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INTNLREL 200B: International Relations Honors Seminar

Second of two-part sequence. For seniors working on their honors theses. Professional tools, analysis of research findings, and initial steps in writing of thesis. How to write a literature review, formulate a chapter structure, and set a timeline and work schedule for the senior year. Skills such as data analysis and presentation, and writing strategies. Prerequisites: acceptance to IR honors program, and 199 or 200A. * Course satisfies the WiM requirement for International Relations majors who are accepted into the IR Honors program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Gould, E. (PI)

ITALIAN 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (FRENCH 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

ITALIAN 155: The Mafia in Society, Film, and Fiction

The mafia has become a global problem through its infiltration of international business, and its model of organized crime has spread all over the world from its origins in Sicily. At the same time, film and fiction remain fascinated by a romantic, heroic vision of the mafia. Compares both Italian and American fantasies of the Mafia to its history and impact on Italian and global culture. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

ITALIAN 175: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, , and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

JAPAN 82N: Joys and Pains of Growing Up and Older in Japan

What do old and young people share in common? With a focus on Japan, a country with a large long-living population, this seminar spotlights older people's lives as a reflectiion of culture and society, history, and current social and personal changes. Through discussion of multidisciplinary studies on age, analysis of narratives, and films, we will gain a closer understanding of Japanese society and the multiple meanings of growing up and older. Students will also create a short video/audio profile of an older individual, and we will explore cross-cultural comparisons. Held in Knight Bldg. Rm. 201.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JAPAN 191: Japanese Pragmatics (JAPAN 291)

The choice of linguistic expressions and our understanding of what is said involve multiple sociocultural, cognitive and discourse factors. Can such pragmatic factors and processes be considered universal to all languages, or are there variations among languages? The course will investigate an array of phenomena observed in Japanese. Through readings and projects, students will deepen their knowledge of Japanese and consider theoretical implications. Prerequisites: one year of Japanese and a course in linguistics, or two years of Japanese, or consent of instructor.
| UG Reqs: WAY-SI

JEWISHST 4N: A World History of Genocide (HISTORY 4N)

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 13C: Talking About Jews (HISTORY 13C)

Professors Beinin and Zipperstein will initiate discussions on a broad range of topics related to Jews and Jewish identity in the modern world and then invite the class to join in the discussion. Topics include: Who are the Jews, secularism, Jewish capitalists and leftists, anti-Semitism, Israel and Zionism, Jews in American life. For the one unit option attendance at the discussions is required. For the three unit option, students will do the prescribed readings and attend a discussion section.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 38A: Germany and the World Wars, 1870-1990 (HISTORY 38A)

(Same as HISTORY 138A. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 138A.) This course examines Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. During this time, Germany ushered in five regimes and two world wars, seesawing between material ruin and economic prosperity on the frontline of Europe¿s military and ideological rifts. Beginning with Bismarck¿s wars of unification, the class spans World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

JEWISHST 84S: Between Toleration and Persecution: Iran and its Minorities in the Twentieth Century (HISTORY 84S)

What does it mean to be Jewish or Christian in a country where most citizens are categorized as Shi'i Muslims? How have Kurds and Azeris figured into Iranian national and political rhetoric? What has it meant to identify as transgender or transsexual? This course explores religious, ethnic, and sexual minority groups in Iran in the twentieth century. Topics include minority rights, identity formation, minorities¿ involvement in political movements, the impact of westernizing efforts on minorities, and the Iranian diaspora. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Farah, D. (PI)
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