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281 - 290 of 487 results for: all courses

HISTORY 148: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, CLASSICS 82, HISTORY 48)

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 151: The American West (AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, ENGLISH 124, POLISCI 124A)

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 168: American History in Film Since World War ll

U.S. society, culture, and politics since WW II through feature films. Topics include: McCarthyism and the Cold War; ethnicity and racial identify; changing sex and gender relationships; the civil rights and anti-war movements; and mass media. Films include: The Best Years of Our Lives, Salt of the Earth, On the Waterfront, Raisin in the Sun, Kramer v Kramer, and Falling Down.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Carroll, P. (PI)

HISTORY 195: Modern Korean History (HISTORY 395)

(Same as HISTORY 95. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195.) This lecture course provides a general introduction to the history of modern Korea. Themes include the characteristics of the Chosôn dynasty, reforms and rebellions in the nineteenth century, Korean nationalism; Japan's colonial rule and Korean identities; decolonization and the Korean War; and the different state-building processes in North and South, South Korea's democratization in 1980s, and the current North Korean crisis.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 197: Southeast Asia: From Antiquity to the Modern Era (HISTORY 97)

The history of S.E. Asia, comprising Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, Burma, Cambodia, and Laos, from antiquity to the present. The spread of Indian cultural influences, the rise of indigenous states, and the emergence of globally linked trade networks. European colonization, economic transformation, the rise of nationalism, the development of the modern state, and the impact of globalization.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 208B: Women's Activist Response to War (FEMGEN 208B, HISTORY 308B, HUMRTS 113)

Theoretical issues, historical origins, changing forms of women's activism in response to war throughout the 20th century, and contemporary cases, such as the Russian Committee of Soldiers Mothers, Bosnian Mothers of Srebrenica, Serbian Women in Black, and the American Cindy Sheehan. Focus is on the U.S. and Eastern Europe, with attention to Israel, England, and Argentina.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 232A: Power, Art, and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy (HISTORY 332A)

( History 232A is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 332A is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) Provides a fundamental understanding of the cultural and political imagination of the Italian Renaissance, with particular emphasis on Florence between 1300 and 1600 CE. Topics include political and social upheavals, radical shifts in religious practice and devotion, the commercial revolution in trade and banking, the rediscovery of classical philosophy and style, and the flowering of the literary and visual arts.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 254: Popular Culture and American Nature

Despite John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson, it is arguable that the Disney studios have more to do with molding popular attitudes toward the natural world than politicians, ecologists, and activists. Disney as the central figure in the 20th-century American creation of nature. How Disney, the products of his studio, and other primary and secondary texts see environmentalism, science, popular culture, and their interrelationships.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: White, R. (PI)

HISTORY 256G: Constructing Race and Religion in America (AFRICAAM 236, AMSTUD 246, CSRE 246, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 246, RELIGST 346)

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 288: Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict (HISTORY 388, JEWISHST 288, JEWISHST 388)

This course examines some salient issues of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the late 19th century to the present. At the end of the course you should be able to articulate the positions of the major parties to the conflict, with the understanding that there is no single, unified Zionist (or Jewish) or Palestinian (or Arab) position. One quarter does not allow sufficient time to cover even all of the important topics comprehensively (for example, the role of the Arab states, the USA and the USSR, and the internal history of Israel receive less attention than is desirable). Some prior knowledge of Middle East history is desirable, but not required. Vigorous debate and criticism are strongly encouraged. Criticism and response expressed in a civil tone is an important way to get a fuller and more truthful picture of something. This is not only a fundamental democratic right and a basic citizenship skill, but it is essential to interpreting information and making good policy. Rights not used are easily lost.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI
Instructors: Beinin, J. (PI)
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