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191 - 200 of 974 results for: all courses

CHINA 115: Sex, Gender, and Power in Modern China (CHINA 215, FEMGEN 150, FEMGEN 250)

Investigates how sex, gender, and power are entwined in the Chinese experience of modernity. Topics include anti-footbinding campaigns, free love/free sex, women's mobilization in revolution and war, the new Marriage Law of 1950, Mao's iron girls, postsocialist celebrations of sensuality, and emergent queer politics. Readings range from feminist theory to China-focused historiography, ethnography, memoir, biography, fiction, essay, and film. All course materials are in English.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 151B: The Nature of Knowledge: Science and Literature in East Asia (CHINA 251B, JAPAN 151B, JAPAN 251B, KOREA 151, KOREA 251)

"The Nature of Knowledge" explores the intersections of science and humanities East Asia. It covers a broad geographic area (China, Japan, and Korea) along a long temporal space (14th century - present) to investigate how historical notions about the natural world, the human body, and social order defied, informed, and constructed our current categories of science and humanities. The course will make use of medical, geographic, and cosmological treatises from premodern East Asia, portrayals and uses of science in modern literature, film, and media, as well as theoretical and historical essays on the relationships between literature, science, and society.nnAs part of its exploration of science and the humanities in conjunction, the course addresses how understandings of nature are mediated through techniques of narrative, rhetoric, visualization, and demonstration. In the meantime, it also examines how the emergence of modern disciplinary "science" influenced the development of literary language, tropes, and techniques of subject development. This class will expose the ways that science has been mobilized for various ideological projects and to serve different interests, and will produce insights into contemporary debates about the sciences and humanities.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 153: Chinese Bodies, Chinese Selves (CHINA 253)

Interdisciplinary. The body as a contested site of representational practices, identity politics, cultural values, and social norms. Body images, inscriptions, and practices in relation to health, morality, gender, sexuality, nationalism, consumerism, and global capitalism in China and Taiwan. Sources include anthropological, literary, and historical studies, and fiction and film. No knowledge of Chinese required.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 154Q: Utopia/Dystopia in Chinese Literature and Culture

What has China been dreaming of? Since 2013, Chinese president Xi Jinping has been trying to popularize the idea of Chinese Dream as an expression of national and individual vision. But dreams of places better or worse have been abound in the land we know as China since at least Tao Yuanming described the mysterious Peach Blossom Spring in the 5th century. How many dreams have been dreamt since then? How have the visions and ideals expressed in these dreams changed in relation to the succession of imperial dynasties, the trauma of Western imperialism, the modernizing experiments, and today¿s rise of China as a major world power?nnThe science fiction writer and translator Ken Liu writes that ¿texts concerning dreams always say something about the dreamer, the dream interpreter, and the audience.¿ In this course, we will understand China and Chinese culture by investigating Chinese texts that dream, particularly those that dream about utopias and dystopias.We will consider indigenous uto more »
What has China been dreaming of? Since 2013, Chinese president Xi Jinping has been trying to popularize the idea of Chinese Dream as an expression of national and individual vision. But dreams of places better or worse have been abound in the land we know as China since at least Tao Yuanming described the mysterious Peach Blossom Spring in the 5th century. How many dreams have been dreamt since then? How have the visions and ideals expressed in these dreams changed in relation to the succession of imperial dynasties, the trauma of Western imperialism, the modernizing experiments, and today¿s rise of China as a major world power?nnThe science fiction writer and translator Ken Liu writes that ¿texts concerning dreams always say something about the dreamer, the dream interpreter, and the audience.¿ In this course, we will understand China and Chinese culture by investigating Chinese texts that dream, particularly those that dream about utopias and dystopias.We will consider indigenous utopian traditions, early modern speculative fiction written under the influence of modern ideologies ranging from nationalism, Social Darwinism to Marxism, as well as contemporary science fiction by writers such as the Hugo Award-winning Liu Cixin and Hao Jingfang. As we analyze the desires, hopes, and fears that manifest themselves in these Chinese alternative realities, we will also think about questions that concern all of us as human beings: who are we and how do we want to live with one another?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Zhou, C. (PI)

CHINA 160: Classical Poetry: Reading, Theory, Interpretation (CHINA 260)

Introduction to the reading and interpretation of classical Chinese poetry, with attention to the language of poetry, aesthetics, expressive purposes, and social roles. Readings in Chinese. Prerequisite: three years of modern Chinese or equivalent.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2016 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CHINA 163: Chinese Biographies of Women (CHINA 263)

Generic and historical analysis of the two-millennia long biographical tradition inaugurated by Liu Xiang, ca. 79-8 B.C.E. Chinese women's history, intellectual history, historiography, and literary studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Zhou, Y. (PI)

CHINGEN 95: Beauty and Decadence in China (CHINGEN 195)

An inquiry into the conception of aesthetic beauty in China. Special attention to the coupling of aesthetics ("beauty") and morality ("goodness") in the visualnand literary arts, as well as the frequent dissonance or rivalry between them.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 9N: What Didn't Make it into the Bible (JEWISHST 9N, RELIGST 9N)

Over two billion people alive today consider the Bible to be sacred scripture. But how did the books that made it into the bible get there in the first place? Who decided what was to be part of the bible and what wasn't? How would history look differently if a given book didn't make the final cut and another one did? Hundreds of ancient Jewish and Christian texts are not included in the Bible. ¿What Didn't Make It in the Bible¿ focuses on these excluded writings. We will explore the Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse ancient romance novels, explore the adventures of fallen angels who sired giants (and taught humans about cosmetics), tour heaven and hell, encounter the garden of Eden story told from the perspective of the snake, and learn how the world will end. The seminar assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the bible, or ancient history. It is designed more »
Over two billion people alive today consider the Bible to be sacred scripture. But how did the books that made it into the bible get there in the first place? Who decided what was to be part of the bible and what wasn't? How would history look differently if a given book didn't make the final cut and another one did? Hundreds of ancient Jewish and Christian texts are not included in the Bible. ¿What Didn't Make It in the Bible¿ focuses on these excluded writings. We will explore the Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse ancient romance novels, explore the adventures of fallen angels who sired giants (and taught humans about cosmetics), tour heaven and hell, encounter the garden of Eden story told from the perspective of the snake, and learn how the world will end. The seminar assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the bible, or ancient history. It is designed for students who are part of faith traditions that consider the bible to be sacred, as well as those who are not. The only prerequisite is an interest in exploring books, groups, and ideas that eventually lost the battles of history and to keep asking the question "why." In critically examining these ancient narratives and the communities that wrote them, you will learn about the content and history of the Bible, better appreciate the diversity of early Judaism and Christianity, understand the historical context of these religions, and explore the politics behind what did and did not make it into the bible.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Penn, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 14N: Ecology in Philosophy and Literature

What can we do to help the environment? How do our conceptions of the environment affect our actions? In this class, we examine the basic principles of ecological thinking in Western culture. We explore the ways that different writers represent and conceive of the natural world. We also analyze different environmental philosophies. We will address the following questions: What is nature? Who decides what is "natural"? How do humans differ from other animals? Do these differences make us superior beings? How do our eating habits affect the earth? What are the philosophical arguments for vegetarianism and veganism? How have the technologies of television, cell phones, and computers affected our relationship to the natural world? To what extent do we dwell in cyberspace? How does this affect our habitation on earth? How does modern technology inform the way that we think and act in the world? To help us answer these questions, we read nature writers (Edward Abbey, Annie Dillard), philosophers (Descartes, Heidegger), short stories (Kafka, Ursula le Guin), novelists (Conrad, Tournier) and contemporary writers (Peter Singer, Michael Pollan, Elizabeth Kolbert).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CLASSICS 18N: The Artist in Ancient Greek Society (ARTHIST 100N)

Given the importance of art to all aspects of their lives, the Greeks had reason to respect their artists. Yet potters, painters and even sculptors possessed little social standing. n nWhy did the Greeks value the work of craftsmen but not the men themselves? Why did Herodotus dismiss those who worked with their hands as "mechanics?" What prompted Homer to claim that "there is no greater glory for a man¿ than what he achieves with his own hands," provided that he was throwing a discus and not a vase on a wheel?n nPainted pottery was essential to the religious and secular lives of the Greeks. Libations to the gods and to the dead required vases from which to pour them. Economic prosperity depended on the export of wine and oil in durable clay containers. At home, depictions of gods and heroes on vases reinforced Greek values and helped parents to educate their children. Ceramic sets with scenes of Dionysian excess were reserved for elite symposia from which those who potted and painted more »
Given the importance of art to all aspects of their lives, the Greeks had reason to respect their artists. Yet potters, painters and even sculptors possessed little social standing. n nWhy did the Greeks value the work of craftsmen but not the men themselves? Why did Herodotus dismiss those who worked with their hands as "mechanics?" What prompted Homer to claim that "there is no greater glory for a man¿ than what he achieves with his own hands," provided that he was throwing a discus and not a vase on a wheel?n nPainted pottery was essential to the religious and secular lives of the Greeks. Libations to the gods and to the dead required vases from which to pour them. Economic prosperity depended on the export of wine and oil in durable clay containers. At home, depictions of gods and heroes on vases reinforced Greek values and helped parents to educate their children. Ceramic sets with scenes of Dionysian excess were reserved for elite symposia from which those who potted and painted them were excluded.n nSculptors were less lowly but even those who carved the Parthenon were still regarded as "mechanics," with soft bodies and soft minds (Xenophon) "indifferent to higher things" (Plutarch).n nThe seminar addresses these issues. Students will read and discuss texts, write response papers and present slide lectures and gallery talks on aspects of the artist's profession.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)
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