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GERMAN 109: The End of Europe (as we know it) - Germany and the Future of the European Union

Europe is struggling with the impact of the sovereign debt crisis of the Eurozone, mass migration, political extremism and xenophobia, external and internal security challenges, as well as political and social needs for reform to mention only some of the most pressing problems. The European Union, a project of an ever closer union of European states with currently 28 members started with the promise to provide peace, stability and prosperity. This narrative attracted new members in five enlargement rounds since the 1970s while today Eurosceptic parties, separatist movements as well as internal and external critics of the EU question the European integration project as such. nnThe course starts with the narrative of the success story of European integration and its achievements. This is followed by an analysis of current crises and future problems. In a third step we will discuss consequences and strategies to deal with challenges for Europe as a whole, as well as the EU and its members in particular. The course will follow ongoing debates within and outside of the EU. It includes global reflections on the state European situation and it makes comparisons with responses to similar challenges in other parts of the world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Bruckner, U. (PI)

GERMAN 120: Contemporary Politics in Germany

This course provides an opportunity to engage with issues and actors, politicians and parties in contemporary Germany, while building German language abilities. We will work with current events texts, news reports, speeches and websites. Course goals include building analytic and interpretive capacities of political topics in today's Europe, including the European Union, foreign policy, and environmentalism. Differences between US and German political culture are a central topic. At least one year German language study required.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

GERMAN 120Q: Contemporary Politics in Germany

This course provides an opportunity to engage with issues and actors, politicians and parties in contemporary Germany, while building German language abilities. We will work with current events texts, news reports, speeches and websites. Course goals include building analytic and interpretive capacities of political topics in today's Europe, including the European Union, foreign policy, and environmentalism. Differences between US and German political culture are a central topic. At least one year German language study required.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

GERMAN 132: Dynasties, Dictators and Democrats: History and Politics in Germany (COMPLIT 132A)

Key moments in German history through documents: personal accounts, political speeches and texts, and literary works. The course begins with the Prussian monarchy and proceeds to the crisis years of the French Revolution. Documents from the 1848 revolution and the age of Bismarck and German unification follow. World War I and its impact on Germany, including the rise of Hitler, as well as the aftermath, divided Germany in the Cold War through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Taught in German.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bruckner, U. (PI)

GERMAN 175: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, , and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

GERMAN 182: War and Warfare in Germany

Survey of Germany at war through historical, theoretical and literary accounts. War in the international system and the role of technology. Religious wars, rationalization of warfare, violence and politics, terrorism. War films, such as All Quiet on the Western Front. Readings by authors such as Clausewitz, Jünger, Remarque, Schimtt, and Arendt. Taught in English.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

GERMAN 251: Youth Culture

Beginning after World War I, the seminar discusses youth as a special phase in life course in the context of political, social and cultural change. Which tasks and problems did society, schools, and parents submit to youth, and how did that change throughout the history of the twentieth century? Youth cultures of different social classes in Germany, and German youth literature will be analyzed. In the seminar, it will also be discussed if youth and youth culture became of more importance for the growing ups throughout the twentieth century. It will be analyzed, if the generational conflicts in society and families have increased in the twentieth century. The impact of political regimes, economy and media on youth and youth cultures will be discussed, too. The seminar starts with the Bündische Jugend in the Weimar Republic, continues with the Hitler-Jugend in Nazi-Germany and the Halbstarke in the 1950ies and goes to the movement of 1968 at the German universities.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

GLOBAL 190: Illicit Trade in Art and Antiquities (GLOBAL 390, JEWISHST 130, JEWISHST 330, PUBLPOL 191, PUBLPOL 391)

Illicit trade in art and antiquities is reputedly the third largest illicit trade activity globally. How do nations, individually and collectively, respond to this seemingly inexorable form of illicit trade, and what factors influence those responses? What are the sources and effects of such trade, and how can it best be curbed? This course will delve into these and other pressing political, legal, ethical, economic, cultural and public policy questions about illicit art and antiquities trade, arising across five subject areas: (1) the acquisition of art during the Age of Imperialism (ie, from Roman times through World War II); (2) Holocaust-era takings and the evolution in international legal and ethical responses to wartime looting; (3) removal and repatriation of Indigenous cultural material; (4) theft from museums and private collectors, and legal systems¿ varying allocation of the risk of such theft; and (5) the illicit trade and destruction of antiquities, and issues surrounding their restitution. Several internationally renowned guest speakers will give presentations and contribute to our discussions. Grading will be based on attendance, participation in class and an online discussion forum, a student group presentation, and a final exam or research paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Jessiman, S. (PI)

GSBGEN 113N: The Economic Survival of the Performing Arts

Even the most artistically accomplished and well-managed performing arts organizations--symphony orchestras, operas, dance companies, and many theaters--tend to live on the edge financially. In fact, most performing arts groups are organized as nonprofit organizations, because they cannot make enough money to cover costs and survive as profit-seeking businesses. In this seminar we will explore the reasons for the tension between artistic excellence and economic security,drawing on the experience of performing arts organizations in the United States and in countries(whose governments have adopted quite different policies toward the arts). Using economic concepts and analysis that we develop in the seminar, you will first examine the fundamental reasons for the economic challenges faced by performing arts organizations. In later sessions, we will consider and evaluate alternative solutions to these challenges in the United States and other countries. The seminar may include meetings with managers and/or trustees of arts organizations.nnnBy the end of the seminar, you will be able to assess the economic condition of an arts organization, evaluate alternative strategies for its survival, and understand the consequences of alternative government policies toward the arts.nnnDuring the early part of the course, you will prepare two short papers on topics or questions that I will suggest. Later, you will prepare a longer paper applying concepts learned to one of the performing arts or a particular arts organization that interests you. You will submit that paper in stages, as you learn about concepts and issues that are relevant to your analysis. There will also be a final exam.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 1A: Global History: The Ancient World (CLASSICS 76)

World history from the origins of humanity to the Black Death. Focuses on the evolution of complex societies, wealth, violence, and hierarchy, emphasizing the three great turning points in early history: the evolution of modern humans, the agricultural revolution, and the rise of the state.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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