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FEMGEN 180: Gender Relations in Islam (RELIGST 180)

This course investigates the ways in which gender identities and relationships between men and women have been articulated, constructed, and refashioned throughout the Muslim world. Starting with problematizing the fixed notions of gender and sexuality, we map the attitudes toward these notions through visiting a diverse array of sources from the Qur¿an, Sunna, and legal documents to historical and anthropological case studies, literature, and film from South East Asia to Europe and North America. We examine the notions of femininity and masculinity in the Qur¿an, family laws, and attitudes toward homosexuality and transgendered populations. We read examples of ambiguous use of language with regards to gender and sexuality in Persian poetry and mystical traditions. We study the dynamic relationship between Islam and Feminism in the Muslim world. Finally, we witness the implications of these attitudes in our case studies and stories, from a divorce court in Iran to a wedding in Sudan.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 183: Re-Imagining American Borders (AMSTUD 183, CSRE 183)

Borders of all kinds in this America have been tight for a long time, and the four years of the Trump regime have shown new violent dangers in such divisions in race, ethnicity, gender and class in this country. In the inordinately difficult years of 2020-2021 as the pandemic has uncovered even more lethal created divisions via closed crossings and early deaths reflecting difference, our task in this course is to both examine how systemic inequities have been developed as part of American history and our daily life, especially as we see the pandemic effects, and to see how American artists, including novelists, poets, visual and performance artists, filmmakers, photographers and essayists, have developed approaches to examine, resist or re-create how the shards of our fractured identities may make sense to us. Films from Raoul Peck on colonialism and white supremacy in this America, Barry Jenkins and Kara Walker on slavery in visual narratives, poets Shailja Patel, Naomi Shihab Nye, Cl more »
Borders of all kinds in this America have been tight for a long time, and the four years of the Trump regime have shown new violent dangers in such divisions in race, ethnicity, gender and class in this country. In the inordinately difficult years of 2020-2021 as the pandemic has uncovered even more lethal created divisions via closed crossings and early deaths reflecting difference, our task in this course is to both examine how systemic inequities have been developed as part of American history and our daily life, especially as we see the pandemic effects, and to see how American artists, including novelists, poets, visual and performance artists, filmmakers, photographers and essayists, have developed approaches to examine, resist or re-create how the shards of our fractured identities may make sense to us. Films from Raoul Peck on colonialism and white supremacy in this America, Barry Jenkins and Kara Walker on slavery in visual narratives, poets Shailja Patel, Naomi Shihab Nye, Claudia Rankine, Layli Long Soldier, Janice Lobo Sapiago, Felicia Zamora, Zhenyu Yuan, from within the power of multiple languages, and Ta-Nehisi Coates and Nikole Hannah-Jones of the '1619' Project who bring US education into the story, all speak to recent art and social action. Nearby guest speakers from the newly produced Mini Museum Honoring the Black Panther Party in West Oakland, and creators of the Stanford Graphic Novel Project's visual art book with revelations on California prison conditions will also provide more vivid examples for all. Students' work for the quarter includes both written analysis and creative final projects.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Duffey, C. (PI)

FEMGEN 187X: Sex, Gender, and Violence: French Women Writers Today (FEMGEN 287X, FEMGEN 387X, FRENCH 187, FRENCH 287, FRENCH 387)

Long before the 2017 #Metoo campaign, French women writers have explored through powerful fictions and autobiographies the different shades of economic, social, psychological, physical, or sexual violence that is exerted against, but also by and between, women. How does literature - the power of words - address, deconstruct or comfort power dynamics (during sex and between the sexes) that are usually silenced, taboo or unspeakable? Themes explored: sex and gender, sex and power, rape culture, sexual and moral taboos (incest, abortion, pornography, infanticide, lesbianism), the body as social stigma or source of meaning. Special attention given to narrative and descriptive strategies designed to avert, expose, deconstruct or account for specifically feminine experiences (rape, orgasm, pregnancy). Authors include Marie Darrieusecq, Christine Angot, Annie Ernaux, Marie NDiaye, Virginie Despentes, Leila Slimani, Ivan Jablonka along with feminist theory. Taught in French.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 188Q: Imagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person (CSRE 188Q)

Gender roles, gender relations and sexual identity explored in contemporary literature and conversation with guest authors. Weekly meetings designated for book discussion and meeting with authors. Interest in writing and a curiosity about diverse women's lives would be helpful to students. Students will use such tools as close reading, research, analysis and imagination. Seminar requires strong voice of all participants. Oral presentations, discussion papers, final projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: Writing 2, WAY-ED, GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Miner, V. (PI)

FEMGEN 190W: Contemporary Women Writers (ENGLISH 190W)

"Every word a woman writes changes the story of the world, revises the official version¿¿is this what sets contemporary women writers apart? How can we understand the relation between the radically unprecedented material such writers explore and ¿the official version¿? What do we find compelling in their challenging of structure, style, chronology, character? Our reading- and writing-intensive seminar will dig into the ways women writers confront, appropriate, subvert, or re-imagine convention, investigating, for example, current debate about the value of ¿dislikable¿ or ¿angry¿ women characters and their impact on readers. While pursuing such issues, you'll write a variety of both essayistic and fictional responses, each of which is designed to complicate and enlarge your creative and critical responsiveness and to spark ideas for your final project. By affirming risk-taking and originality throughout our quarter, seminar conversation will support gains in your close-reading practice and in articulating your views, including respectful dissent, in lively discourse¿in short, skills highly useful in a writer¿s existence. Our texts will come from various genres, including short stories, novels, essays, blog posts, reviews, memoir.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

FEMGEN 192: Women in Contemporary French Cinema (FILMEDIA 112, FRENCH 192, FRENCH 392)

Women as objects and subjects of the voyeuristic gaze inherent to cinema. The evolution of female characters, roles, actresses, directors in the French film industry from the sexual liberation to #metoo. Women as archetypes, icones, images, or as agents and subjects. Emphasis on filmic analysis: framing, point of view, narrative, camera work as ways to convey meaning. Themes include: sexualization and desire; diversity and intersectionality in films; new theories of the female gaze; gender, ethnicity and class. Filmmakers include Roger Vadim, Agnès Varda, Luis Buñuel, Claude Chabrol, Colline Serreau, Elena Rossi, Tonie Marshall, Houda Benyamina, Eléonore Pourriat, Céline Sciamma. VISIT BY FILM DIRECTORS Elena Rossi and Sciamma (pending).nnFilms in French with subtitles; Discussion in English; 3 units, 4 units or 5 units.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

FEMGEN 205: Songs of Love and War: Gender, Crusade, Politics (FRENCH 205)

Analysis of medieval love, satirical and Crusade lyrics of the trouabdours. Study of deictic address, corporeal subjectivity, the female voice, love debates, and the body as a figure of political conflict. Course readings include medieval treatises on lyric and modern translations of the troubadour tradition. Works by Ovid, Bernart de Ventadorn, Bertran de Born, La Comtessa de Dia, Thibaut de Champagne, Raimon Vidal, Dante, and Pound. Taught in English. Course includes a lab component for creation of multi-media translation projects: trobar. stanford.edu.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 215A: The Queer 20th Century: German LGBTQ Literature and Film (FEMGEN 115A, GERMAN 115, GERMAN 215)

What was it like to be queer in 20th-century Germany? This course examines the rich and sometimes surprising LGBTQ culture of 20th-century Germany, featuring stories that are often left out of traditional seminars. Through literature and film, we will learn about pioneering gay rights activists, persecution under National Socialism, emancipation movements under capitalism and socialism, and debates that are shaping queer life in contemporary Germany. Taught in English; students of all backgrounds are very welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 236: Literature and Transgression (COMPLIT 236)

Close reading and analysis of erotic-sexual and aesthetic-stylistic transgression in selected works by such authors as Baudelaire, Wilde, Flaubert, Rachilde, Schnitzler, Kafka, Joyce, Barnes, Eliot, Bataille, Burroughs, Thomas Mann, Kathy Acker, as well as in recent digital literature and online communities. Along with understanding the changing cultural, social, and political contexts of what constitutes "transgression" or censorship, students will gain knowledge of influential theories of transgression and conceptual limits by Foucault, Blanchot, and contemporary queer and feminist writers.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 258X: Black Feminist Theater and Theory (AFRICAAM 258, CSRE 258, TAPS 258)

From the rave reviews garnered by Angelina Weld Grimke's lynching play, Rachel to recent work by Lynn Nottage on Rwanda, black women playwrights have addressed key issues in modern culture and politics. We will analyze and perform work written by black women in the U.S., Britain and the Caribbean in the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics include: sexuality, surrealism, colonialism, freedom, violence, colorism, love, history, community and more. Playwrights include: Angelina Grimke, Lorriane Hansberry, Winsome Pinnock, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan- Lori Parks, Ntzoke Shange, Pearl Cleage, Sarah Jones, Anna DeVeare Smith, Alice Childress, Lydia Diamond and Zora Neale Hurston.)
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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