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611 - 620 of 802 results for: all courses

NATIVEAM 39: Long Live Our 4Bil. Year Old Mother: Black Feminist Praxis, Indigenous Resistance, Queer Possibility (AFRICAAM 39, CSRE 39, FEMGEN 39)

How can art facilitate a culture that values women, mothers, transfolks, caregivers, girls? How can black, indigenous, and people of color frameworks help us reckon with oppressive systems that threaten safety and survival for marginalized people and the lands that sustain us? How can these questions reveal the brilliant and inventive forms of survival that precede and transcend harmful systems toward a world of possibility? Each week, this course will call on artists, scholars, and organizers of color who clarify the urgency and interconnection of issues from patriarchal violence to environmental degradation; criminalization to legacies of settler colonialism. These same thinkers will also speak to the imaginative, everyday knowledge and creative healing practices that our forebears have used for millennia to give vision and rise to true transformation.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

NATIVEAM 103S: Gender in Native American Societies (CSRE 103S, FEMGEN 103S)

Seminar examines the impact of colonialism on gender roles & gender relations in American Indian communities beginning with the 17th century to the present. Topics include demographic changes; social, political & economic transformations associated with biological & spiritual assaults; the dynamism & diversity of native societies. Sources include history, ethnography, biography, autobiography, the novel & film.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED

NATIVEAM 115: Introduction to Native American History

This course incorporates a Native American perspective in the assigned readings and is an introduction to Native American History from contact with Europeans to the present. History, from a Western perspective, is secular and objectively evaluative whereas for most Indigenous peoples, history is a moral endeavor (Walker, Lakota Society 113). A focus in the course is the civil rights era in American history when Native American protest movements were active. Colonization and decolonization, as they historically occurred are an emphasis throughout the course using texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century in addition to the main text. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and one longer paper that is summarized in a 15-20 minute presentation on a topic of interest relating to the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

NATIVEAM 117S: History of Native Americans in California (CSRE 117S, HISTORY 250A)

This course examines the political histories and cultural themes of Native Americans in California, 1700s1950s. Throughout the semester we will focus on: demographics, diversity of tribal cultures; regional environmental backgrounds; the Spanish Era and missionization; the Mexican Era and secularization; relations with the United States Government and the State of California, including the gold rush period, statehood, unratified treaties, origin of reservations/rancherias, and other federal policies, e.g., Allotment Act, Indian Reorganization Act and termination.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED
Instructors: Anderson, J. (PI)

NATIVEAM 118: Heritage, Environment, and Sovereignty in Hawaii (CSRE 118E, EARTHSYS 118)

This course explores the cultural, political economic, and environmental status of contemporary Hawaiians. What sorts of sustainable economic and environmental systems did Hawaiians use in prehistory? How was colonization of the Hawaiian Islands informed and shaped by American economic interests and the nascent imperialsm of the early 20th centrury? How was sovereignty and Native Hawaiian identity been shaped by these forces? How has tourism and the leisure industry affected the natural environment? This course uses archaeological methods, ethnohistorical sources, and historical analysis in an exploration of contemporary Hawaiian social economic and political life.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

NATIVEAM 119S: The History of Native Americans of California (EDUC 119S, EDUC 429S)

How the federal government placed education at the center of its Indian policy in second half of 19th century, subjecting Native Americans to programs designed to erase native cultures and American Indian responses to those programs. Topics include traditional Indian education, role of religious groups, Meriam Report, Navajo-Hopi Rehabilitation Act, Johnson-O'Malley Act, and public schools.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

OSPAUSTL 40: Australian Studies: History, Society and Culture Down Under

Introduction to Australian society, history, culture, politics, and identity. Social and cultural framework and working understanding of Australia in relationship to the focus on coastal environment in other program courses. Field trips.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPBER 83: Refugees and Germany

History and lived experience of refugees, both those who have fled from and to Germany, in the twentieth and twenty-first century. Visits to relevant sites in Berlin, meetings with refugees and experts on this topic, and readings to provide context. Participants write a journal; option for creative writing, either fiction or creative non-fiction.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPBER 86: The Integration of Refugees in Europe: German Education Settings

Experiences of refugees as they enter German secondary and post-secondary education settings. Using a social-psychological lens, learn how refugees understand their experiences in German schools and interactions with native students and teachers; how they are seen and treated; barriers to better relationships and outcomes; and how these can be overcome. Learn from popular commentary reports; scholarly writings from social-psychology and related fields on diversity, bias, belonging, and psychologically "wise" interventions. Experiential learning opportunities, including conversations with refugee students and educators working with refugees.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPBER 174: Sports, Culture, and Gender in Comparative Perspective

Theory and history of mass spectator sports and their role in modern societies. Comparisons with U.S., Britain, and France; the peculiarities of sports in German culture. Body and competition cultures, with emphasis on the entry of women into sports, the modification of body ideals, and the formation and negotiation of gender identities in and through sports. The relationship between sports and politics, including the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games. In German. Prerequisite: completion of GERLANG 3 or equivalent.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED
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