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111 - 120 of 879 results for: all courses

ARTSINST 182: Activating Urban Spaces (CEE 131F, URBANST 182)

This course will look at how public urban spaces are structured with a particular eye to the involvement of art and artists, whether formally or informally, in shaping the built and social environment of the city. Throughout the course particular focus will consider the possibilities for engaging social justice outcomes through spatial intervention drawing on examples from around the world. Interventions in urban spaces enact local change by making art the language of civic engagement; in this way a mural or performance or reconceptualized public space can become a method to address issues of locally prioritized inequality. We will use Stanford University and the Bay Area as our local research sites, making trips into the field to analyze methods, approaches, and experiences of urban spaces in action as well as bringing experts who work in related fields into the classroom. Sites of study include parks, public art, and street festivals by looking at arts organizations, city projects, community groups, and individual artists. The class will operate as a hybrid seminar and collaborative studio workspace which supports students in using ethnographic, visual, mapping, historical, and participatory methods in developing projects that respond to a particular site of their choosing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Taylor, J. (PI)

ASNAMST 146S: Asian American Culture and Community (AMSTUD 146, COMPLIT 146, CSRE 146S)

This course introduces students to the histories of Asians in America, specifically as these histories are part of a broader Asia-US-Pacific history that characterized the 20th century and now the 21st. We will combine readings in history, literature, sociology, with community-based learning.nnThe course takes place over two quarters. The first quarter focuses on gaining knowledge of Asian America and discussion key topics that students wish to focus on collaboratively. During this first quarter we also learn about community-based learning, set up teams and projects, and develop relationships with community organizations. The second quarter students work with student liaisons (senior students who have experience in service learning) and complete their work with the community¿there are no formal class meetings this second quarter. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Course can be repeated once.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ASNAMST 265: Writing Asian American History (AMSTUD 265, HISTORY 265, HISTORY 365)

Recent scholarship in Asian American history, with attention to methodologies and sources. Topics: racial ideologies, gender, transnationalism, culture, and Asian American art history. Primary research paper.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIOE 122: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response (EMED 122, PUBLPOL 122)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 4 units for twice weekly attendance (Mon. and Wed.); additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

BIOMEDIN 156: Economics of Health and Medical Care (BIOMEDIN 256, ECON 126, HRP 256)

Institutional, theoretical, and empirical analysis of the problems of health and medical care. Topics: demand for medical care and medical insurance; institutions in the health sector; economics of information applied to the market for health insurance and for health care; measurement and valuation of health; competition in health care delivery. Graduate students with research interests should take ECON 249. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and either ECON 102A or STATS 116 or the equivalent. Recommended: ECON 51.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CEE 107A: Understanding Energy (CEE 207A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 126: International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development (EARTHSYS 138, IPS 274, URBANST 145)

Comparative approach to sustainable cities, with focus on international practices and applicability to China. Tradeoffs regarding land use, infrastructure, energy and water, and the need to balance economic vitality, environmental quality, cultural heritage, and social equity. Student teams collaborate with Chinese faculty and students partners to support urban sustainability projects. Limited enrollment via application; see internationalurbanization.org for details. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor(s).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 131F: Activating Urban Spaces (ARTSINST 182, URBANST 182)

This course will look at how public urban spaces are structured with a particular eye to the involvement of art and artists, whether formally or informally, in shaping the built and social environment of the city. Throughout the course particular focus will consider the possibilities for engaging social justice outcomes through spatial intervention drawing on examples from around the world. Interventions in urban spaces enact local change by making art the language of civic engagement; in this way a mural or performance or reconceptualized public space can become a method to address issues of locally prioritized inequality. We will use Stanford University and the Bay Area as our local research sites, making trips into the field to analyze methods, approaches, and experiences of urban spaces in action as well as bringing experts who work in related fields into the classroom. Sites of study include parks, public art, and street festivals by looking at arts organizations, city projects, community groups, and individual artists. The class will operate as a hybrid seminar and collaborative studio workspace which supports students in using ethnographic, visual, mapping, historical, and participatory methods in developing projects that respond to a particular site of their choosing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Taylor, J. (PI)

CEE 177L: Smart Cities & Communities (CEE 277L)

A city is comprised of people and a complex system of systems. Data provides the connective tissue between those systems. Smart cities use information technology (IT) to harness that data for operational efficiency, efficacy of government services, and sustainability. Key enablers covered include: IoT, open data, analytics, cloud and cognitive computing, and systems of engagement. System case studies will include: water, energy, transportation, buildings, food production, urban design, and social services. The evolving relationship between a city and its citizens as well as the risks / challenges of smart cities will also be explored.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHILATST 14N: Growing Up Bilingual (CSRE 14N, EDUC 114N)

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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