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141 - 150 of 970 results for: all courses

ARTHIST 189C: Global Currents: Early Modern Art Enterprises, Economies, and Imaginaries (ARTHIST 389C)

Episodes of global artistic exchange from the 16th to 19th centuries involving commodities (porcelains and textiles), technologies (printmaking, perspective, and cartography), and imaginaries (Chinoiserie, East Asian Occidenteries, Orientalism, Japonisme). The role of enterprises, institutions, and power relations in artistic economies, from the Portuguese Empire, Jesuit mission networks and East India Companies to imperialist systems.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 192B: Art of the African Diaspora

This introduction to the art of the African Diaspora uses art and visual culture as means to explore the history and impact of the global spread of African peoples from slavery until the present day. Lectures and discussions will examine a range of artistic practices from street festivals and Afro-Caribbean religious traditions to the work of studio-trained artists of international repute.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 203: Artists, Athletes, Courtesans and Crooks (CLASSICS 163)

The seminar covers a range of topics devoted to the makers of Greek art and artifacts, the ancient Greeks who used them in life and the afterlife, and the miscreants - from Lord Elgin to contemporary tomb-looters and dealers- whose deeds have damaged, deracinated and desecrated temples, sculptures and grave goods. Readings include ancient texts in translation, books and articles by eloquent experts, legal texts and lively page-turners. Classes meet in the seminar room and the Cantor Center.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 207C: Phenomenology and Aesthetics in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 407C)

This course explores the phenomenal aspects of the medieval image and space such as glitter, shadow, smoke, reverberation and how these presence effects were conceptualized in medieval culture as animation. Focus is on a select group of monuments as well as engagement with medieval objects at the Cantor Art Museum and the facsimiles of medieval manuscripts kept at the Art Library and Special Collections. Among the monuments we will study are the Alhambra in Spain, the Apocalypse MSS, the Cantigas of Alfonso X, the Byzantine Joshua Roll, the Homiles of the Monk Kokkinobaphos, the Ashburnhamensis Pentateuch, and the Rossano Gospels.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2015 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 211: The California Missions: Art History and Reconciliation (CSRE 111, NATIVEAM 211)

Sites of the spirit and devotion, sites of genocide, foreboding actors in Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo, the subject of fourth-grade school projects, the Spanish Missions of Alta California are complex sites of inquiry, their meanings and associations different for each visitor. This seminar examines the art and architecture of the California Missions built between 1769 and 1823. Constructed with local materials and decorated with reredos, paintings and sculptures from Mexico and Spain, the Missions are at once humble spaces and flagships of a belated global baroque. They were also the laboratories of indigenous artists and artisans. This course seeks to understand how Mission art was meant to function, how and why it was made, what its materials were, while asking what the larger role of art was in a global system of missions. Can the study of this art lead to the reconciliation of populations in North America and within the field of art history? The Missions require a specific reexamination of the relationship between European and colonial forms, not as objects of curiosity or diffusion but as viable and globally informed agents.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 213: Renaissance Print Culture: Art in the Cantor Arts Center

The seminar takes place in the Cantor Arts Center and provides a unique opportunity to study original works of art from the museum's storage. Beginning in the fifteenth century new techniques of reproduction changed the pictorial culture of Europe. Some engravings called attention to the engraver's virtuosity, and the private nature of the medium was explored for erotic imagery. By the sixteenth century printed images were used for political and religious propaganda during the societal upheavals.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 224N: The Popular Culture of Abstract Art

Is abstract art inherently elitist? Or gendered? How does it differ from (mere) decoration? Is there a chasm that necessarily separates abstract and popular art? Can you think of examples in which those categories might overlap?  This course is designed to deconstruct the boundaries that tend to make abstract art seem remote and difficult to understand, while pop(ular) art typically seems fun and accessible.  How can we complicate these clichés to construct a more compelling narrative of modern art?n nSeminar participants will have many opportunities to see and study original works at Stanford's Cantor Arts Center and the Anderson Collection, as well as a trip to SFMOMA. Artists studied include Georges Braque, Constantin Brancusi, Marcel Duchamp, Piet Mondrian, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Jackson Pollock.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 231: Leonardo's World: Science, Technology, and Art (ARTHIST 431, HISTORY 231, HISTORY 331, ITALIAN 231, ITALIAN 331)

Leonardo da Vinci is emblematic of creativity and innovation. His art is iconic, his inventions legendary. His understanding of nature, the human body, and machines made him a scientist and engineer as well as an artist. This class explores the historical Leonardo, exploring his interests and accomplishments as a product of the society of Renaissance Italy. Why did this world produce a Leonardo? Students will contribute to a library exhibit for the 500th anniversary of Leonardo's death in May 2019.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 238C: Art and the Market (FRENCH 238)

This course examines the relationship between art and the market, from the château-builders of the French Renaissance to avant-garde painters in the nineteenth-century Salon des Refusés. Using examples drawn from France, this course explores the relationship between artists and patrons, the changing status of artists in society, patterns of shifting taste, and the effects of museums on making and collecting art. Students will read a mixture of historical texts about art and artists, fictional works depicting the process of artistic creation, and theoretical analyses of the politics embedded in artworks. They will engage in sustained analysis of individual artworks, as well as the market structures in which such artworks were produced and bought. The course will be taught in English, with the option of readings in French for departmental majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pesic, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 245: Art, Business & the Law (SIW 245)

This course examines the intersection of art, business, and the law from a number of different angles, focusing on issues that impact our understanding of works of art and their circulation in the modern and contemporary periods. Topics range from individual case studies (e.g., Leonardo da Vinci; Richard Serra) to the consolidation of the art market, and include cultural heritage issues, problems of censorship, and conceptions of authorship and intellectual property.nnIn Autumn 2017-18 this course will be offered at Stanford in Washington in Washington, D.C. and enrollment is limited to students who are enrolled in the SIW Program.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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