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441 - 450 of 887 results for: all courses

HISTORY 230A: The Witness in Modern History: Memoir, Reportage, Image

The rise of the witness as icon and debates about its reliability as a historical source. The power of eyewitness accounts to convict accused criminals, inspire indignation about war and genocide, and attract attention to humanitarian crises. Their notorious unreliability due to exaggeration and misapprehension. Sources include reportage, photography, and documentary film. Case studies include criminal cases, war, poverty, and natural disasters.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 231C: The Great War: WWI in Literature, Film, Art, and Memory (FRENCH 258, FRENCH 358, HISTORY 332C)

This course concerns how writers, artists, and other cultural producers understood and represented the traumas of the First World War and its aftermath. Rather than tracing a political or military history of the conflict, we¿ll focus on how the horrors of War (both in the trenches and on the home front) fostered broader social and cultural shifts, as people questioned the very foundations of European civilization. Most specifically, we'll explore the connections between the War and the emergence of post-War modernist movements, as writers and artists created new works to help them make sense of the catastrophe and the new world it wrought. Though France provides our starting point, we'll also travel beyond the Hexagon to incorporate other views and major works. Course readings will be in English, though students may elect to read works in French if they wish.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Braude, M. (PI)

HISTORY 231E: Paper, Printing, and Digital Revolutions: Transformations of the Book (HISTORY 331E)

What is a book? This seminar explores the conceptual implications of approximately two millennia of transformations in the physical and material properties of books. How have the meaning and authority we assign the written word changed as technologies of book production and dissemination have evolved, and how have they remained continuous? Topics covered include the rise of the medieval manuscript codex, the emergence of print culture in early modern Europe, and current debates over the nature of text in the digital age.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 232A: Power, Art, and Knowledge in Renaissance Italy (HISTORY 332A)

Provides a fundamental understanding of the cultural and political imagination of the Italian Renaissance, with particular emphasis on Florence between 1300 and 1600 CE. Topics include political and social upheavals, radical shifts in religious practice and devotion, the commercial revolution in trade and banking, the rediscovery of classical philosophy and style, and the flowering of the literary and visual arts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Brege, B. (PI)

HISTORY 232D: Rome: The City and the World, 1300-1800 (HISTORY 332D)

What lies beyond the ruins of an ancient city? How did Rome revive? The history of Rome from the late Middle Ages and Renaissance to the age of the Grand Tour. Topics include: the history of the papacy; the everyday world of Roman citizens; the relationship between the city and the surrounding countryside; the material transformation of Rome and projects to map the city; and its meaning for foreigners.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Findlen, P. (PI)

HISTORY 233C: Two British Revolutions (HISTORY 333C)

Current scholarship on Britain,1640-1700, focusing on political and religious history. Topics include: causes and consequences of the English civil war and revolution; rise and fall of revolutionary Puritanism; the Restoration; popular politics in the late 17th century; changing contours of religious life; the crisis leading to the Glorious Revolution; and the new order that emerged after the deposing of James II.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 233F: Political Thought in Early Modern Britain

1500 to 1700. Theorists include Hobbes, Locke, Harrington, the Levellers, and lesser known writers and schools. Foundational ideas and problems underlying modern British and American political thought and life.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 236: The Ethics of Imperialism

Can a commitment to liberty, progress, and universal rights be reconciled with imperialism? The ethical underpinnings of empire; how modern Europeans provided ethical and political justifications for colonial expansion. How European ideals were used to defend and justify inequality, violence, and genocide. The ethics of American-driven globalization and humanitarianism. Texts include primary sources, philosophical treatises, and historical studies.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 236B: Hobbes to Habermas: The Idea of Society in Modern Thought (HISTORY 336B)

Classic texts in social theory from the seventeenth century to the present. Readings include Locke, Smith, Hegel, Comte, and Durkheim, and Weber.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

HISTORY 239E: Paris: The Making of a Modern Icon (FRENCH 227, URBANST 142)

Few places have been as heavily romanticized and mythologized as Paris. To many observers, Paris and its attractions serve as icons of modernity itself. By engaging with fiction, film, journalism, painting, photography, poetry, song, and other media, we¿ll trace how different people at different times have used Paris as both backdrop and main protagonist, and we'll consider how the city itself has incorporated and rebelled against such representations. The scope of our inquiry will stretch from the late 18th century to the present, covering a host of topics, figures, and sites: from the French Revolution to the protests of May '68, from Baudelaire to Hemingway, from the Impressionists to the Situationists. Taught in English
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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