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RELIGST 230X: Religion, Radicalization and Media in Africa since 1945 (AFRICAST 248, AFRICAST 348, HISTORY 248, HISTORY 348, RELIGST 330X)

What are the paths to religious radicalization, and what role have media- new and old- played in these conversion journeys? We examine how Pentecostal Christians and Reformist Muslims in countries such as South Africa, Nigeria, Sudan, and Ethiopia have used multiple media forms- newspapers, cell phones, TV, radio, and the internet- to gain new converts, contest the authority of colonial and post-colonial states, construct transnational communities, and position themselves as key political players.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Cabrita, J. (PI)

RELIGST 246: Constructing Race and Religion in America (AFRICAAM 236, AMSTUD 246, CSRE 246, HISTORY 256G, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 346)

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

RELIGST 255: Religion and Power in the Making of Modern South Asia (HISTORY 297F, RELIGST 355)

This course examines the diverse ways that religious traditions have been involved in the brokering of power in South Asia from the late seventeenth century to the present day. We will examine the intersection of religion and power in different arenas, including historical memory, religious festivals, language politics, and violent actions. At the core of our inquiry is how religion is invoked in political contexts (and vice-versa), public displays of religiosity, and the complex dynamics of religion and the state. Among other issues, we will particularly engage with questions of religious identity, knowledge, and violence. Undergraduates must enroll in RELIGST 255 for 5 units. Graduate students must enroll RELIGST 355 for 3-5 units. HISTORY297F must be taken for 4-5 units.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

RELIGST 262: Sex and the Early Church (CLASSICS 262, FEMGEN 262, RELIGST 362)

Sex and the Early Church examines the ways first- through sixth-century Christians addressed questions regarding human sexuality. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between sexuality and issues of gender, culture, power, and resistance. We will read a Roman gynecological manual, an ancient dating guide, the world's first harlequin romance novels, ancient pornography, early Christian martyrdom accounts, stories of female and male saints, instructions for how to best battle demons, visionary accounts, and monastic rules. These will be supplemented by modern scholarship in classics, early Christian studies, gender studies, queer studies, and the history of sexuality. The purpose of our exploration is not simply to better understand ancient views of gender and sexuality. Rather, this investigation of a society whose sexual system often seems so surprising aims to denaturalize many of our own assumptions concerning gender and sexuality. In the process, we will also examine the ways these first centuries of what eventually became the world's largest religious tradition has profoundly affected the sexual norms of our own time. The seminar assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the bible, or ancient history.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

RELIGST 264: Hindu Tantra (RELIGST 364)

What is Tantra? Tantric forms of ritual and philosophy have been integral to the practice of Hinduism for most of its history. Tantra has provided initiates with a spiritual technology for embodying the divine and transcending the cycle of rebirth; on a social and political level, Tantra has mediated the institutions of Hindu kingship and appealed to a diverse population of initiates. This course covers a number of influential and well-documented Hindu tantric traditions, exploring several prominent features of Tantric religion as they develop historically, including: tantric ritual practice (core technologies of the subtle body, mantras, ma, alas, etc., along with the more notorious elements of sex and transgression), theology and philosophical speculation, as well as Tantra's relationship to the outside world and state power.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

RELIGST 281: Asian Religions in America; Asian American Religions (AMSTUD 281, ASNAMST 281, RELIGST 381)

This course will analyze both the reception in America of Asian religions (i.e. of Buddhism in the 19th century), and the development in America of Asian American religious traditions.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

SINY 148: Grappling with the Global: Gentrification, Immigration, and Sustainability in New York City

This course will examine the impacts of gentrification, immigration, and global environmental concerns on place-making in New York City, deploying ethnographic fieldwork and first-hand accounts of everyday urban life as tools to document and understand urban change.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

SINY 154: Improvised Music in New York City: 1959-2019

This course will introduce you to the sounds and practices of improvised music and to some of today's key improvising musicians who live and work in New York City.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

SINY 158: Mapping the Infinite City: Exploring New York's Immigrant Worlds

With field-trips allied to visits from the experts whose work is featured in Nonstop Metropolis¿linguists and demographers, activists and artists, scholars of race and of history¿this course will open our eyes to the splendid feast of the city's immigrant neighborhoods, the ¿gorgeous mosaic,¿ and explore the complex issues involved in immigration and city life. We will investigate the many ways that ¿a sense of place,¿ even in our globalizing age, remains crucial to residents of the city's neighborhoods¿and to all people everywhere.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

SINY 166: Just Art? Equity, Immigration and Art in the Global City

This course focuses on relations between art, immigration and equity. Through several case studies, we will learn to think critically about how aesthetics and politics work together. In addition to studying particular works of art, we will travel to several foundations and institutions to learn about their strategies for fostering equity and the arts. How do art, activism and racial justice connect in performances aimed at changing ideas? How do major arts institutions address questions of equity and difference? We will discuss how art can function as a form of aesthetic knowledge in the service of justice. In doing so, we will grapple with the role of the creative arts in mitigating social change and study artists who have sought to intervene in the restrictive covenants of racial, gender and other segregationist or national orders. Our case studies will shift across media, subjects, objects and temporalities. From artists in New York responding to the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima an more »
This course focuses on relations between art, immigration and equity. Through several case studies, we will learn to think critically about how aesthetics and politics work together. In addition to studying particular works of art, we will travel to several foundations and institutions to learn about their strategies for fostering equity and the arts. How do art, activism and racial justice connect in performances aimed at changing ideas? How do major arts institutions address questions of equity and difference? We will discuss how art can function as a form of aesthetic knowledge in the service of justice. In doing so, we will grapple with the role of the creative arts in mitigating social change and study artists who have sought to intervene in the restrictive covenants of racial, gender and other segregationist or national orders. Our case studies will shift across media, subjects, objects and temporalities. From artists in New York responding to the nuclear bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, to the radical work of Yayoi Kusama¿s 1960s performances, to a plays about immigration such as Lynn Nottage¿s Intimate Apparel and Lin Manuel Miranda¿s Hamilton¿the latter a show that exemplifies how art, activism and racial justice come together--the cross-cast musical gave paid opportunities and leading parts to a full cast of performers of color while also recasting the history of immigration in the United States and produced a new form of hip hop. We will read work by James Baldwin and more! We will visit the Tenement Museum as well as the Schomburg museum and archive and meet with current curators and arts professionals from across the city.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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