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321 - 330 of 773 results for: all courses

HISTORY 47: History of South Africa (AFRICAAM 47)

(Same as HISTORY 147. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Campbell, J. (PI)

HISTORY 48: The Egyptians (AFRICAAM 30, CLASSICS 82, HISTORY 148)

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Austin, A. (PI)

HISTORY 48Q: South Africa: Contested Transitions (AFRICAAM 48Q)

Preference to sophomores. The inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president in May 1994 marked the end of an era and a way of life for South Africa. The changes have been dramatic, yet the legacies of racism and inequality persist. Focus: overlapping and sharply contested transitions. Who advocates and opposes change? Why? What are their historical and social roots and strategies? How do people reconstruct their society? Historical and current sources, including films, novels, and the Internet.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Samoff, J. (PI)

HISTORY 48S: History of Health, Science and Medicine in 20th Century Africa (AFRICAST 48S, ANTHRO 48S)

This course will examine the impact of colonial policies and post-colonial development on patterns of sickness, wellness and health care in twentieth century sub-Saharan Africa. Some topics will include: the role of colonial science in the formulation of ideas about race, colonial epidemics, labor migration and disease, urban health, encounters between African healers and biomedicine, histories of HIV/AIDS, the impact of debt and Structural Adjustment Programs on public health, and the politics of humanitarian interventions in African health. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hill, R. (PI)

HISTORY 50A: Colonial and Revolutionary America

(Same as HISTORY 150A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150A.) Survey of the origins of American society and polity in the 17th and 18th centuries. Topics: the migration of Europeans and Africans and the impact on native populations; the emergence of racial slavery and of regional, provincial, Protestant cultures; and the political origins and constitutional consequences of the American Revolution.
Terms: Aut, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Gienapp, J. (PI)

HISTORY 50B: 19th Century America (AFRICAAM 50B)

(Same as HISTORY 150B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Campbell, J. (PI)

HISTORY 50C: The United States in the Twentieth Century

(Same as HISTORY 150C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150C.) This course begins around 1900, when women and most African-Americans could not vote; automobiles were virtually unknown and computers unimaginable; and the U.S. was a minor power overshadowed by Europe. Yet fierce debates over the purpose of government and role of the U.S. in the world animated national politics, as they do today. This course surveys U.S. politics, culture, and social movements to answer the question: How did we get from there to here? Suitable for non-majors and majors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Burns, J. (PI)

HISTORY 50N: Who Killed Jane Stanford?

In 1905 Jane Stanford died of strychnine poisoning. Who may have killed her remains unknown. You will, in effect, be a grand jury. Like most of your real life intellectual work, the class will be collaborative. Together you will identify suspects and examine the often odd actions of central figures in the case: her personal secretary, physicians, and David Starr Jordan, the president of Stanford.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 54S: The American Civil War

Few events in American history match the significance of the Civil War, a conflict that freed 4 million people held in bondage and left 750,000 men dead. This course will explore the war from a range of perspectives, including those of Union and Confederate soldiers, African Americans, women, and Native Americans. Based on the documents these different groups left behind, as well as the histories they inspired, we will seek to understand how the Civil War was experienced and commemorated. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win, offered once only | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Stern, A. (PI)

HISTORY 55N: Social Movements through Song in Modern America (AMSTUD 55N)

This discussion class will explore a series of social movements in modern America through the songs produced to support efforts to achieve labor unions, civil rights and racial justice, peace, and women's rights. For each class we will read short historical texts to provide contexts for the movements and then concentrate on the role of music within them. We will listening to and discuss several core songs for each topic. Biographical and autobiographical readings on a key set of musicians (including Joe Hill, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Malvina Reynolds, and Bernice Johnson Reagon) will provide personal accounts of the relationship of songs to social movement . The music we include in class will range from ballads to anthems, from oral traditions to the work of singer-songwriters.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)
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