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ILAC 235: Critique of Technology (STS 200L)

Informed citizens living in today'¬ôs world, and especially in Silicon Valley, should be able to formulate their own articulate positions about the role of technology in culture. The course gives students the tools to do so. Against the trend towards the thoughtless celebration of all things technological, we will engage in critique in the two senses of the term: as careful study of the cultural implications of technology and as balanced, argumentative criticism. Can technology make life more meaningful, society more fair, people smarter, and the world smaller? We will pay special attention to the insights that literature, and other arts, can offer for reframing digital culture. Selections by Latin American fiction writers (Cortázar, Zambra), philosophers and thinkers (Heidegger and Beller), as well as recent popular works of social commentary, such as You are not a Gadget, The Shallows, 24/7, and Present Shock. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Hoyos, H. (PI)

ILAC 246: Critical Issues of Human Rights through Literature

This course seeks to explain some of the most relevant contemporary problems of contemporary human rights through the eyes of literature. Through novels, the course problematizes some issues of human rights that, from a legal perspective, are simplified or captured merely through legal forms i.e. rules. These novels highlight the social and political tensions involved in the rise of human rights and in some of its most urgent problems during their short history. Human rights legal forms generally simplify a wider array of tensions that this course brings to the foreground. Taught in Spanish. INSTRUCTOR: Jorge González-Jacome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 62Q: MASS ATROCITIES AND RECONCILIATION

This seminar considers the theory and practice of transitional justice as exemplified by diverse case studies, such as Germany, South Africa, Bosnia, and Rwanda. We will ask ourselves throughout the term whether and to what extent mass atrocities and grave human rights violations can be ameliorated and healed, and what legal, institutional, and political arrangements may be most conducive to such attempts. We will study war crimes tribunals and truth commissions, and we will ask about their effectiveness, especially in regards to their potential of fostering reconciliation in a given society. In every case we will encounter and evaluate specific shortcomings and obstacles, which will provide us with a more nuanced understanding of the complex process of coming to terms with the past.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Lutomski, P. (PI)

INTNLREL 101Z: Introduction to International Relations (POLISCI 101Z)

Approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Applications to war, terrorism, trade policy, the environment, and world poverty. Debates about the ethics of war and the global distribution of wealth.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Tomz, M. (PI)

INTNLREL 102: History of the International System (HISTORY 102)

After defining the characteristics of the international system at the beginning of the twentieth century, this course reviews the primary developments in its functioning in the century that followed. Topics include the major wars and peace settlements; the emergence of Nazism and Communism; the development of the Cold War and nuclear weapons; the rise of China, India, and the EU; and the impact of Islamic terrorism. The role of international institutions and international society will also be a focus as will the challenge of environment, health, poverty, and climate issues to the functioning of the system.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

INTNLREL 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, EMED 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

INTNLREL 110C: America and the World Economy (POLISCI 110C, POLISCI 110X)

Examination of contemporary US foreign economic policy. Areas studied: the changing role of the dollar; mechanism of international monetary management; recent crises in world markets including those in Europe and Asia; role of IMF, World Bank and WTO in stabilizing world economy; trade politics and policies; the effects of the globalization of business on future US prosperity. Enroll in PoliSci 110C for WIM credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 110D: War and Peace in American Foreign Policy (AMSTUD 110D, POLISCI 110D, POLISCI 110Y)

(Students not taking this course for WIM, register for 110Y.) The causes of war in American foreign policy. Issues: international and domestic sources of war and peace; war and the American political system; war, intervention, and peace making in the post-Cold War period.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 114D: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (IPS 230, POLISCI 114D, POLISCI 314D)

Links among the establishment of democracy, economic growth, and the rule of law. How democratic, economically developed states arise. How the rule of law can be established where it has been historically absent. Variations in how such systems function and the consequences of institutional forms and choices. How democratic systems have arisen in different parts of the world. Available policy instruments used in international democracy, rule of law, and development promotion efforts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Fukuyama, F. (PI)

INTNLREL 122: Introduction to European Studies (POLISCI 213E)

This course offers an introduction to major topics in the study of historical and contemporary Europe. We focus on European politics, economics and culture. First, we study what makes Europe special, and how its distinct identity has been influenced by its history. Next, we analyze Europe's politics. We study parliamentary government and proportional representation electoral systems, and how they affect policy. Subsequently, we examine the challenges the European economy faces. We further study the European Union and transatlantic relations.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Crombez, C. (PI)
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