literature. We will explore, analyse and interrogate the reasons why, and the ways in which, women-authored bodies of work from this period continue to be lost, misplaced, forgotten, and ignored by a male-dominated and largely European/white publishing industry in the context of colonialism, apartheid and globalization. nnYou will be introduced to key twentieth-century and more contemporary female authors from Africa, some of them published but many more unpublished or out-of-print. The class will look at the challenges these female authors faced in publishing, including how they navigated a hostile publishing industry and a lack of funding and intellectual support for black writers, especially female writers. nnWe will also examine the strategies these write more »
Where are the African female writers of the twentieth century and the present day? This Introductory Seminar addresses the critical problem of the marginalization of black female authors within established canons of modern African literature. We will explore, analyse and interrogate the reasons why, and the ways in which, women-authored bodies of work from this period continue to be lost, misplaced, forgotten, and ignored by a male-dominated and largely European/white publishing industry in the context of colonialism, apartheid and globalization. nnYou will be introduced to key twentieth-century and more contemporary female authors from Africa, some of them published but many more unpublished or out-of-print. The class will look at the challenges these female authors faced in publishing, including how they navigated a hostile publishing industry and a lack of funding and intellectual support for black writers, especially female writers. nnWe will also examine the strategies these writers used to mitigate their apparent marginality, including looking at how women self-published, how they used newspapers as publication venues, how they have increasingly turned to digital platforms, and how many sought international publishing networks outside of the African continent. As one of the primary assessments for the seminar, you will be asked to conceptualize and design an in-depth and imaginative pitch for a new publishing platform that specializes in African female authors. nnYou will also have the opportunity for in-depth engagement (both in class and in one-on-one mentor sessions) with a range of leading pioneers in the field of publishing and literature in Africa. Figures like Ainehi Edoro (founder of Brittle Paper) and Zukiswa Wanner (prize-winning author of The Madams and Men of the South), amongst others, will be guests to our Zoom classroom. One of our industry specialists will meet with you to offer detailed feedback on your proposal for your imagined publishing platform. nnYou can expect a roughly 50/50 division between synchronous and asynchronous learning, as well as plenty of opportunity to collaborate with peers in smaller settings.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Cabrita, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 144: Living Free: Embodying Healing and Creativity in The Era of Racial Justice Movements (CSRE 44)

What does it mean to live free? It is often said that the one demand for the Movement for Black Lives is to "stop killing us." This demand has led Black artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodies. This surge of creativity has impacted and intersected with work happening in queer and trans communities and in many other communities of color, including indigenous movements for safe and clean water, student protests against campus racism, the undocumented movement, prison abolition among others.  This justice based work urges us to interrupt systems of violence with systems of healing that recover traditions, invent new modalities, and connect to survival practices developed by many generations of people in community.nnIn this course we will bring together leading artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodie more »
What does it mean to live free? It is often said that the one demand for the Movement for Black Lives is to "stop killing us." This demand has led Black artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodies. This surge of creativity has impacted and intersected with work happening in queer and trans communities and in many other communities of color, including indigenous movements for safe and clean water, student protests against campus racism, the undocumented movement, prison abolition among others.  This justice based work urges us to interrupt systems of violence with systems of healing that recover traditions, invent new modalities, and connect to survival practices developed by many generations of people in community.nnIn this course we will bring together leading artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodies, land, and natural resources. In this course we ask: what does it mean to embody health? How can we shift frameworks of pathology into frameworks of wholeness? What practices can we develop, recover, and share that help us create systems that support and value equity, healing and creativity for communities most at risk? And finally, how can we all live free?
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 145B: Africa in the 20th Century (HISTORY 145B)

(Same as HISTORY 45B. Students taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
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