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FEMGEN 111: Reproductive Politics in the United States and Abroad (AMSTUD 111)

Course description: This course examines the issues and debates surrounding women's reproduction in the United States and beyond. It pays special attention to how knowledge and technology travel across national/cultural borders and how women's reproductive functions are deeply connected to international politics and events abroad. Topics include: birth control, population control, abortion, sex education, sex trafficking, genetic counseling, assisted reproductive technologies, midwifery, breastfeeding, menstruation, and reproductive hazards.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Takeuchi, A. (PI)

FEMGEN 134: The Marriage Plot

The centrality of the marriage plot in the development of the British novel beginning in the 18th century with Samuel Richardson's Pamela and ending with Woolf's modernist novel Mrs. Dalloway. The relationship between novelistic plotting and the development of female characters into marriageable women. What is the relationship between the novel and feminine subjectivity? What aspects of marriage make it work as a plotting device? What kinds of marriages do marriage plots allow? Is the development of women's political agency related to their prominence in the novel form?
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 138: Men's Violence Against Women in Literature: A Critical and Social Analysis (FEMGEN 238)

Literature, as a social and cultural product of its time, can inform and deepen our understanding of oppression. Using literature as a vehicle, this course will explore the impact of and responses to men's violence against women. Students will critically assess how the author has portrayed the topic of sexual assault and relationship abuse, how the characters and/or author exhibits victim blaming, and, if the characters were living today, would current policies adequately hold the perpetrator responsible, provide safety and justice for the survivor, and challenge rape culture. In dialogue with theoretical texts, we will analyze the literary representations of patriarchy that inform societal acceptance of gender-based violence, identify the historical prevalence of victim blaming and impunity in these works, and assess the implications on policy making at the individual, community and political level. Students will critically examine literature including Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Ubervilles, Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, Louise Erdrich's The Round House and Joyce Carol Oates' We Were the Mulvaneys.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Baran, N. (PI)

FEMGEN 140D: LGBT/Queer Life in the United States (FEMGEN 240D, HISTORY 257C)

An introductory course that explores LGBT/Queer social, cultural, and political history in the United States. By analyzing primary documents that range from personal accounts (private letters, autobiography, early LGBT magazines, and oral history interviews) to popular culture (postcards, art, political posters, lesbian pulp fiction, and film) to medical, military, and legal papers, students will understand how the categories of gender and sexuality have changed over the past 150 years. This class investigates the relationship among queer, straight and transgender identities. Seminar discussions will question how the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality influenced the construction of these categories.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 144: Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering (HISTORY 144)

(Same as HISTORY 44. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, GER:EC-Gender

FEMGEN 155: The Changing American Family (FEMGEN 255, SOC 155, SOC 255)

Family change from historical, social, demographic, and legal perspectives. Extramarital cohabitation, divorce, later marriage, interracial marriage, and same-sex cohabitation. The emergence of same-sex marriage as a political issue. Are recent changes in the American family really as dramatic as they seem? Theories about what causes family systems to change.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 156H: Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors (AMSTUD 156H, HISTORY 156G)

Women's bodies in sickness and health, and encounters with lay and professional healers from the 18th century to the present. Historical consttruction of thought about women's bodies and physical limitations; sexuality; birth control and abortion; childbirth; adulthood; and menopause and aging. Women as healers, including midwives, lay physicians, the medical profession, and nursing.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Horn, M. (PI)

FEMGEN 156X: Language and Gender (LINGUIST 156)

The role of language in the construction of gender, the maintenance of the gender order, and social change. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No knowledge of linguistics required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 157: Language as Political Tool: Feminist and LGBTQ Movements and Impacts (AMSTUD 157X, FEMGEN 257)

How does a social or political movement gain traction? For example, how did 20th-century movements of the disenfranchised, such as the Civil Rights movement, LGBTQ movements, or feminist movements, gain a voice and eventually enact change? In the mediascape of today, where everyone with access to a computer could have a voice, how does a movement change the national conversation? How do written and verbal choices of the movements impact their success and outreach to supporters? In this course, students will write and revise their own arguments in order to best understand the rhetorical potential in these movements¿ choices and to consider how those rhetorical moves are incorporated into political discourse. We'll examine the role of rhetoric, the use of argument to persuade, in social movements working toward social justice, party platforms, and public policy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Hanlon, P. (PI)

FEMGEN 161: Women in Modern America (AMSTUD 161, CSRE 162, HISTORY 161)

This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern womanhood in the U.S. from the 1890s to the end of the 20th century, including the experiences of Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women. It asks how, when, and why the majority of American women become wage earners, gained full citizenship, and enacted political opportunities; how race- and class-specific ideals of womanhood changed in popular culture; and how women have redefined their reproductive and sexual relations.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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