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551 - 560 of 802 results for: all courses

ILAC 149: The Laboring of Diaspora & Border Literary Cultures (COMPLIT 149, CSRE 149)

Focus is given to emergent theories of culture and on comparative literary and cultural studies. How do we treat culture as a social force? How do we go about reading the presence of social contexts within cultural texts? How do ethno-racial writers re-imagine the nation as a site with many "cognitive maps" in which the nation-state is not congruent with cultural identity? How do diaspora and border narratives/texts strive for comparative theoretical scope while remaining rooted in specific local histories. Note: This course must be taken for a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit. In AY 2020-21, a "CR" grade will satisfy the WAYS requirement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Saldivar, J. (PI)

ILAC 161: Modern Latin American Literature

From independence to the present. A survey of significant authors and works of Hispanic and Brazilian Portuguese literatures, focusing on fictional prose and poetry. Topics include romantic allegories of the nation; modernism and postmodernism; avant-garde poetry; regionalism versus cosmopolitanism; indigenous and indigenist literature; magical realism and the literature of the boom; Afro-Hispanic literature; and testimonial narrative. Authors may include: Bolívar, Bello, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Sarmiento, Machado de Assis, Darío, Martí­, Agustini, Vallejo, Huidobro, Borges, Cortázar, Neruda, Guillon, Rulfo, Ramos, Garcí­a Marquez, Lispector, and Bolaño. As a Writing in the Major (WIM) course, ILAC 161 provides structured opportunities for ILAC and Spanish majors to gradually develop their scholarly writing skills in Spanish. This component of the course is optional for non-majors. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 220E: Renaissance Africa (AFRICAST 220E, COMPLIT 220, ILAC 320E)

Literature and Portuguese expansion into Africa during the sixteenth century. Emphasis on forms of exchange between Portuguese and Africans in Morocco, Angola/Congo, South Africa, the Swahili Coast, and Ethiopia. Readings in Portuguese and English. Taught in English.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 243: Latin American Aesthetics

As the branch of philosophy that deals with the principles of beauty and artistic taste, aesthetics is, purportedly, universal. The course interrogates its conspicuous omission of Latin American theorization and cultural production. Three thematic axes are vanguardia, colonialidad, and populismo; a central concern is aesthetic responses to precariousness. Argentine, Brazilian, Chilean, Colombian, and Cuban essayism and visual arts from the mid 20th century to the present, notably origenismo, neo-baroque, and indigenismo. In collaboration with a cognate course at UC Berkeley. Taught in Spanish.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 277: Senior Seminar: Horror, Gothic, and Fantasy in Spanish

In this course we delve into stories and film where realism is put to the test. From vampires in Havana to mysterious children in Buenos Aires, we work with a constellation of writers who shape minor genres into masterpieces. We'll map the ways in which these narratives work with form (against literary or cinematic realism), affect (eliciting emotional responses), and adaptation (as translations or dislocations of genre, gender, geography, time, and modes of production). The selection includes Bombal, Quiroga, Borges, Cortázar, Lispector, Ocampo, Enríquez, Schweblin, Sandoval, and Del Toro, among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

INTNLREL 60Q: United Nations Peacekeeping (PEDS 60Q)

Focus is on an examination of United Nations peacekeeping, from its inception in 1956 in the wake of the Suez Crisis, to its increasingly important role as an enforcer of political stability in sub-Saharan Africa. Examines the practice of "classic" peacekeeping as it developed during the Cold War, the rise and fall of "second-generation" peacekeeping, and the reemergence of a muscular form of peacekeeping in sub-Saharan Africa more recently. Topics include the basic history of the United Nations since 1945, he fundamentals of the United Nations Charter, and the historical trajectory of U.N. peaeckeeping and the evolving arguments of its proponents and critics over the years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

INTNLREL 140C: The U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War (HISTORY 201C, INTNLREL 140X)

The involvement of U.S. and the UN in major wars and international interventions since the 1991 Gulf War. The UN Charter's provisions on the use of force, the origins and evolution of peacekeeping, the reasons for the breakthrough to peacemaking and peace enforcement in the 90s, and the ongoing debates over the legality and wisdom of humanitarian intervention. Case studies include Croatia and Bosnia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, East Timor, and Afghanistan. *International Relations majors taking this course to fulfill the WiM requirement should enroll in INTNLREL 140C for 5 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 140X: The U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War (HISTORY 201C, INTNLREL 140C)

The involvement of U.S. and the UN in major wars and international interventions since the 1991 Gulf War. The UN Charter's provisions on the use of force, the origins and evolution of peacekeeping, the reasons for the breakthrough to peacemaking and peace enforcement in the 90s, and the ongoing debates over the legality and wisdom of humanitarian intervention. Case studies include Croatia and Bosnia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, East Timor, and Afghanistan. *International Relations majors taking this course to fulfill the WiM requirement should enroll in INTNLREL 140C for 5 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 141A: Camera as Witness: International Human Rights Documentaries

Rarely screened documentary films, focusing on global problems, human rights issues, and aesthetic challenges in making documentaries on international topics. Meetings with filmmakers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED
Instructors: Bojic, J. (PI)

ITALIAN 101: Italy: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Renowned for its rich cultural tradition, Italy is also one of the most problematic nations in Europe. This course explores the contradictions at the heart of Italy by examining how art and literature provide a unique perspective onto modern Italian history. We will focus on key phenomena that contribute both positively and negatively to the complex "spirit" of Italy, such as the presence of the past, political realism and idealism, revolution, corruption, decadence, war, immigration, and crises of all kinds. Through the study of historical and literary texts, films, and news media, the course seeks to understand Italy's current place in Europe and its future trajectory by looking to its past as a point of comparison. Taught in English.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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