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81 - 90 of 493 results for: all courses

ANTHRO 155: Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology (ANTHRO 255)

The course prepare students for the methodological and practical aspects of doing ecologically oriented, quantitative anthropological field research. The primary goal is to explore what it means to ask anthropological questions in a systematic way. We will focus on understanding what can constitute an interesting question, how to frame a question in way that facilitates investigation, and how to design methods to begin investigating a question. In turn, the course will provide a format to refine research projects in preparation for doing more extensive fieldwork.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 161: Human Behavioral Ecology (ANTHRO 261, HUMBIO 117H)

Theory, method, and application in anthropology. How theory in behavioral ecology developed to understand animal behavior is applied to questions about human economic decision making in ecological and evolutionary contexts. Topics include decisions about foraging and subsistence, competition and cooperation, mating, and reproduction and parenting.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 163: Conservation and Evolutionary Ecology (ANTHRO 263)

Environmental degradation resulting from human behavior, and what can be done about it. Patterns of interaction between people and environments, and why they vary over time and space. Topics include adaptation and behavior, resource acquisition and utilization, conflicts of interest, collective action problems, conspicuous consumption, waste, land management, and public policy.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 177: Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases (ANTHRO 277, HUMBIO 114)

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2013 | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 178A: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine (HUMBIO 177C)

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 180: Science, Technology, and Gender

Why is engineering often seen as a masculine profession? What have women's experiences been in entering fields of science and technology? How has gender been defined by scientists? Issues: the struggles of women in science to negotiate misogyny and cultural expectation (marriage, children), reproductive issues (surrogate motherhood, visual representations of the fetus, fetal surgery, breast feeding, childbirth practices), how the household became a site of consumerism and technology, and the cultural issues at stake as women join the ranks of scientists.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 181A: Gender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt (FEMGEN 181A)

This course explores the construction of gender in the Middle East. Drawing on the historical, sociological and anthropological research in the region, the course aims to question the stereotypes about the subordination of Muslim women and to offer students a systematic reading and analytical discussion of the political, economic and cultural structures that inform gender relations and practices in the region. The course starts with an examination of early Islam and religious sources with regard to women¿s status, then moves on to nationalist and modernization movements in the 19th and 20th centuries, and finally explores women¿s and men¿s lives in contemporary Egypt, Turkey and Iran. In this framework, we will pay special attention to Islamist mobilizations, family and sexual relations, as well as women's changing livelihoods and labor.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 184: Spirituality and Healing (HUMBIO 179S)

The puzzle of symbolic healing. How have societies without the resources of modern medicine approached healing? Why do these rituals have common features around the world? Shamanism, spirit possession, prayer, and the role of placebos in modern biomedicine. Students do ethnographic work and practical explorations along with more traditional scholarly approaches to learning.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARCHLGY 1: Introduction to Prehistoric Archeology (ANTHRO 3)

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARCHLGY 12: Peopling of the Globe: Changing Patterns of Land Use and Consumption Over the Last 50,000 Years

Fossil, genetic and archaeological evidence suggest that modern humans began to disperse out of Africa about 50,000 years ago. Subsequently, humans have colonized every major landmass on earth. This class introduces students to the data and issues regarding human dispersal, migration and colonization of continents and islands around the world. We explore problems related to the timing and cause of colonizing events, and investigate questions about changing patterns of land use, demography and consumption. Students are introduced to critical relationships between prehistoric population changes and our contemporary environmental crisis.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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