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471 - 480 of 771 results for: all courses

HUMBIO 122: Beyond Health Care: Seeking Health in Society (PEDS 222)

Available evidence at the national and cross-country level linking social welfare interventions and health outcomes. If and how non-health programs and policies could have an impact on positive health outcomes. Evaluation of social programs and policies that buffer the negative health impact of economic instability and unemployment among adult workers and their children. Examination of safety nets, including public health insurance, income maintenance programs, and disability insurance. Prerequisites: HumBio 4B or equivalent, and some background in research methods and statistics, or Instructor permission.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 122M: Challenges of Human Migration: Health and Health Care of Migrants and Autochthonous Populations (PEDS 212)

(Undergraduate students must enroll in HUMBIO 122M. MD and Graduate students enroll in PEDS 212) An emerging area of inquiry. Topics include: global migration trends, health Issues/aspects of migration, healthcare and the needs of immigrants in the US, and migrants as healthcare providers: a new area of inquiry in the US. Class is structured to include: lectures lead by the instructor and possible guest speakers; seminar, discussion and case study sessions led by students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 122S: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health (AFRICAAM 132)

Examines health disparities in the U.S., looking at the patterns of those disparities and their root causes. Explores the intersection of lower social class and ethnic minority status in affecting health status and access to health care. Compares social and biological conceptualizations of race and ethnicity.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 128: Community Health Psychology (PSYCH 101)

Social ecological perspective on health emphasizing how individual health behavior is shaped by social forces. Topics include: biobehavioral factors in health; health behavior change; community health promotion; and psychological aspects of illness, patient care, and chronic disease management. Prerequisites: HUMBIO 3B or PSYCH 1, or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Heaney, C. (PI)

HUMBIO 149L: Longevity (NENS 202, PSYCH 102)

Interdisciplinary. Challenges to and solutions for the young from increased human life expectancy: health care, financial markets, families, work, and politics. Guest lectures from engineers, economists, geneticists, and physiologists.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 172B: Children, Youth, and the Law

How the legal rights of children and adolescents in America are defined, protected, and enforced through the legal process within the context of their developmental needs and competing societal interests. Topics: origins and definitions of children's rights; adoption; custody; the juvenile justice system; education; freedom of speech; and sex. The class is interactive, using hypotheticals for discussion and analysis. A and B alternate; students may take one or both.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 176A: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, ANTHRO 282)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)

HUMBIO 178T: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ILAC 235: Critique of Technology (STS 200L)

Informed citizens living in today's world, and especially in Silicon Valley, should be able to formulate their own, articulate positions about the role of technology in culture. The course gives students the tools to do so. Against the trend towards the thoughtless celebration of all things technological, we will engage in critique in the two senses of the term: as careful study of the cultural implications of technology and as balanced, argumentative criticism. Can technology make life more meaningful, society more fair, people smarter, and the world smaller? Selections by fiction writers, philosophers and thinkers (such as Heidegger and Beller), as well as recent popular works of social commentary, such as You are not a Gadget, The Shallows, 24/7, and Present Shock.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 62Q: Truth Commissions and War Crimes Tribunals in Germany, South Africa, Bosnia, Rwanda, and elsewhere

Imagine you lived in a country in which a delusional dictator imprisons untold masses of citizens in labor camps, tortures them, and slaughters millions of them. Imagine you lived in a country, in which the ruling and unelected elite holds on to power by intimidating its citizens by pervasive secret reporting, sending many of them to prison. Imagine you lived in a country, in which one ethnic group slaughters the other. Imagine you lived in a country in which a racial white minority terrorizes and discriminates against a huge majority of black population. Imagine you lived in a country in which members of one group engage in an €"ethnic cleansing" of their old neighbors.nNow imagine something else: some big political change comes to each of these societies, and the oppressors lose their power and fall into disgrace. Now the previously oppressed engage in a deliberation what to do with their former oppressors. For the most part it is not a question of a brutal revenge by the former victims, but a legitimate and democratically authorized process.nWelcome to the questions of transitional justice. The scenarios mentioned above are real ones: Cambodia, Germany, Rwanda, South Africa, and Bosnia. All of them happened in the last few decades.nIn this course we will explore different paths these societies chose to come to terms with past injustices. Each path was devised and decided in a complex public and political debate.nWe will discuss these and other cases of specific injustices, and the subsequent means to achieve a new start for the country. We will reflect on whether its citizens gained a sense of fairness and hope for a better future, and what it means to come to terms with the past.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Lutomski, P. (PI)
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