2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

601 - 610 of 880 results for: all courses

OB 110N: Savvy: Learning How to Communicate with Purpose

Our seminar is designed for students interested in improving their communication skills. Right now, you probably don¿t spend much time thinking about the way you communicate, nor are you likely, in the academic setting, to get much feedback on the messages you send. Yet the quality of your communication will have a large impact on your overall effectiveness in building relationships and getting things done, both in the university setting and later in your career. Each of the sessions in our seminar will help you appreciate the nature and complexity of communication and provide guidelines for both improving your communication style and recognizing the unique styles of others. nnIn each class session, we¿ll consider a number of well-studied forms of interpersonal communication. And, we¿ll rely heavily on experiential learning to bring the concepts to life. For example, to better understand the dynamics of unstructured, spontaneous communication, we will participate in an improvisational theatre workshop, taught by one of the artists-in-residence at the Groundlings Theater in Los Angeles. To better understand persuasive communication tactics, we¿ll participate in role-play exercises, competitive games, and negotiation simulations. For each tactic, we¿ll talk about why it works, when it works best, and what its limitations might be. We¿ll discuss how you can put these approaches to work in order to support your goals. nnAfter taking this course, you will be better able to: (1) identify strategies for crafting effective communication in the form of everyday conversation, written work, and public presentations, (2) develop techniques for building strong, long-term relationships with your peers, and (3) become more persuasive in advancing an agenda, acquiring resources, or gaining support from others. These skills will be invaluable to you as you grow and develop here at Stanford and beyond.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Flynn, F. (PI)

OB 115N: Games, Decisions and Negotiations

This seminar is intended for students who are interested in how decisions happen and wish to expand their knowledge about the interactive processes involved in strategic decision-making. The course will draw on behavioral game theory to analyze and make sense of individual and group decision-making in negotiations, disputes, auctions, markets and other strategic interactions. nTo understand how decisions happen, we will use a combination of experiential exercises in class and in-depth discussions of theory and new and exciting research findings on cognitive and emotional aspects of decision making (e.g., what does "bounded-rationality" mean? how does power shape our negotiation behavior? how do our emotions influence our decisions?). We will play interactive games in our meetings to understand how various conditions, such as time pressure, power and uncertainty, influence our decisions. So, if you enjoy in-class exercises, you will enjoy our simulations. At the same time, if you enjoy analyzing human behavior and social interactions, you will like the readings and our discussions. After taking this course, you will be better able to identify and avoid common traps in strategic decision making and have a deeper understanding of other people's thinking and decision making processes.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

OSPAUSTL 40: Australian Studies

Introduction to Australian society, history, culture, politics, and identity. Social and cultural framework and working understanding of Australia in relationship to the focus on coastal environment in other program courses. Field trips.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPBEIJ 20: Communication, Culture, and Society: The Chinese Way

How people communicate, what they achieve through their communications, and the social and cultural consequences of these communicative behaviors. Focus on the interactive relationship between communication, culture and society in China. How communication habits are influenced by the individual¿s culture and how communication acts help to change and transform the society in which we live.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

OSPBEIJ 82: Globalization and the Chinese City

Dynamics of China¿s urban transformation and contemporary city life in the context of globalization. Applying interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives to selected themes related to the distinctive characteristics of China¿s urban development, students gain critical knowledge and understanding of how Chinese urban space is transformed by the forces of globalization, urbanization, marketization, and political decentralization; socio-spatial implications upon urban residents and the migrant population. Opportunities and challenges that Chinese cities face, given its current urban development strategies and trajectories. Field trips and site visits.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Shi, M. (PI)

OSPBER 37: Leading from Behind? Germany in the International Arena since 1945

Germany's changing role in European and world politics. Have old principles based on lessons from World War II become obsolete? Can Germany be a leading power in global affairs?
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Tempel, S. (PI)

OSPBER 70: The Long Way to the West: German History from the 18th Century to the Present

Battles still current within Germany¿s collective memory. Sources include the narrative resources of museums, and experts on the German history in Berlin and Potsdam. Field trips.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Jander, M. (PI)

OSPBER 71: EU in Crisis

Challenges confronting Europe as a whole and the EU in particular: impact of the sovereign debt crisis of the Eurozone, mass migration, external and internal security challenges, as well as political and social needs for reform. How the EU and its members respond and if the opportunities of these crises are constructively used for reform - or wasted (Crisis = Danger + Opportunity). Analyse institutions, interests and competing narratives to explain the current situation in Europe. Excursion to Athens or similar to get a non-German perspective on the crises.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bruckner, U. (PI)

OSPBER 72: Economics and the City: Evidence from the Division and Reunification of Germany

Introduction to Urban Economics, from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. Emphasis on the use of "natural experiments" used by social scientists to learn about the economics of cities without the ability to conduct randomized control trials. These principles applied in the context of Berlin, whose remarkable division and reunification can teach us about the forces that cause cities to exist and the role that they plan in the wider economy.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

OSPBER 115X: The German Economy: Past and Present

The unsteady history of the German economy in the Wilhelmine Empire, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, the post WWII divided and united Germany. Special attention on the economic policy of the Third Reich and the present role of Germany in the world economy
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Klein, I. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints