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631 - 640 of 775 results for: all courses

POLISCI 291: Political Institutions

This course focuses on the role of political institutions in shaping policy outcomes around the world, with special attention to the United States. Students will become familiar with a wide range of theoretical approaches to the study of institutions, and they will learn the basics of applied quantitative empirical analysis. Enrollment is restricted to Political Science Research Honors Track students.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Hall, A. (PI)

POLISCI 292: Political Behavior

This research seminar will survey important topics in the study of mass political behavior including public opinion, political participation, partisanship and voting. Open only to students in the Political Science Research Honors Track.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

POLISCI 293: Research Design

This course is designed to teach students how to design a research project. The course emphasizes the specification of testable hypotheses, the building of data sets, and the inferences from that may be drawn from that evidence. It is only open to students in the PS Research Honors Track.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

Human behavior and mental processes including the nervous system, consciousness, learning, memory, development, emotion, psychopathology, interpersonal process, society, and culture. Current research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PSYCH 7Q: Language Understanding by Children and Adults

How do we first learn to find meaning in strings of speech sounds? Understanding spoken language requires the rapid integration of acoustic information with linguistic knowledge and with conceptual knowledge based on experience with how things happen in the world. Topics include research on early development of language understanding and laboratory methods of how young children make sense of speech. Observations of preschool children and visits to Stanford laboratories. Might be repeatable for credit.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PSYCH 8N: The New Longevity

Adult development from the perspective of life-span theory -- a conceptual framework that views development as a series of adaptations to physical, societal and individual resources and constraints. Students will learn about demographic and medical changes, ways that individuals typically change socially, emotionally and cognitively as they move through adulthood. An understanding of the conceptual foundations of the life-span approach and place aging of young people today in historical context.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PSYCH 11N: Origin of Mental Life

Preference to freshmen. Mental life in infancy; how thinking originates. How do babies construe the objects, events, people, and language that surround them? Recent advances in psychological theory, hypotheses, and evidence about how the infant human mind develops.
Last offered: Spring 2012 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PSYCH 12N: Self Theories

Preference to freshmen. The impact of people's belief in a growing versus fixed self on their motivation and performance in school, business, sports, and relationships. How such theories develop and can be changed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Dweck, C. (PI)

PSYCH 13N: Emotion Regulation

This seminar provides a selective overview of the scientific study of emotion regulation. Topics include: theoretical foundations, cognitive consequences, developmental approaches, personality processes and individual differences, and clinical and treatment implications. Our focus is on interesting, experimentally tractable ideas. Meetings will be discussion based.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PSYCH 15N: Interpersonal Influence

This course will examine how individuals influence each other, both intentionally as well as nonconsciously. The focus will be on individuals in dyads rather than in groups. We will examine a) subtle interpersonal influence processes such as nonverbal communication, b) structural sources of interpersonal influence such as gender, race, social class, and culture, and c) interpersonal influence within different relationships such as organizational and romantic relationships. Familiarity with technology and video editing is useful. Students will have the opportunity to make brief podcasts and iMovie videos, as weekly responses to readings, as well as for the final class project.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
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