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481 - 490 of 879 results for: all courses

HISTORY 247J: History and Memory in Africa (HISTORY 347J)

Scholars, like the English social historian H. Trevor-Roper and the philosopher-historian Georg Hegel, once denied that Africa even had a history worth telling. We know better. Rich accounts of African pasts have been constructed by historians who pioneered linguistics, oral tradition and folklore research, documentary analysis, archaeology, and other methods. At the same time, Africans' own accounts of the past are often passed down through memories and commemorations that are shared, disputed, and memorialized within their communities. In many cases, historians and African communities manage to work together to construct shared understandings of the past, but sometimes their interpretations conflict with each other. In this course, we will look at the ways that history and memory overlap in Africa, beginning with the Atlantic slave trade and focusing on two particular events -- the Ethiopian victory over Italy at the Battle of Adwa and the abortive 19th century West African attempt to construct an independent state known as the Fante Confederation. We will work with all kinds of primary sources from the past as well as music videos, architecture, documentaries, official celebrations, museum exhibitions, and performances to construct arguments that take into account methodology, ethics, and philosophy within and beyond the discipline of history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Getz, T. (PI)

HISTORY 248S: Colonial States and African Societies, Part I (HISTORY 448A)

Colonialism set in motion profound transformations of African societies. These transformations did not occur immediately following military conquest, nor did they occur uniformly throughout the continent. This research seminar will focus directly on the encounter between the colonial state and African societies. The seminar will examine problems of social transformation, the role of the colonial state, and the actions of Africans. Following four weeks of collloquim style discussion, students then embark on independent research on the encounter between one colonial state and its constituent African societies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Roberts, R. (PI)

HISTORY 250E: Taxing America: From the Puritans to Prop. 13

Taxes have shaped American society and politics since before the Revolution. And they've been extremely controversial just as long. In this course we'll try to understand American society and government by looking at the politics of taxation from the colonial period to the twentieth century. Topics include the legitimacy of taxation, the constitution, economic development, inequality, gender, and race.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 253F: Thinking the American Revolution (HISTORY 353F)

No period in American history has generated as much creative political thinking as the era of the American Revolution. This course explores the origins and development of that thought from the onset of the dispute between Great Britain and its American colonies over liberty and governance through the debates surrounding the construction and implementation of the United States Federal Constitution. Readings will principally be based in primary sources with some weeks supplemented by secondary sources.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 254: Popular Culture and American Nature

Despite John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson, it is arguable that the Disney studios have more to do with molding popular attitudes toward the natural world than politicians, ecologists, and activists. Disney as the central figure in the 20th-century American creation of nature. How Disney, the products of his studio, and other primary and secondary texts see environmentalism, science, popular culture, and their interrelationships.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 254G: The Causes and Consequences of the American Revolution

Why did Britain's North American colonies declare independence from an empire they had long revered? What did the American Revolution mean for the people who experienced it? In this course we will explore the explosive origins of the American republic. Topics: revolutionary ideology, empire, the federal constitution, slavery, social conflict, and the international consequences of the American Revolution.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 256E: American Civil War

This course examines the Civil War through multiple lenses, which will include the common political and military narrative but emphasize other themes, such as the social experiences of soldiers and slaves, the social effect of industrial-scale death, war profiteering and the foundations of postwar industrial capitalism, and the meaning of freedom. It will also consider the American Civil War as a pivotal event in global history, and examine the politicized uses of the war as memory.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 256G: Constructing Race and Religion in America (CSRE 246, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 246, RELIGST 346)

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lum, K. (PI)

HISTORY 257: Was the American Revolution a Social Revolution? (HISTORY 357)

What kind of a revolution was the American Revolution? The revolution gave colonial Americans political independence from Britain to found the United States. But did the revolution also transform American society in its wake? This course explores how historians and historical participants alike have answered this question paying attention to historical changes (or lack thereof) that took place in American society between c. 1750-1820 as well as grappling with what conceptually constitutes a "social" revolution in the first place.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 257C: LGBT/Queer Life in the United States (FEMGEN 140D, FEMGEN 240D)

An introductory course that explores LGBT/Queer social, cultural, and political history in the United States. By analyzing primary documents that range from personal accounts (private letters, autobiography, early LGBT magazines, and oral history interviews) to popular culture (postcards, art, political posters, lesbian pulp fiction, and film) to medical, military, and legal papers, students will understand how the categories of gender and sexuality have changed over the past 150 years. This class investigates the relationship among queer, straight and transgender identities. Seminar discussions will question how the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality influenced the construction of these categories.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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