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921 - 930 of 966 results for: all courses

TAPS 41N: Inventing Modern Theatre: Georg B├╝chner and Frank Wedekind

The German writers Georg Büchner (1813-1837) and Frank Wedekind (1864-1918). Many of the most important theater and film directors of the last century, including Max Reinhardt, G. W. Pabst, Orson Welles, Robert Wilson, and Werner Herzog, have wrestled with their works, as have composers and writers from Alban Berg and Bertolt Brecht through Christa Wolf and Thalia Field. Rock artists as diverse as Tom Waits, Lou Reed, Duncan Sheik, and Metallica have recently rediscovered their urgency. Reading these works in translation and examining artistic creations they inspired. Classroom discussions and written responses; students also rehearse and present in-class performances of excerpts from the plays. The aim of these performances is not to produce polished stagings but to creatively engage with the texts and their interpretive traditions. No previous theatrical experience required.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

TAPS 133T: Transgender Performance and Performativity (FEMGEN 133)

This course examines theater, performance art, dance, and embodied practice by transgender artists. Students will learn the history and politics of transgender performance while considering the creative processes and formal aesthetics trans artists use to make art. We will analyze creative work in conversation with critical and theoretical texts from the fields of performance studies, art history, and queer studies.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

TAPS 139M: Ten Music Videos That Shook Design

This course uses commercial music videos as a springboard for teaching fundamental concepts in visual design. Students analyze popular music videos for key design elements (such as color, texture or light) and then explore these ideas through interactive assignments both in and out of class. Through class discussion and two written papers, students will build upon these core visual elements to discover meaning and value in the video as a whole. Students will learn a practical design vocabulary as well as visual research methods including online databases available through Stanford.nnCourse Objectives and Learning OutcomesnnIn this course, students will:nn1. Become familiar with fundamental design principles (such as color, texture and shape) through class discussion, group projects, individual creative projects and short written papers focused on a select group of music videos.nn2. Compare and contrast the use of these design principles in specific music videos.nn3. Justify the intellectual validity of pop culture by explicitly connecting music videos to broader historical, political and cultural themes.nn4. Learn how to use the resources of Stanford¿s Art & Architecture library, including the digital collections, to find historic photographs and art images for academic and design projects of any type.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Flatmo, E. (PI)

TAPS 151: Dramaturgy (TAPS 315)

This class examines the role of narrativity in live performance. Class topics range from the classics, to contemporary theater, dance, new media, performance art curatorship, and beyond, to grand social narratives. Integration of scholarship and practice is one of basic principles of dramaturgy, and this class follows in that spirit. Exploration of dramaturgical techniques is aimed to help students prepare to work on production dramaturgy. To that end, they will have an option to complete their final course assignment by serving as production dramaturgs on one of TAPS shows.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

TAPS 151C: Hamlet and the Critics (ENGLISH 115C, ENGLISH 215C, TAPS 251C)

Focus is on Shakespeare's Hamlet as a site of rich critical controversy from the eighteenth century to the present. Aim is to read, discuss, and evaluate different approaches to the play, from biographical, theatrical, and psychological to formalist, materialist, feminist, new historicist, and, most recently, quantitative. The ambition is to see whether there can be great literature without (a) great (deal of) criticism. The challenge is to understand the theory of literature through the study of its criticism.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Lupic, I. (PI)

TAPS 151T: Global Great Books: Dramatic Dialogues (COMPLIT 151T, COMPLIT 351T, TAPS 351)

The most influential and enduring texts in the dramatic canon from Sophocles to Shakespeare, Chekhov to Soyinka. Their historical and geopolitical contexts. Questions about the power dynamics involved in the formation of canons. This course counts as a Writing in the Major course for TAPS in 2016-17.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

TAPS 153M: Mechanics of the Theater: The Technologies of Stagecraft

This course explores the history of technologies vital to the theatre: traps, lifts, lights, and sounds have been crucial for creating stage illusion. Divided into three main sections, Mechanics and Machines, Lighting and Projections, and Acoustics and Sound, we will examine the history of technological innovation and theatrical experimentation from the Enlightenment to the present. We will also be conducting case studies for each section with a core text or texts. We will cover Shakespeare's Hamlet, Ibsen's Ghosts, Chekhov's The Seagull, and Dreamgirls, The Musical. n nTechnologies such as mechanical traps, electrical lights, and sound machines have been used to create stunning illusions and spectacular theater. Many of these technologies were also significant for the histories of industrialization and modernization. We will ask: How did theater makers develop and innovate using technological innovations? What role does technological aesthetics play in understanding human culture? What are the relationships between theater, technology, and society? In class, we will be reading, experimenting, and performing with various technological artifacts. We will be conducting experiments alongside our reading practice to better understand our historical subjects.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

TAPS 154G: Black Magic: Ethnicity, Race, and Identity in Performance Cultures (AFRICAAM 154G, CSRE 154D, FEMGEN 154G)

In 2013, CaShawn Thompson devised a Twitter hashtag, #blackgirlmagic, to celebrate the beauty and intelligence of black women. Twitter users quickly adopted the slogan, using the hashtag to celebrate everyday moments of beauty, accomplishment, and magic. In contrast, #blackmagic is used to describe everything from the uncanny to the personal. This course examines the discursive phenomenon of "black magic" and its permutations throughout Anglo-American histories. We will investigate the binaries of black/dark, white/light magic that has entered our contemporary lexicon, reading material on religion, magic performance, and theater.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

TAPS 156A: Warhol: Painting, Photography, Performance (ARTHIST 156A, ARTHIST 356A, TAPS 356A)

This course focuses on the career of Andy Warhol as a means to consider the broader history of American art and culture since 1950. It examines little-studied aspects of Warhol¿s visual production (e.g. his career as a commercial artist in the 1950s and his everyday photographs of the 1970s and 1980s) alongside his now-canonical Pop paintings of the 1960s. Warhol?s critical and scholarly reception will be scrutinized in detail, as will published interviews of and writings by the artist. Finally, we will consider Warhol¿s legacy and wide-ranging influence on American culture in the decades since his death in 1987.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

TAPS 156X: Theater of Dissent: Social Movements, Migration, and Revolution in the Americas (CSRE 156X)

TAPS 156X is an introductory level course that considers how theatre and performance provide a vital platform to examine political dissonance, the mobilities and (im)mobilities that shape transnational migration, and the formation of Latinx/Chicanx identity in the Americas. We will further examine the differences between key terminology in performance, including the notion of Latinidad, by looking at different aesthetic and socio-cultural performance practices and methodologies, re-occuring performance themes, and site-specific performance in the Americas. This course will primarily concentrate on works written in/about the Western Pacific US Southwest, Mexico, Argentina, Peru, Cuba, and Colombia through a variety of theatrical play texts, recorded performances, workshops, and creative projects.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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