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481 - 490 of 773 results for: all courses

INTNLREL 62Q: Truth Commissions and War Crimes Tribunals in Germany, South Africa, Bosnia, Rwanda, and elsewhere

Imagine you lived in a country in which a delusional dictator imprisons untold masses of citizens in labor camps, tortures them, and slaughters millions of them. Imagine you lived in a country, in which the ruling and unelected elite holds on to power by intimidating its citizens by pervasive secret reporting, sending many of them to prison. Imagine you lived in a country, in which one ethnic group slaughters the other. Imagine you lived in a country in which a racial white minority terrorizes and discriminates against a huge majority of black population. Imagine you lived in a country in which members of one group engage in an €"ethnic cleansing" of their old neighbors.nNow imagine something else: some big political change comes to each of these societies, and the oppressors lose their power and fall into disgrace. Now the previously oppressed engage in a deliberation what to do with their former oppressors. For the most part it is not a question of a brutal revenge by the former victims, but a legitimate and democratically authorized process.nWelcome to the questions of transitional justice. The scenarios mentioned above are real ones: Cambodia, Germany, Rwanda, South Africa, and Bosnia. All of them happened in the last few decades.nIn this course we will explore different paths these societies chose to come to terms with past injustices. Each path was devised and decided in a complex public and political debate.nWe will discuss these and other cases of specific injustices, and the subsequent means to achieve a new start for the country. We will reflect on whether its citizens gained a sense of fairness and hope for a better future, and what it means to come to terms with the past.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lutomski, P. (PI)

INTNLREL 101Z: Introduction to International Relations (POLISCI 101Z)

Approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Applications to war, terrorism, trade policy, the environment, and world poverty. Debates about the ethics of war and the global distribution of wealth.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Tomz, M. (PI)

INTNLREL 102: History of the International System (HISTORY 102)

After defining the characteristics of the international system at the beginning of the twentieth century, this course reviews the primary developments in its functioning in the century that followed. Topics include the major wars and peace settlements; the emergence of Nazism and Communism; the development of the Cold War and nuclear weapons; the rise of China, India, and the EU; and the impact of Islamic terrorism. The role of international institutions and international society will also be a focus as will the challenge of environment, health, poverty, and climate issues to the functioning of the system.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

INTNLREL 103E: Global Catholicism (HISTORY 203E)

The rise of Catholicism as a global phenomenon, and its multiple transformations as it spread to the Americas, Asia, and Africa. Topics include the Reformation, Tridentine reform and the Jesuits, the underground churches in England and the Dutch Republic, the missions to Asia, the Spanish conquest of Latin America, conversion and indigenous religions, missionary imperialism and new religious movements in the non-European world.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

INTNLREL 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, EMED 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

INTNLREL 110C: America and the World Economy (POLISCI 110C, POLISCI 110X)

Examination of contemporary US foreign economic policy. Areas studied: the changing role of the dollar; mechanism of international monetary management; recent crises in world markets including those in Europe and Asia; role of IMF, World Bank and WTO in stabilizing world economy; trade politics and policies; the effects of the globalization of business on future US prosperity. Enroll in PoliSci 110C for WIM credit.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

INTNLREL 110D: War and Peace in American Foreign Policy (AMSTUD 110D, POLISCI 110D, POLISCI 110Y)

(Students not taking this course for WIM, register for 110Y.) The causes of war in American foreign policy. Issues: international and domestic sources of war and peace; war and the American political system; war, intervention, and peace making in the post-Cold War period.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Schultz, K. (PI)

INTNLREL 122: Introduction to European Studies (POLISCI 213E)

This course offers an introduction to major topics in the study of historical and contemporary Europe. We focus on European politics, economics and culture. First, we study what makes Europe special, and how its distinct identity has been influenced by its history. Next, we analyze Europe's politics. We study parliamentary government and proportional representation electoral systems, and how they affect policy. Subsequently, we examine the challenges the European economy faces. We further study the European Union and transatlantic relations.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Crombez, C. (PI)

INTNLREL 122A: The Political Economy of the European Union

EU institutions, the legislative process, policies, relations with the U.S., and enlargement and the future of the EU. History and theories of EU integration. Democratic accountability of the institutions, and the emerging party system. Principal policies in agriculture, regional development, the internal market, single currency, and competition. Emphasis is on policies that affect the relations with the U.S. including trade and security. Results of the EU's constitutional convention.
Terms: not given next year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

INTNLREL 123: The Future of the European Union: Challenges and Opportunities

First, this course analyzes the EU's greatest challenge, preserving the monetary union, and discusses the political and economic reforms needed to achieve that goal. In this context the course also studies the fiscal and budgetary polices of the EU. Second, the course discusses the EU's role in global politics, its desire to play a more prominent role, and the ways to reach that objective. Third, the course analyzes the EU's institutional challenges in its efforts to enhance its democratic character.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Crombez, C. (PI)
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