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401 - 410 of 448 results for: all courses

RELIGST 37X: Contemporary Religion in Japan's Ancient Capital: Sustaining and Recasting Tradition

This course is being offered in collaboration with the Stanford Program in Kyoto, Bing Overseas Studies Program. Taught online, students will receive real-time instruction from Prof. Ludvik based in Kyoto on contemporary Japanese attitudes to religion and popular forms of religiosity in the context of the ancient capital of Kyoto, center of Japanese tradition and culture. Intersecting past and present, the city offers fascinating perspectives on time-honoured syncretic religious traditions in symbiosis with modern developments and the challenges they present. The course will examine various aspects and expressions of contemporary Japanese religion, including the pursuit of worldly benefits, religion and healing, fortune-telling, the popularity of ascetic practices and practitioners, pilgrimage, the enormous appeal of festivals (matsuri), the impact of tourism on religious sites, and the response of religion in times of crisis, such as natural disasters or COVID-19.
The course is offered remotely (online - synchronous) and enrollment is limited to 20 undergraduate students. A permission code will be given to admitted students to register in the class.
Interested students can apply by going to this Google form link by April 4: https://forms.gle/jDciz6YNKC3fvKNe9
Last offered: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

RELIGST 50: Exploring Buddhism

A comprehensive historical survey of the Buddhist tradition, from its beginnings to the 21st century, covering principal teachings and practices, institutional and social forms, and artistic and iconographical expressions. (Formerly RELIGST 14.)
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

RELIGST 61: Exploring Islam

This course introduces some of the most important features of the Islamic religious tradition. It explores the different ways in which Muslims have interpreted and practiced their religion. The main subjects of discussion --- including the life of the Prophet Muhammad, the Qur'an, law, ritual, mysticism, theology, politics, and art --- will be considered with reference to their proper historical contexts. Some of the topics covered include abortion, gender, rebellion and violence, and the visual vocabulary of paintings. Students will be exposed to important theories and methods in the academic study of religion. No prior knowledge is required.
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

RELIGST 86: Exploring the New Testament (CLASSICS 43, JEWISHST 86)

To explore the historical context of the earliest Christians, students will read most of the New Testament as well as many documents that didn't make the final cut. Non-Christian texts, Roman art, and surviving archeological remains will better situate Christianity within the ancient world. Students will read from the Dead Sea Scrolls, explore Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing divine temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse an ancient marriage guide, and engage with recent scholarship in archeology, literary criticism, and history.
Last offered: Summer 2021 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

RELIGST 114: Yoga: Ancient and Modern

In both Western popular culture and the Indian political arena, Yoga has become emblematic of the cultural heritage of India. But how did the phenomenon that is global postural yoga, with its secular wellness ethos and athleticism, come into existence? And how does it relate to the contemplative and ascetic disciplines that were practiced in the premodern Indian past? This course explores the early history of yoga through its philosophy and esoteric practices, concluding with a look at the ramifications of yoga in contemporary culture and politics. Participating in a yoga class is recommended. 2 units of independent study (S-NC) are offered for those who participate in a weekly yoga class and write short reflections on the experience.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

RELIGST 116: Buddhist Philosophy

Buddhism often figures in the popular imagination not as a religion, but as a philosophy, or a way of life. But why is such a distinction made? Does Buddhist thought and practice make sense as a philosophy? What do Buddhists actually mean when they say there is no self? Is this a philosophical claim? And what about the Buddhist arguments that everything is empty, projected by the mind, or the result of past karma? Is meditation on such theories philosophical practice? This course explores these and other questions by studying the perennial ideas that have made Buddhist traditions distinctive, the implications of these claims for living a meaningful life, and how these ideas and their associated practices have been received in contemporary secularized societies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Gentry, J. (PI)

RELIGST 117: Christianity, Race, and Gender in 21st-century America (AMSTUD 117R)

As the largest religion practiced in the United States, Christianity not only shapes the private lives of a large number of Americans but also plays an important role in public discourse, policies, and debates. This course investigates Christianity's place on the shifting religious landscape in America, with special attention to present-day movements for racial and gender justice in the era of Black Lives Matter and #MeToo. Students explore reasons for declining numbers of Christians in the United States, the polarization of Christian conservatives and religious "nones," and Christian constructions of social relations. How do Christian beliefs and practices shape attitudes about race and gender roles? How is contemporary Christianity acting as a force for as well as a barrier to social justice? This course assumes no background in the study of religion, race, or gender and is open to practitioners of all faiths or none.
Last offered: Summer 2021 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

RELIGST 119: Religion and Conflict

Conflicts involving religions are among the most vexing challenges facing international agencies, governments, institutions, and - above all - humanity. Although religion is often used as a descriptor of a conflict (Jewish - Muslim conflict in the Middle East, Christian-Muslim conflict in Sudan, Catholic-Protestant conflict in Northern Ireland) the impact of religion on creating and resolving these disputes is not well understood. It is indeed difficult, and at times impossible or undesirable, to separate religious from economic, political, agricultural, environmental, and cultural factors. This class will give students an opportunity to delve deeply into the histories, causes, and cultures involved in religious conflict. We will also challenge the assumption that different religions or particular religions are prone to conflict or tend towards violence. By studying resolutions to conflicts and looking at cases of inter-religious dialogue and cooperation, students will be able to count more »
Conflicts involving religions are among the most vexing challenges facing international agencies, governments, institutions, and - above all - humanity. Although religion is often used as a descriptor of a conflict (Jewish - Muslim conflict in the Middle East, Christian-Muslim conflict in Sudan, Catholic-Protestant conflict in Northern Ireland) the impact of religion on creating and resolving these disputes is not well understood. It is indeed difficult, and at times impossible or undesirable, to separate religious from economic, political, agricultural, environmental, and cultural factors. This class will give students an opportunity to delve deeply into the histories, causes, and cultures involved in religious conflict. We will also challenge the assumption that different religions or particular religions are prone to conflict or tend towards violence. By studying resolutions to conflicts and looking at cases of inter-religious dialogue and cooperation, students will be able to counter stereotypes and move beyond the rhetoric surrounding religion and conflict. The course will be both theoretical and practical. We will study how religious conflicts have been addressed academically and in policy discussions. We will also explore how religious beliefs, institutions, and actors have exacerbated or mitigated conflicts and facilitated or thwarted their resolutions. To illustrate these theories each section is accompanied by an examination of particular case studies of religious conflicts, some resolved and others ongoing, and efforts at religious peacebuilding, some successful and others not. Each student will then produce her or his own case study of a conflict or a comparison of conflicts as a final project.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
Instructors: Bigelow, A. (PI)

RELIGST 125: The Bible and its Interpreters

Introduction to major stories, figures, and themes of the Christian Bible and their retellings in theological writing, art, literature, film, and music throughout the ages.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Pitkin, B. (PI)

RELIGST 126: Protestant Reformation (HISTORY 126B)

The emergence of Protestant Christianity in 16th-century Europe. Analysis of writings by evangelical reformers (Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, Sattler, Hubmeier, Müntzer) and study of reform movements (Lutheran, Reformed, Anabaptist, Spiritualist) in their medieval context and as expressions of new and influential visions of Christian belief, life, social order.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
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