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411 - 420 of 771 results for: all courses

HISTORY 202G: Peoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War (HISTORY 302G)

Clausewitz conceptualized war as always consisting of a trinity of passion, chance, and reason, mirrored, respectively, in the people, army and government. Following Clausewitz, this course examines the peoples, armies, and governments that shaped World War II. Analyzes the ideological, political, diplomatic and economic motivations and constraints of the belligerents and their resulting strategies, military planning and fighting. Explores the new realities of everyday life on the home fronts and the experiences of non-combatants during the war, the final destruction of National Socialist Germany and Imperial Japan, and the emerging conflict between the victors. How the peoples, armies and governments involved perceived their possibilities and choices as a means to understand the origins, events, dynamics and implications of the greatest war in history.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Vardi, G. (PI)

HISTORY 203: Premodern Economic Cultures (HISTORY 303)

Modern economists have made a science of studying the aggregate effects of individual choices. This science is based on the realities of personal freedom and individual choice. Prior to the modern era, however, different realities comprised very different economic cultures: moral economies in which greed was evil and generosity benefitted the patron¿s soul; familial collectives operating within historical conditioned diasporas; economies of obligation that threatened to collapse under their own weight as economic structures shifted. In this course we will be reading cross-culturally to develop an understanding of the shared and distinct elements of premodern economic cultures.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 203E: Global Catholicism (INTNLREL 103E)

The rise of Catholicism as a global phenomenon, and its multiple transformations as it spread to the Americas, Asia, and Africa. Topics include the Reformation, Tridentine reform and the Jesuits, the underground churches in England and the Dutch Republic, the missions to Asia, the Spanish conquest of Latin America, conversion and indigenous religions, missionary imperialism and new religious movements in the non-European world.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 203J: Water in World History (HISTORY 303J)

Examines the human relationship to water in various geographical, ecological, technological, cultural and sociopolitical settings, primarily during, but not limited to, the 19th and 20th centuries. Develops a broad historical understanding of the dwindling supply, deteriorating quality and inequitable distribution of freshwater today.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 204: What is History?

An introduction to the discipline of history, designed for current or prospective History majors. Focusing on methods and theories of historical inquiry, students will learn how historians frame problems, collect and analyze evidence, and contribute to on-going debates. Through a series of case studies or exemplary works of historical study, the course will also explore different genres of historical writing (such as narrative, biography, social history) and different methodological approaches to history (such as Annales school, microhistory, and cultural history).
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Uchida, J. (PI)

HISTORY 204G: War and Society (HISTORY 304G, REES 304G)

How Western societies and cultures have responded to modern warfare. The relationship between its destructive capacity and effects on those who produce, are subject to, and must come to terms with its aftermath. Literary representations of WW I; destructive psychological effects of modern warfare including those who take pleasure in killing; changes in relations between the genders; consequences of genocidal ideology and racial prejudice; the theory of just war and its practical implementation; and how wars are commemorated.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 205E: Comparative Historical Development of Latin America and East Asia (HISTORY 305E, ILAC 267E)

Analysis, in historical perspective, of similarities and differences between development of Latin America and East Asia from early modern times to the present. Focusing primarily on Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico, on one hand, and China, Japan, and (South) Korea, on the other, topics include impact of colonial and postcolonial relationships on development of states, markets, and classes, as well as geopolitical, social, cultural, technological and environmental factors that shaped and were shaped by them.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 207C: The Global Early Modern (HISTORY 307C)

In what sense can we speak of "globalization" before modernity? What are the characteristics and origins of the economic system we know as "capitalism"? When and why did European economies begin to diverge from those of other Eurasian societies? With these big questions in mind, the primary focus will be on the history of Europe and European empires, but substantial readings deal with other parts of the world, particularly China and the Indian Ocean.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 207G: The Age of Discovery: Maritime Science and Empire, 1400-1850 (HISTORY 307G)

This course focuses on maritime science and empire from 1400 to 1850. We will consider how early modern empires, mariners and scientific figures, used technology, gathered information, described new locations and interacted with indigenous cultures. We will explore these themes through three perspectives: The initial overseas empires of Spain and Portugal in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; Chinese and Ottoman efforts at maritime expansion and finally, British exploration and expansion into the South Pacific and China.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Aranda, M. (PI)

HISTORY 209C: Liberalism and Violence (HISTORY 309C)

Does LIberalism have a theory of violence? What does modern political thought, in privileging humanity and rights, share with "terrorists" and "rogue states?" How is liberalism transformed by the use of religion and death for political ends? We read key thinkers of modern life- Adorno, Arendt, Agamben, Benjamin, Derrida, Fanon, Foucault, Gandhi, Heidegger, and Schmitt- to interrogate the relationship between religion, sacrifice, and democracy. At the center are connections between war and modern life, and between violence and non-violence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kumar, A. (PI)
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