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321 - 330 of 891 results for: all courses

FEMGEN 272E: Theories of Citizenship and Sovereignty in a Transnational Context (AMSTUD 272E, CHILATST 172, CSRE 172H, HISTORY 272E, HISTORY 372E)

This course explores the multiple meanings of citizenship and the ways in which they change when examined using different geographic scales (from the local to the transnational). The course will pair theoretical readings on citizenship with case studies that focus on North America. Topics include: definitions of citizenship; the interrelation of ideas of citizenship with those of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality; the relationship between sovereignty and territoriality; human and civil rights; and immigration.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 293B: Queer History in Comparative Perspective (FEMGEN 393B, HISTORY 293B, HISTORY 393B)

Comparative history of homoerotic desire, relations, and identity through scholarship on different historical periods and parts of the world: the classical Mediterranean, early modern European cities, late imperial and modern China, Tokugawa and modern Japan, and the U.S.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Sommer, M. (PI)

FEMST 173: Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives (EDUC 173, EDUC 273, SOC 173, SOC 273)

This course examines the ways in which higher education structures and policies affect females, males, and students in relation to each other and how changes in those structures and policies improve experiences for females and males similarly or differently. Students are expected to gain an understanding of theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to an understanding of the role of higher education in relation to structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Topics include undergraduate and graduate education; identity and sexuality; gender and science; gender and faculty; and the development of feminist scholarship and pedagogy. Attention is paid to how these issues are experienced by women and men in the United States, including people of color, and by academics throughout the world, and how these have changed over time.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FRENCH 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (ITALIAN 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

FRENCH 131: Absolutism, Enlightenment, and Revolution in 17th- and 18th-Century France

The literature, culture, and politics of France from Louis XIV to Olympe de Gouges. How this period produced the political and philosophical foundations of modernity. Readings may include Corneille, Molière, Racine, Lafayette, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Beaumarchais, and Gouges. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

FRENCH 175: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, , and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

FRENCH 206: The "Renaissance" of the Twelfth Century

This course examines key intellectual, social and political developments in Europe during the twelfth century, and inquires after the afterlife of the "€œRenaissance"€ into the thirteenth century. Readings include works of literature (Chrétien de Troyes, lyric poetry of troubadours and Minnesinger, fables such as Roman de Renart), philosophy (Peter Abelard and scholasticism), and studies about the rise of the Gothic architectural style. The course takes up the Fourth Lateran Council and the history of the crusading movement in the first half of the thirteenth century. Taught in English.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

FRENCH 208: When Europe Spoke French: The Power of Culture and the Culture of Power

For much of modern history (ca. 1600-1900), French culture occupied a similar global place that American culture does today: it was the preferred "other" culture in the realms of entertainment, research, and polite conversation. As with America today, the French state was also a military superpower in European and global affairs. This course will explore how French culture and government combined to create this new model of culture based on refinement and the projection of power. Expressed through language, literature, and architecture (most famously, Versailles), this elite form of culture would come to symbolize education and social status from Lisbon to St-Petersburg. Readings will include historical accounts of early-modern France and Europe, as well as works by Corneille, Molière, Racine, Voltaire, Montesquieu, and Rousseau. Taught in French.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

FRENCH 238: Art and the Market (ARTHIST 238C)

This course examines the relationship between art and the market, from the château-builders of the French Renaissance to avant-garde painters in the nineteenth-century Salon des Refusés. Using examples drawn from France, this course explores the relationship between artists and patrons, the changing status of artists in society, patterns of shifting taste, and the effects of museums on making and collecting art. Students will read a mixture of historical texts about art and artists, fictional works depicting the process of artistic creation, and theoretical analyses of the politics embedded in artworks. They will engage in sustained analysis of individual artworks, as well as the market structures in which such artworks were produced and bought. The course will be taught in English, with the option of readings in French for departmental majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Pesic, A. (PI)

FRENCH 241: Far From Paris: The Provinces in 19-Century French Fiction

More than any other European country and any other period, 19th century France seems to be dominated by the conflict between capital and periphery, between Paris and the provinces. If Paris was the capital of the 19th century, then what of the rest of France? Is it a space of conservatism, boredom, and stagnation, or one of natural beauty, escape, and transgression? In this seminar we will look at how French novels of the period analyzed and re-imagined life outside of Paris and, conversely, how a sense of what life in the provinces is had a reflection on different novelistic genres. Readings by Balzac, Flaubert, Hugo, Sand, and Zola. Taught in French.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
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