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281 - 290 of 571 results for: all courses

GERMAN 131: What is German Literature?

What has it meant to be a German writer in the Middle Ages, the Holy Roman Empire, the Habsburg Monarchy, Nazi Germany, or the European Union? How might we think the relation between the unity of a language (the collection of dialects variously called German) and the forms of geographic, social, and political differentiation that give rise to what we today call German literature? This course will include political satires, cosmopolitan utopias, historical dramas, and propaganda poems, among literature from a number of different genres (novels, short stories, plays, poetry), political places (Austria, Prussia, Germany, Switzerland), and historical periods from the medieval to the present. Taught in German. Prerequisite: One year of German language at Stanford or equivalent.nAssistant Professor Lea Pao will teach this course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Pao, L. (PI)

GERMAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

Required gateway course for Philosophical and Literary Thought; crosslisted in departments sponsoring the Philosophy and Literature track. Majors should register in their home department; non-majors may register in any sponsoring department. Introduction to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature, with particular focus on the question of value: what, if anything, does engagement with literary works do for our lives? Issues include aesthetic self-fashioning, the paradox of tragedy, the paradox of caring, the truth-value of fiction, metaphor, authorship, irony, make-believe, expression, edification, clarification, and training. Readings are drawn from literature and film, philosophical theories of art, and stylistically interesting works of philosophy. Authors may include Sophocles, Chaucer, Dickinson, Proust, Woolf, Borges, Beckett, Kundera, Charlie Kaufman; Barthes, Foucault, Nussbaum, Walton, Nehamas; Plato, Montaigne, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 1C: Global History: Empires, Technology, and Modernity

How did the power of states evolve around the globe during the modern period? And how did it shape global experiences of modernity? In this course we will examine the development of technologies of rule from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century, from the age of empires and revolutions, through the world wars, the Cold War, and the war on terror. We will look at the political, social, cultural, and intellectual roots behind their invention and their results on the ground. In doing so, we will attempt to grasp the way they have shaped the history and experience of modernity. The course offers a broad overview not of a particular region but of the wider set of processes and technologies that connected the historical experiences of far-flung human communities. Topics include the evolution of government bureaucracies and classificatory schemes; the industrial revolution; technologies of rebellion and revolution; technologies of trade, including maps, ships, guns, and railroads; liberalism's urban technologies; airpower; the history and practice of development; camps and borders; and anti-colonial critiques of these various tools of empire. Through these, we will attempt to make sense of how the technologies of imperial power have shaped the bonds and inequalities of global capitalism and the world of nation-states. We will focus on different case studies each week to trace the unfolding of large-scale processes. Students will read primary sources (produced in the period) and historians¿ analyses of the events from a distance. The class is appropriate for beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students, and may be taken for different levels of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 12N: The Early Roman Emperors: HIstory, Biography, and Fiction

Preference to freshmen. The politics, drama, and characters of the period after the fall of the Roman Republic in 49 B.C.E. Issues of liberty and autocracy explored by Roman writers through history and biography. The nature of history writing, how expectations about literary genres shape the materials, the line between biography and fiction,and senatorial ideology of liberty. Readings include: Tacitus' Annals, Suetonius' Lives of the Caesers, and Robert Graves' I Claudius and episodes from the BBC series of the same title.
Last offered: Autumn 2008 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 20A: The Russian Empire, 1450-1800

(Same as HISTORY 120A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 120A.) Explores rise of Russian state and expanse of empire; patterns of governance of a Eurasian empire; strategies and institutions of governance; survey of various ethnic and religious groups in empire and their varied cultures and political economies; gender and family; serfdom; Russian Orthodox religion and culture; reforms and Europeanization of 18th century.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 20N: Russia in the Early Modern European Imagination

Preference to freshmen. The contrast between the early modern image of Europe as free, civilized, democratic, rational, and clean against the notion of New World Indians, Turks, and Chinese as savage. The more difficult, contemporary problem regarding E. Europe and Russia which seemed both European and exotic. Readings concerning E. Europe and Russia from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment; how they construct a positive image of Europe and conversely a negative stereotype of E. Europe. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI, Writing 2
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 36N: Gay Autobiography (FEMGEN 36N)

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED
Instructors: Robinson, P. (PI)

HISTORY 39: Modern Britain and the British Empire

(Same as HISTORY 139. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 139.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 48: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, CLASSICS 82, HISTORY 148)

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:EC-GlobalCom, GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI
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