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361 - 370 of 493 results for: all courses

POLISCI 114S: International Security in a Changing World (HISTORY 104D, IPS 241)

This class surveys the most pressing global security problems facing the world today and includes an award-winning two-day international crisis simulation. Past guest lecturers have included former Secretary of Defense William Perry, former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Gen. Karl Eikenberry, and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Major topics covered: changing types of warfare, ethics and conduct of war, nuclear proliferation, insurgency and terrorism, Russia, and ISIS. No prior background in international relations is necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

POLISCI 116: The International History of Nuclear Weapons (HISTORY 103E)

An introduction to the history of nuclear weapons from World War II to the present. The focus is on politics, but the role of technology transfer ¿ whether legal or illicit ¿ in the development of nuclear weapons will be examined; so too will the theories about the military and political utility of nuclear weapons. We will look at the efforts to control and abolish nuclear weapons and at the international institutions created to reduce the danger of nuclear war.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Holloway, D. (PI)

POLISCI 118P: U.S. Relations in Iran

The evolution of relations between the U.S. and Iran. The years after WW II when the U.S. became more involved in Iran. Relations after the victory of the Islamic republic. The current state of affairs and the prospects for the future. Emphasis is on original documents of U.S. diplomacy (White House, State Department, and the U.S. Embassy in Iran). Research paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

POLISCI 120B: Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections (COMM 162, COMM 262)

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

POLISCI 120C: What's Wrong with American Government? An Institutional Approach (PUBLPOL 124)

How politicians, once elected, work together to govern America. The roles of the President, Congress, and Courts in making and enforcing laws. Focus is on the impact of constitutional rules on the incentives of each branch, and on how they influence law. Fulfills the Writing in the Major Requirement for Political Science majors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

POLISCI 121: Political Power in American Cities (AMSTUD 121Z, PUBLPOL 133, URBANST 111)

The major actors, institutions, processes, and policies of sub-state government in the U.S., emphasizing city general-purpose governments through a comparative examination of historical and contemporary politics. Issues related to federalism, representation, voting, race, poverty, housing, and finances.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

POLISCI 121L: Racial-Ethnic Politics in US (AMSTUD 121L, CSRE 121L, PUBLPOL 121L)

This course examines various issues surrounding the role of race and ethnicity in the American political system. Specifically, this course will evaluate the development of racial group solidarity and the influence of race on public opinion, political behavior, the media, and in the criminal justice system. We will also examine the politics surrounding the Multiracial Movement and the development of racial identity and political attitudes in the 21st century. Stats 60 or Econ 1 is strongly recommended.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

POLISCI 122: Introduction to American Law (AMSTUD 179, PUBLPOL 302A)

For undergraduates. The structure of the American legal system including the courts; American legal culture; the legal profession and its social role; the scope and reach of the legal system; the background and impact of legal regulation; criminal justice; civil rights and civil liberties; and the relationship between the American legal system and American society in general.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

POLISCI 123: Politics and Public Policy (AMSTUD 123X, POLISCI 102, PUBLPOL 101, PUBLPOL 201)

(Formerly PS 2) American political institutions (the Presidency, Congress, and the Court) and political processes (the formation of political attitudes and voting) have for some time now been criticized as inadequate to the task of making modern public policy. Against the backdrop of American culture and political history we examine how public policy has been and is being made. We use theories from Political Science and Economics to assess the state of the American system and the policy making process. We use case studies and lectures to analyze contemporary issues including environmental policy, taxes and spending , gun control , economic growth and inequality and mobility. In some of these issue areas we use comparative data from other countries to see how the U.S. is doing relative to other countries. In addition to class room lecture and discussion, student groups are formed to analyze policy issues of relevance to them. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for five units.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

POLISCI 124R: The Federal System: Judicial Politics and Constitutional Law

Does the constitution matter? And if so, how exactly does it shape our daily lives? In this course, we will examine the impact of structural features, such as the separation of powers and federalism. While these features often seem boring and unimportant, they are not. As we will see, arguments over structure were at the heart of the debates over slavery, the incarceration of the Japanese during WWII, the drug war and gay marriage. Prerequisites: 2 or equivalent, and sophomore standing. Fulfills Writing in the Major requirement for PoliSci majors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
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