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721 - 730 of 1092 results for: all courses

ITALIAN 115: Virtual Italy (ARCHLGY 117, CLASSICS 115, ENGLISH 115, HISTORY 238C)

Classical Italy attracted thousands of travelers throughout the 1700s. Referring to their journey as the "Grand Tour," travelers pursued intellectual passions, promoted careers, and satisfied wanderlust, all while collecting antiquities to fill museums and estates back home. What can computational approaches tell us about who traveled, where and why? We will read travel accounts; experiment with parsing; and visualize historical data. Final projects to form credited contributions to the Grand Tour Project, a cutting-edge digital platform. No prior programming experience necessary.
Last offered: Summer 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ITALIAN 127: Inventing Italian Literature: Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarca

This course examines the origins of Italian literature in the late Middle Ages, with a particular focus on love. Course topics include human and divine love, beauty, and the role of the eyes in gazing and contemplation. We will read selections from Dante's "Vita Nuova" and "Divina Commedia;" Petrarca's "Canzoniere;" and Boccaccio's "Decameron."Taught in Italian. Recommended: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent level of proficiency.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 128: The Italian Renaissance and the Path to Modernity

Are humans free and self-determining agents possessed of infinite potential or limited beings subject to the vagaries of fortune? What is the relationship between love and beauty? Is it better for a leader to inspire love or fear? These are the kind of questions Renaissance thinkers asked and we will pursue in our study of the literature, art, and history of Italy from the fifteenth through the eighteenth centuries. In this course, you will become acquainted with major writers, thinkers, and artists, and key ideas, innovations, and movements. Examining masterpieces of literature (poetry and prose), art (painting, drawing and sculpture), theater and music, including works of the High Renaissance, we will explore such topics as love, power, faith, reason, and contingency in human affairs. With the themes of discovery, invention and adaption as our guide, we will reflect on perennial tensions between imitation and inspiration, tradition and innovation, and conformity and transgression in Renaissance and early modern Italy. Taught in Italian. Recommended: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent (2 years of Italian). This course fulfills the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement.
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 129: Truth or Consequences: Introduction to Modern Italian Literature and Culture

This course serves as an introduction to modern Italian literature and culture, while at the same time allowing students to further improve their understanding of Italian language. The guiding theme of our journey will be the Fantastic, a niche and often overlooked genre in the canon. Is the Fantastic a mere escape from reality and grim historical contingencies? Does it, perhaps, tell us more truth that it seems to concede? Through this notion, we will seek to analyze the different social, political, and cultural dynamics that have shaped Italy's history since its unification. Starting from Carlo Collodi's Pinocchio, we will see how different authors have used fantastic tales as a way to transgress literary and linguistic boundaries. From the Futurism of Aldo Palazzeschi and Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, moving through Massimo Bontempelli and Alberto Savinio's Surrealism, to the weird tales of Tommaso Landolfi and Dino Buzzati and the metaphysical works of Anna Maria Ortese and Italo Calvino, students will become more familiar with the literary canon and specific aspects of Italian history and culture. All class discussion, reading, and writing will be in Italian.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Dule, G. (PI)

ITALIAN 140: Great Minds of the Italian Renaissance and their World (ITALIAN 240)

What enabled Leonardo da Vinci to excel in over a dozen fields from painting to engineering and to anticipate flight four hundred years before the first aircraft took off? How did Michelangelo paint the Sistine Chapel Ceiling? What forces and insights led Machiavelli to write "The Prince"? An historical moment and a cultural era, the Italian Renaissance famously saw monumental achievements in literature, art, and architecture, influential developments in science and technology, and the flourishing of multi-talented individuals who contributed profoundly, expertly, and simultaneously to very different fields. In this course on the great thinkers, writers, and achievers of the Italian Renaissance, we will study these "universal geniuses" and their world. Investigating the writings, thought, and lives of such figures as Leonardo da Vinci, Niccolò Machiavelli, and Galileo Galilei, we will interrogate historical and contemporary ideas concerning genius, creativity, and the phenomenon of "Renaissance man" known as polymathy. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Prodan, S. (PI)

ITALIAN 148: Cinema and the Real: Italian Neo-Realism and the French New Wave (FRENCH 148, FRENCH 248, ITALIAN 248)

Between the 1940s and 1960s, in Italy and France, a handful of movie directors revolutionized the art of cinema. In the wake of World War II they entirely re-defined the aesthetics of the 7th art in films such as "Bicycle Thieves," "400 Blows," "Rome Open City," and "Breathless." These works shared an aesthetic and a philosophy of "the real" - they eschewed big studios and sets in favor of natural light, on-location shooting, and non-professional actors to capture the present moment. This survey course will explore how the dialogue between Italian neo-realism and the French New Wave has yielded some of the most revolutionary filmic masterpieces of both traditions, while raising theoretical and philosophical questions about form, time, space, fiction, representation, and reality. Films: Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio de Sica, Luchino Visconti, Federico Fellini, François Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Alain Resnais and Agnès Varda.
Last offered: Autumn 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 149: Love at First Sight: Visual Desire, Attraction, and the Pleasures of Art (ARTHIST 119, ARTHIST 319, FRENCH 149, FRENCH 349, ITALIAN 349)

Why do dating sites rely on photographs? Why do we believe that love is above all a visual force? How is pleasure, even erotic pleasure, achieved through looking? While the psychology of impressions offers some answers, this course uncovers the ways poets, songwriters, and especially artists have explored myths and promoted ideas about the coupling of love and seeing. Week by week, we will be reflecting on love as political critique, social disruption, and magical force. And we will do so by examining some of the most iconic works of art, from Dante's writings on lovesickness to Caravaggio's Narcissus, studying the ways that objects have shifted from keepsakes to targets of our cares. While exploring the visual roots and evolutions of what has become one of life's fundamental drives, this course offers a passionate survey of European art from Giotto's kiss to Fragonard's swing that elicits stimulating questions about the sensorial nature of desire and the human struggle to control emotions.
Last offered: Summer 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 152: Boccaccio's Decameron: The Ethics of Storytelling (ITALIAN 352)

This course involves an in-depth study of Boccaccio's Decameron in the context of medieval theories of poetry and interpretation. The goal is to understand more fully the relationship between literature and lived experience implied by Boccaccio's fictions. We will address key critical issues and theoretical approaches related to the text. Taught in English translation, there will be an optional supplementary Italian discussion section during weeks 2-9.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 154: Film & Philosophy (COMPLIT 154A, ENGLISH 154F, FRENCH 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 155: The Mafia in Society, Film, and Fiction (COMPLIT 155A)

The mafia has become a global problem through its infiltration of international business, and its model of organized crime has spread all over the world from its origins in Sicily. At the same time, film and fiction remain fascinated by a romantic, heroic vision of the mafia. Compares both Italian and American fantasies of the Mafia to its history and impact on Italian and global culture. Taught in English.
Last offered: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
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