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AFRICAAM 113V: Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s (AFRICAST 113V, CSRE 113V, HISTORY 205D)

This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world(s), from the late 1400s to the 1800s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries. We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities (creolization), religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Lamotte, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 117J: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary American Film (AMSTUD 117, ASNAMST 117D, CSRE 117D, FEMGEN 117F)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and analytical frameworks necessary to critically understand constructions of race, gender, and sexuality in contemporary American film. Through a sustained engagement with a range of independent and Hollywood films produced since 2000, students analyze the ways that cinematic representations have both reflected and constructed dominant notions of race, gender, and sexuality in the United States. Utilizing an intersectional framework that sees race, gender, and sexuality as always defined by one another, the course examines the ways that dominant notions of difference have been maintained and contested through film in the United States. Films to be discussed include Coco, Get Out, Moonlight, Mosquita y Mari, and The Grace Lee Project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

AFRICAAM 118X: Family Stories: Uncovering Histories of Identity and Difference (AMSTUD 118, ASNAMST 118S, CSRE 118S)

This course examines family history as a site for understanding identity, power, and social difference in American society. Focusing in particular on the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality, we approach the family as an archive through which we might write alternative histories to the ones that dominate the national historical consciousness. To do this, we examine memoirs, oral histories, and first-person documentaries as historical texts that can be used to foreground marginalized historical voices. Students will then be asked to apply course readings and theories to their own family histories as a means of better understanding issues of identity and difference.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

AFRICAAM 120F: Buying Black: Economic Sovereignty, Race, and Entrepreneurship in the USA (ANTHRO 120F, CSRE 120F)

This seminar examines how communities of color have critiqued and transformed capitalism in America through concepts of economic independence, entrepreneurship, and sovereignty. By tracing concepts such as the double-duty dollar, casino/tribal capitalisms, retail boycotts, and buying black, the course traces ethnic entrepreneurialism in America. Students will also consider the international context of such US-based movements, particularly in relation to American imperialism and global supply-chain capitalism.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 121N: How to Make a Racist (CSRE 21N, PSYCH 21N)

How does a child, born without beliefs or expectations about race, grow up to be racist? To address this complicated question, this seminar will introduce you to some of the psychological theories on the development of racial stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Together, these theories highlight how cognitive, social, and motivational factors contribute to racist thinking. We will engage thoughtfully and critically with each topic through reflection and discussion. Occasionally, I will supplement the discussion and class activities with a brief lecture, in order to highlight the central issues, concepts, and relevant findings. We will share our own experiences, perspectives, and insights, and together, we will explore how racist thinking takes root. Come to class with an open mind, a willingness to be vulnerable, and a desire to learn from and with your peers. Students with diverse opinions and perspectives are encouraged to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Roberts, S. (PI)

AFRICAAM 127A: Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts (CSRE 127A)

This course explores the history and development of the hip-hop arts movement, from its precursor movements in music, dance, visual arts, literature, and folk and street cultures to its rise as a neighborhood subculture in the Bronx in the early 1970s through its local, regional and global expansion and development. Hip-hop aesthetics, structures, and politics will be explored within the context of the movement's rise as a post-multicultural form in an era of neoliberal globalization. (This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to satisfy a Ways requirement.)
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 132: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health (CSRE 122S, HUMBIO 122S)

Examines health disparities in the U.S., looking at the patterns of those disparities and their root causes. Explores the intersection of lower social class and ethnic minority status in affecting health status and access to health care. Compares social and biological conceptualizations of race and ethnicity. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 133: Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean (AFRICAST 132, COMPLIT 133A, COMPLIT 233A, CSRE 133E, FRENCH 133, JEWISHST 143)

This course aims to equip students with an understanding of the cultural, social, and political aspects at play in the literatures of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean of the 20th and 21st century. Our primary readings will be Francophone novels and poetry. We will also read some theoretical texts. The assigned readings will expose students to literature from diverse French-speaking regions of the African/Caribbean world. This course will also serve as a "literary toolbox," with the intention of facilitating an understanding of literary genres, and terms. Students can expect to work on their production of written and spoken French, in addition to reading comprehension. Special guest: Moroccan author Meryem Alaoui. Required readings include: Aime Cesaire, Maryse Condé, Fatou Diome, Dany Laferriere, Leonara Miano, Albert Memmi. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Seck, F. (PI)

AFRICAAM 146A: African Politics (POLISCI 146A)

Africa has lagged the rest of the developing world in terms of economic development, the establishment of social order, and the consolidation of democracy. This course seeks to identify the historical and political sources accounting for this lag, and to provide extensive case study and statistical material to understand what sustains it, and how it might be overcome.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 147: History of South Africa (CSRE 174, HISTORY 147)

(Same as HISTORY 47. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Campbell, J. (PI)
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